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November 2014
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Assessment Guide

Assessment Guide

Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide

THE GEORGIA MILESTONES ASSESSMENT SYSTEM
GEORGIA MILESTONES END-OF-GRADE (EOG) ASSESSMENTS
ASSESSMENT GUIDE

2
3
3

TESTING SCHEDULE

4

DEPTH OF KNOWLEDGE DESCRIPTORS
DEPTH OF KNOWLEDGE SKILLS AND QUESTION CUES

4
6

SCORES

7

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA)
DESCRIPTION OF TEST FORMAT AND ORGANIZATION
CONTENT MEASURED
GRADE 5 ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA): DOMAIN STRUCTURES AND CONTENT WEIGHTS
ITEM TYPES
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA) EXAMPLE ITEMS
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA) ADDITIONAL SAMPLE ITEMS
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA) ADDITIONAL SAMPLE ITEM KEYS
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA) EXAMPLE SCORING RUBRICS AND EXEMPLAR RESPONSES
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA) WRITING RUBRICS

8
8
9
10
11
11
21
34
36
40

MATHEMATICS
DESCRIPTION OF TEST FORMAT AND ORGANIZATION
CONTENT MEASURED
GRADE 5 MATHEMATICS: DOMAIN STRUCTURES AND CONTENT WEIGHTS
ITEM TYPES
MATHEMATICS EXAMPLE ITEMS
MATHEMATICS ADDITIONAL SAMPLE ITEMS
MATHEMATICS ADDITIONAL SAMPLE ITEM KEYS
MATHEMATICS EXAMPLE SCORING RUBRICS AND EXEMPLAR RESPONSES

46
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48
49
49
53
61
63

SCIENCE
DESCRIPTION OF TEST FORMAT AND ORGANIZATION
CONTENT MEASURED
GRADE 5 SCIENCE: DOMAIN STRUCTURES AND CONTENT WEIGHTS
ITEM TYPES
SCIENCE EXAMPLE ITEMS
SCIENCE ADDITIONAL SAMPLE ITEMS
SCIENCE ADDITIONAL SAMPLE ITEM KEYS

66
66
67
68
69
69
75
81

SOCIAL STUDIES
DESCRIPTION OF TEST FORMAT AND ORGANIZATION
CONTENT MEASURED
GRADE 5 SOCIAL STUDIES: DOMAIN STRUCTURES AND CONTENT WEIGHTS
ITEM TYPES
SOCIAL STUDIES EXAMPLE ITEMS
SOCIAL STUDIES ADDITIONAL SAMPLE ITEMS
SOCIAL STUDIES ADDITIONAL SAMPLE ITEM KEYS

84
84
85
86
87
87
92
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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide

THE GEORGIA MILESTONES ASSESSMENT SYSTEM
The purpose of the Georgia Student Assessment Program is to measure student achievement of the state-adopted content standards and inform efforts to improve teaching and learning. Results of the assessment program are utilized to identify students failing to achieve mastery of content, to provide educators with feedback about instructional practice, and to assist school districts in identifying strengths and weaknesses in order to establish priorities in planning educational programs.
The State Board of Education is required by Georgia law (O.C.G.A. §20-2-281) to adopt assessments designed to measure student achievement relative to the knowledge and skills set forth in the stateadopted content standards. The Georgia Milestones Assessment System (Georgia Milestones) fulfills this requirement and, as a key component of Georgia’s Student Assessment Program, is a comprehensive summative assessment program spanning grade 3 through high school. Georgia Milestones measures how well students have learned the knowledge and skills outlined in the state-adopted content standards in Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies. Students in grades 3–8 take an end-of-grade assessment in each content area, while high school students take an end-of-course assessment for each of the eight courses designated by the State Board of Education. In accordance with
State Board Rule, Georgia Milestones end-of-course measures serve as the final exams for the specified high school courses.
The main purpose of Georgia Milestones is to inform efforts to improve student achievement by assessing student performance on the standards specific to each course or subject/grade tested.
Specifically, Georgia Milestones is designed to provide students and their parents with critical information about the students’ achievement and, importantly, their preparedness for the next educational level. The assessment system is a critical informant of the state’s accountability measure, the College and Career Ready Performance Index (CCRPI), providing an important gauge about the quality of the educational services and opportunities provided throughout the state. The ultimate goal of Georgia’s assessment and accountability system is to ensure that all students are provided the opportunity to engage with high-quality content standards, receive high-quality instruction predicated upon those standards, and are positioned to meet high academic expectations.
Features of the Georgia Milestones Assessment System include:
 open-ended (constructed-response) items in Language Arts and Mathematics (all grades and courses);  a writing component (in response to passages read by students) at every grade level and course within the Language Arts assessment;
 norm-referenced items in all content areas and courses to complement the criterion-referenced information and to provide a national comparison; and
 a transition to online administration over time, with online administration considered the primary mode of administration and paper/pencil as a back-up until the transition is complete.
The primary mode of administration for the Georgia Milestones program is online, with the goal of completing the transition from paper/pencil within five years after the inaugural administration (i.e., the

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide

2014–2015 school year). Paper/pencil test materials (such as Braille) will remain available for students with disabilities who may require them in order to access the assessment.
Georgia Milestones follows guiding principles to help ensure that the assessment system:
 is sufficiently challenging to ensure Georgia students are well positioned to compete with other students across the United States and internationally;
 is intentionally designed across grade levels to send a clear signal of student academic progress and preparedness for the next level, be it the next grade level, course, or college or career;
 is accessible to all students, including those with disabilities or limited English proficiency, at all achievement levels;
 supports and informs the state’s educator effectiveness initiatives, ensuring items and forms are appropriately sensitive to quality instructional practices; and
 accelerates the transition to online administration, allowing—over time—for the inclusion of innovative technology-enhanced items.

Georgia Milestones End-of-Grade (EOG) Assessments
As previously mentioned, Georgia law (§20-2-281) mandates that the State Board of Education adopt annual measures of student achievement in the content areas of English Language Arts (ELA),
Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies in grades 3 through 8. Students must participate in the Georgia
Milestones content areas measured at the end of each grade in which they are enrolled. State law further mandates that student achievement in reading, as measured as a component of the Georgia
Milestones English Language Arts (ELA) EOG assessment, be utilized in promotion and retention decisions for students in grades 3, 5, and 8, while student achievement in mathematics, as measured by the Georgia Milestones Mathematics EOG assessment, be considered in grades 5 and 8. Students who fail to demonstrate grade-level achievement on these measures must receive remediation and be offered an opportunity for a retest prior to consideration for promotion to grades 4, 6, and 9 (§20-2-283 and State Board of Education Rule 160-4-2-.11).
Results of the EOG assessments, according to the legislated and identified purposes, must:
 provide a valid measure of student achievement of the state content standards across the full achievement continuum;
 provide a clear signal of each student’s preparedness for the next educational level (i.e., grade);
 allow for the detection of the academic progress made by each student from one assessed grade to the next;
 be suitable for use in promotion and retention decisions at grades 3 (reading), 5 (reading and mathematics), and 8 (reading and mathematics);
 support and inform educator effectiveness measures; and
 inform state and federal accountability measures at the school, district, and state levels.

Assessment Guide
The Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide is provided to acquaint Georgia educators and other stakeholders with the structure and content assessed by the tests. Importantly, this guide is not intended to inform instructional planning. It is essential to note that there are a small number of content
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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide

standards that are better suited for classroom or individual assessment rather than large-scale summative assessment. While those standards are not included on the tests, and therefore are not included in this Assessment Guide, the knowledge, concepts, and skills inherent in those standards are often required for the mastery of the standards that are assessed. Failure to attend to all content standards within a content area can limit a student’s opportunity to learn and show what he or she knows and can do on the assessments.
The Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide is in no way intended to substitute for the state-mandated content standards; it is provided to help educators better understand the structure and content of the assessments, but is not all encompassing of the knowledge, concepts and skills covered in grade 5 or assessed on the tests. The state-adopted content standards and associated standards-based instructional resources, such as the Content Frameworks, should be used to plan instruction. This
Assessment Guide can serve as a supplement to those resources, in addition to any locally developed resources, but should not be used in isolation. In principle, this Assessment Guide is intended to be descriptive of the assessment program and should not be considered all-inclusive. The state-adopted content standards are located at www.georgiastandards.org.

TESTING SCHEDULE
The Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG assessment is offered during the Main Administration each spring and one Summer Administration for retests. Please note that there will be no retest administrations during the 2014–2015 school year.
Students will take the Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG assessment on days specified by their local school district during the testing window. Each district determines a local testing window within the state-designated testing window.

DEPTH OF KNOWLEDGE DESCRIPTORS
Items found on the Georgia Milestones assessments, including the Grade 5 EOG assessment, are developed with a particular emphasis on cognitive complexity, or Depth of Knowledge (DOK). DOK is measured on a scale of 1 to 4 and refers to the level of cognitive demand required to complete a task (or in this case, an assessment item). The higher the level, the more complex the assessment; however, higher levels do not necessarily mean more difficult items. For instance, a question can have a low DOK but a medium or even high difficulty level. Conversely, a DOK 4 question may have a low difficulty level but still require a great deal of cognitive thinking (e.g., analyzing and synthesizing information instead of just recalling it). The following descriptions and table show the expectations of the four DOK levels in greater detail.
Level 1 (Recall of Information) generally requires students to identify, list, or define, often asking them to recall who, what, when, and where. Consequently, this level usually asks students to recall facts, terms, concepts, and trends and may ask them to identify specific information contained in documents, excerpts, quotations, maps, charts, tables, graphs, or illustrations. Items that require students to

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide

“describe” and/or “explain” could be classified at Level 1 or Level 2 depending on what is to be described and/or explained. A Level 1 “describe” and/or “explain” would require students to recall, recite, or reproduce information.
Level 2 (Basic Reasoning) includes the engagement of some mental processing beyond recalling or reproducing a response. A Level 2 “describe” and/or “explain” would require students to go beyond a description or explanation of recalled information to describe and/or explain a result or “how” or “why.”
Level 3 (Complex Reasoning) requires reasoning, using evidence, and thinking on a higher and more abstract level than Level 1 and Level 2. Students will go beyond explaining or describing “how and why” to justifying the “how and why” through application and evidence. Level 3 questions often involve making connections across time and place to explain a concept or “big idea.”
Level 4 (Extended Reasoning) requires the complex reasoning of Level 3 with the addition of planning, investigating, applying significant conceptual understanding, and/or developing that will most likely require an extended period of time. Students should be required to connect and relate ideas and concepts within the content area or among content areas in order to be at this highest level. The distinguishing factor for Level 4 would be evidence through a task, product, or extended response that the cognitive demands have been met.
The table on the next page identifies skills that students will need to demonstrate at each DOK level, along with sample question cues appropriate for each level.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide

Depth of Knowledge Skills and Question Cues
Level

Recall of Information
Level 1

Basic Reasoning
Level 2

Complex Reasoning
Level 3

Skills Demonstrated
 Make observations
 Recall information
 Recognize formulas, properties, patterns, processes  Know vocabulary, definitions
 Know basic concepts
 Perform one-step processes
 Translate from one representation to another
 Identify relationships

 Apply learned information to abstract and reallife situations
 Use methods, concepts, theories in abstract and real life situations
 Perform multi-step processes
 Solve problems using required skills or knowledge
(requires more than habitual response)
 Make a decision about how to proceed
 Identify and organize components of a whole
 Extend patterns
 Identify/describe cause and effect
 Recognize unstated assumptions, make inferences  Interpret facts
 Compare or contrast simple concepts/ideas
 Solve an open-ended problem with more than one correct answer
 Create a pattern
 Generalize from given facts
 Relate knowledge from several sources
 Draw conclusions
 Make predictions
 Translate knowledge into new contexts
 Compare and discriminate between ideas
 Assess value of methods, concepts, theories, processes, formulas
 Make choices based on a reasoned argument
 Verify the value of evidence, information, numbers, data

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Question Cues
 Tell what, when, or where  Find
 List
 Define
 Identify; label; name
 Choose; select
 Compute; estimate
 Express as
 Read from data displays
 Order
 Apply
 Calculate; solve
 Complete
 Describe
 Explain how; demonstrate  Construct data displays
 Construct; draw
 Analyze
 Extend
 Connect
 Classify
 Arrange
 Compare; contrast













Plan; prepare
Predict
Create; design
Ask “what if?” questions
Generalize
Justify; explain why; support; convince
Assess
Rank; grade
Test; judge
Recommend
Select
Conclude

Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide

Level

Extended Reasoning
Level 4

Skills Demonstrated
 Analyze and synthesize information from multiple sources  Examine and explain alternative perspectives across a variety of sources
 Describe and illustrate how common themes are found across texts from different cultures
 Apply mathematical models to illuminate a problem or situation
 Design a mathematical model to inform and solve a practical or abstract situation
 Combine and synthesize ideas into new concepts

Question Cues









Design
Connect
Synthesize
Apply concepts
Critique
Analyze
Create
Prove

SCORES
Students will receive an EOG scale score, an achievement level designation, and a number correct out of the number possible on items aligned to the state content standards. Students will also receive scores on norm-referenced items that allow comparison to a national group of students. Additional information on the items contributing to these scores is found in the Description of Test Format and
Organization section for English Language Arts (ELA), Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies.
Selected-response items are machine scored. The Science and Social Studies assessments consist of only selected-response items. However, the English Language Arts (ELA) assessment consists of a variety of item types that contribute to the student’s score, including selected-response, constructed-response, extended constructed-response, and extended writing-response. Likewise, the Mathematics assessment consists of selected-response, constructed-response, and extended constructed-response items. Items that are not machine scored—i.e., constructed-response, extended constructed-response, and extended writing-response items—require rubrics for manual scoring.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA)
Description of Test Format and Organization
The Georgia Milestones EOG assessment is primarily a criterion-referenced test, designed to provide information about how well a student has mastered the grade-level state-adopted content standards in
English Language Arts (ELA). Each student will receive one of four proficiency levels, depending on how well the student has mastered the content standards. In addition to criterion-referenced information, the Georgia Milestones measures will also include a limited sample of nationally norm-referenced items to provide a signal of how Georgia students are achieving relative to their peers nationally. The normreferenced information provided is supplementary to the criterion-referenced proficiency designation and will not be utilized in any manner other than to serve as a barometer of national comparison. Only the criterion-referenced scores and proficiency designations will be utilized in the accountability metrics associated with the assessment program (such as student growth measures, educator effectiveness measures, or the CCRPI).
The Grade 5 English Language Arts (ELA) EOG assessment consists of a total of 60 items, 54 of which are operational items (and contribute to a student’s criterion-referenced and/or norm-referenced score) and 6 of which are field test items (newly written items that are being tried out and do not contribute to the student’s score). The criterion-referenced score, and proficiency designation, is comprised of 44 items, for a total of 55 points. Students will respond to a variety of item types, including selectedresponse, constructed-response, extended constructed-response, and extended writing-response items.
Of the 54 operational items, 20 will be norm-referenced and will provide a national comparison in the form of a national percentile rank. Ten of the items have been verified as aligned to the course content standards by Georgia educators and will therefore contribute to the criterion-referenced proficiency designation. The other 10 items will contribute only to the national percentile rank and be provided as supplemental information. Only items that are aligned to the state-adopted content standards will be utilized to inform the criterion-referenced score.
With the inclusion of the norm-referenced items, students may encounter items for which they have not received direct instruction. These items will not contribute to the student’s criterion-referenced proficiency designation; only items that align to the course content standards will contribute to the criterion-referenced score. Students should be instructed to try their best should they ask about an item that is not aligned to the content they have learned as part of the course.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Grade 5 English Language Arts (ELA) EOG Assessment Design
Description

Number of
Items

Points for CR1 Score

Points for NRT2
Feedback

CR Selected-Response Items

30

30

0

NRT Selected-Response Items

203

104

20

CR Constructed-Response Items

3

8

0

CR Extended Writing-Response
Items

1

7

0

CR Field Test Items

6

0

0

Total Items/Points5

60

55

20

1CR—Criterion-Referenced:
2NRT—Norm

items aligned to state-adopted content standards
Referenced Test: items that will yield a national comparison; may or may not be aligned to state-adopted content

standards
3Of these items, 10 will contribute to both the CR scores and NRT feedback. The other 10 of these items will contribute to NRT feedback only and will not impact the student’s proficiency designation, scale score, or grade conversion.
4Alignment of national NRT items to course content standards was verified by a committee of Georgia educators. Only approved, aligned NRT items will contribute to a student’s CR proficiency designation, scale score, and grade conversion score.
5Total number of items contributing to CR score: 44; total points: 55; total number of items contributing to NRT feedback: 20; total points: 20

The test will be given in three sections. Students may have up to 70 minutes per section to complete
Sections 1 and 2. Students will be given a maximum of 90 minutes to complete Section 3, which includes the extended writing-response. The total estimated testing time for the Grade 5 English Language Arts
(ELA) EOG assessment ranges from approximately 190 to 230 minutes. Total testing time describes the amount of time students have to complete the assessment. It does not take into account the time required for the test examiner to complete pre-administration and post-administration activities (such as reading the standardized directions to students). Sections 1 and 2 must be scheduled to be administered on the same day in one test session following the district’s testing protocols for the EOG measures (in keeping with state guidance). Section 3, which focuses on writing, must be administered on a separate day following the completion of Sections 1 and 2.

Content Measured
The Grade 5 English Language Arts (ELA) assessment will measure the standards that are enumerated for Grade 5 as described on www.georgiastandards.org.
The content of the assessment is organized into two groupings, or domains, of standards for the purposes of providing feedback on student performance. A content domain is a reporting category that broadly describes and defines the content of the course, as measured by the EOG assessment. The standards for Grade 5 English Language Arts (ELA) are grouped into two domains: Reading/Vocabulary and Writing/Language. Each domain was created by organizing standards that share similar content characteristics. The content standards describe the level of expertise that Grade 5 English Language Arts
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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
(ELA) educators should strive to develop in their students. Educators should refer to the content standards for a full understanding of the knowledge, concepts, and skills subject to be assessed on the
EOG assessment.
The approximate proportional number of points associated with each domain is shown in the following table. A range of cognitive levels will be represented on the Grade 5 English Language Arts (ELA) EOG assessment. Educators should always use the content standards when planning instruction.

Grade 5 English Language Arts (ELA): Domain Structures and Content Weights
Domain

Reading and Vocabulary

Writing and Language

Approximate
Weight

Standard
ELACC5RI1
ELACC5RI2
ELACC5RI3
ELACC5RI4
ELACC5RI5
ELACC5RI6
ELACC5RI7
ELACC5RI8
ELACC5RI9
ELACC5RL1
ELACC5RL2
ELACC5W1
(1a, 1b, 1c, 1d)
ELACC5W2
(2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e)
ELACC5W3
(3a, 3b, 3c, 3d, 3e)
ELACC5W4
ELACC5W7

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ELACC5RL3
ELACC5RL4
ELACC5RL5
ELACC5RL6
ELACC5RL7
ELACC5RL9
ELACC5L4
(4a, 4b, 4c)
ELACC5L5
(5a, 5b, 5c)

53%

ELACC5W8
ELACC5W9
ELACC5L1
(1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e)
ELACC5L2
(2a, 2b, 2c, 2e)
ELACC5L3
(3a)

47%

Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Item Types
The English Language Arts (ELA) portion of the Grade 5 EOG assessment consists of selected-response, constructed-response, extended constructed-response, and extended writing-response items.
A selected-response item, sometimes called a multiple-choice item, is defined as a question, problem, or statement that appears on a test followed by several answer choices, sometimes called options or response choices. The incorrect choices, called distractors, usually reflect common errors. The student’s task is to choose, from the alternatives provided, the best answer to the question posed in the stem (the question). The English Language Arts (ELA) selected-response items will have four answer choices.
A constructed-response item asks a question and solicits the student to provide a response he or she constructs on his or her own, as opposed to selecting from options provided. The constructed-response items on the EOG assessment will be worth two points. Partial credit may be awarded.
An extended constructed-response item is a specific type of constructed-response item that elicits a longer, more detailed response from the student than a two-point constructed-response item. The extended constructed-response items on the EOG assessment will be worth four points. For English
Language Arts (ELA), the student will respond to a narrative prompt based on a passage the student has read, and the response will be scored for the Writing/Language domain. Partial credit may be awarded.
The extended writing-response items require students to write an opinion piece or develop an informative/explanatory response. The extended writing-response, or writing task, includes two passages, three selected-response items, and one constructed-response item that scaffold students’ understanding of the passage(s). Two of the selected-response items will address each of the passages separately. One selected-response item and the constructed-response item will address both of the passages together. All four items contribute to the Reading/Vocabulary domain. These items will be followed by an extended writing-prompt, which requires the student to draw from reading experiences when writing an essay response and to cite evidence from the passage(s) to support claims and conclusions in the essay. The writing task is worth seven points.

English Language Arts (ELA) Example Items
Example items, which are representative of three DOK levels across various Grade 5 English Language
Arts (ELA) content domains, are provided on the following pages. All example and sample items contained in this guide are the property of the Georgia Department of Education.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Example Items 1 and 2
Read the movie poster The Longest Trail and the movie review The Truth of the Matter and answer questions 1 and 2.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
The Truth of the Matter
As the sun sets over a beautiful western town, a handsome young man gazes at a lovely young woman. Their clothes are neatly pressed and neither has a hair out of place. It’s a perfect scene.
There is only one problem. It is too good to be true.
The scene is from the movie The Longest Trail. It is a beautifully filmed movie with talented actors, but it does not show what life was really like in the 1800s.
As the movie begins, we learn that a group of cowboys has been traveling on a cattle trail for many days in the late winter. Their goal is to transport cattle from a city in southern Texas to a city in
Oklahoma. The first scene takes place as the group crosses the Red River. The river is flowing quickly, and there are some tense moments as the cowboys attempt to get their horses and cattle across.
However, they all make it across without a scratch, and they laugh as they head back to the trail.
The truth is that the life of a cowboy was much more dangerous and exhausting than the movie shows. The cowboys in the movie laughed that their clothes and horses were wet. But real cowboys knew that wearing wet clothes in the winter was dangerous and could cause them to suffer from a condition called hypothermia. Their body temperatures could drop, and they could get sick or die.
The cowboys in the movie continue on down the trail. At night, they tell stories around the campfire and then drift off to sleep. Real cowboys, however, never really got a good night’s rest. Instead, they spent a large part of the night keeping watch. They had to make sure their animals did not wander off, were not attacked by predators, and were not stolen by other cowboys.
The next day, the cowboys in the movie get up and begin to prepare for the day ahead. However,
Joshua, the main character, decides that he is going to return home to Texas. He misses his wife and his family and wants nothing more than to see them again. He explains to the other cowboys that he must leave them or regret the journey forever. Then he turns his horse around and heads south.
Though the situation makes for a great Hollywood story, it is completely unrealistic. Cowboys sacrificed a great deal and often had to leave family behind. Cowboys were paid poorly, and they would never leave a job without completing it. If they did, they would not get paid at all.
Joshua returns to his home in Texas and finds his beautiful wife just as the sun is setting. In real life,
Joshua would have found it very hard to make the trip back to Texas alone. Cowboys faced many obstacles on their travels, such as falling off their horses or running into wild animals. Traveling alone meant there was no one to give the cowboy aid if he had an injury or got sick.
Though many parts of the movie were beautifully filmed, the movie was simply not realistic. The
Longest Trail should be called The Longest Trail Away From the Truth.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Example Item 1
DOK Level: 2
English Language Arts (ELA) Grade 5 Content Domain: Reading and Vocabulary
Standard: ELACC5RI1. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
Which sentence from the movie review BEST supports the conclusion that filmmakers value dramatic stories over accurate ones?
A
B
C
D

As the movie begins, we learn that a group of cowboys has been traveling on a cattle trail for many days in the late winter.
The truth is that the life of a cowboy was much more dangerous and exhausting than the movie shows. The next day, the cowboys in the movie get up and begin to prepare for the day ahead.
Cowboys sacrificed a great deal and often had to leave family behind.

Correct Answer: B
Explanation of Correct Answer: The correct answer is choice (B) The truth is that the life of a cowboy was much more dangerous and exhausting than the movie shows. This is the only sentence that explicitly compares the movie to reality, showing what the movie makers value. Choices (A) and (C) are incorrect because they only describe what happens in the movie and do not make a comparison with reality. Choice (D) is incorrect because it doesn't compare this reality with what the movie shows to prove that the moviemakers value drama.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Example Item 2
DOK Level: 3
English Language Arts (ELA) Grade 5 Content Domain: Reading and Vocabulary
Standard: ELACC5RI3. Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.
How did the reviewer's knowledge of the lives of real cowboys MOST LIKELY influence his or her opinion of the movie? Use details from the movie review to support your answer.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Example Item 2

Scoring Rubric
Points

2

1

0

Description
The response achieves the following:
 gives sufficient evidence of the ability to explain the relationships between ideas  includes specific examples/details that make clear reference to the text
 adequately explains the relationships between ideas with clearly relevant information based on the text
The response achieves the following:
 gives limited evidence of the ability to explain the relationships between ideas  includes vague/limited examples/details that make reference to the text
 explains the relationships between ideas with vague/limited information based on the text
The response achieves the following:
 gives no evidence of the ability to explain the relationships between ideas
OR
 explains the relationships between ideas, but includes no examples or no examples/details that make reference to the text
OR
 gives the relationships between ideas, but includes no explanation or no relevant information from the text

Exemplar Response
Points
Awarded

2

1
0

Response
The reviewer uses his or her knowledge about the real lives of cowboys to explain why the movie is unrealistic. He or she describes different moments in the movie and compares them to what really happened. For example, real cowboys had to stay up at night to make sure they and their animals were safe. The movie showed them getting a good night's rest. The movie also showed that a cowboy could travel alone, but the reviewer explains how a cowboy would probably die if he traveled alone.
The reviewer uses his or her knowledge about the real lives of cowboys to explain why the movie is unrealistic. He or she describes different moments in the movie and compares them to what really happened.
The reviewer compares what he or she knows about real cowboys to what happened in the movie.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Example Item 3
DOK Level: 4
English Language Arts (ELA) Grade 5 Content Domain: Writing and Language
Standard: ELACC5W2d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
In this section, you will read two student notices. You will write an informational essay detailing the similarities and differences in how the schools are described in each of them.
Before you begin planning and writing, read the two texts:
1. “The Center”
2. “School Pride Day”
As you read the texts, think about what details from the texts you might use in your informational essay. Georgia Department of Education
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The Center
The Student Greeting Committee welcomes you to Centerville!
Our Centerville School is proud to be located in the heart of Centerville. Students and teachers fondly call the school C-School, or just The Center. Because we are in the center of town, we do our best to make sure the school stands out as clean, fun, and friendly. In fact, one of our biggest after-school clubs is the School Clean-Up Crew. This “crew” keeps the school clean and welcoming, inside and out.
Sports are popular here. It is hard to choose from all that is offered, but the most popular sport is basketball. It’s also fun to play or watch the basketball games, especially when we play Grant School.
They are our biggest “enemy” on the court. Though we say we are enemies, really it is just for fun.
Our school mascot is a great white shark named Jaws. He comes out to every event to cheer on the school. Kids love trying out to be the mascot. There are try-outs at the beginning of each semester.
Lots of students hope for the opportunity to wear the Jaws costume at school events.
The cafeteria at The Center has a good selection. Every day, students can select from two different meals. Generally, the meal listed first on the menu board is the most popular. The second meal listed is usually something that most kids would not eat. Every other Friday, we have pizza day. Every student loves this day. Pizza and salad are brought in from a local pizzeria, and the cafeteria turns into a pizza party.
The school is pretty crowded, so at recess and on the way to lunch, it can be crazy in the hallways. It is best to plan ahead so that you can just go with the flow of traffic rather than having to go against the stream of students.
We know you will enjoy being a student at Centerville School. It won’t take long for you to feel like you are part of The Center.
School Pride Day
School Pride Day is coming up, and our school has a lot to be proud of. From sports to music, we have it all. Come help us celebrate all the things we do best.
For starters, our school chess team took the top prize at this year’s Champion Chess Tournament. Not only did our chess team come in first place, but they also won the prize for being good sports. Smart on the chess board and kind on the sidelines. Way to go chess team!
Both our orchestra and our band have something to celebrate. The orchestra was asked to play at the
City Festival, and the mayor herself introduced them. Also, the school band is competing in a music competition at the end of the month. Congratulations to the orchestra and good luck to the band!
We all know that sports are a big part of our school. You can see that on game days when the students are all wearing their school T-shirts and jerseys in support of the teams. Even the teachers show their support by wearing their sweatshirts and school scarves.

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Congratulations to the volleyball and basketball teams for having their best season yet. And congratulations to all teams on the field and court for making our school proud.
When it comes to community support, we couldn’t be prouder. Our last school garage sale, held in our school parking lot, raised hundreds of dollars for the local food pantries. Thanks to the school families for giving the school so many wonderful things that we were able to help many community families in need.
New additions to the school are the mini-libraries at both entrances to the school. With the help of a local business, we built two mailbox-style libraries that hold books for children and adults alike. These books are available for anyone to take; just help yourself.
Show your school spirit and come out to celebrate School Pride Day with us. Learn about clubs and events that you can get involved in. Congratulate your peers and get involved!
Now that you have read “The Center” and “School Pride Day,” create a plan for your informational essay. Think about ideas, facts, definitions, details, and other information and examples you want to use.
Think about how you will introduce your topic and what the main topic will be for each paragraph. Be sure to identify the sources by title or number when using details or facts directly from the sources.
Write an informational essay detailing the similarities and differences in how the schools are described in each of them.
Now write your informational essay. Be sure to:
 Use information from the two texts so that your essay includes important details.
 Introduce the topic clearly, provide a focus, and organize information in a way that makes sense.  Develop the topic with facts, definitions, details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
 Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion.
 Clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
 Use clear language and vocabulary to inform about the topic.
 Provide a conclusion that follows the information presented.
 Check your work for correct usage, grammar, spelling, and capitalization.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
To view the seven point two-trait rubric for a text-based informational/explanatory response, see page
42.
Example of a 7-Point Response:
The two texts describe the school similarly, but there are also differences. The first text focuses more on introducing a student to things he or she should know about the school, while the second text focuses more on the accomplishments of the school.
The first text prepares a student for life in the school. It describes a favorite after-school club that cleans up the campus. It also talks about how popular the sports teams are and things to remember when using the cafeteria. It also prepares the student for how "crazy" it can be in the halls.
The second text is more focused on all of the things that the school has accomplished. It celebrates the chess team's win and the orchestra's recognitions. It describes the pride students and teachers have in the school, and it brags a bit about the community support and mini-libraries.
Both texts show the good things the school has to offer. They also introduce students to the school so that they will feel more comfortable.
While they focus on different things, the texts both represent the school positively.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
English Language Arts (ELA) Additional Sample Items
This section has two parts. The first part is a set of 10 sample items for the English Language Arts (ELA) portion of the EOG assessment. The second part contains a table that shows for each item the standard assessed, the DOK level, the correct answer (key), and a rationale/explanation about the key and distractors. The sample items can be utilized as a mini-test to familiarize students with the item formats found on the assessment. All example and sample items contained in this guide are the property of the
Georgia Department of Education.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Items 1 through 8
Use this passage to answer example items 1 through 8.
Buddy’s Trick
“Look, Buddy is napping on our couch again,” Angela said with a note of wonder to her brother,
Carlos.
Their neighbors, the Thortons, had a black cat named Buddy. Lately, Buddy kept appearing in the children’s house, but they did not know how he managed his mysterious trick.
Gently, Angela scooped up Buddy, and the sociable cat snuggled into her arms like a cozy stuffed animal. “Buddy’s tail has streaks of blue paint on it,” Angela noticed. “Dad is painting our house that color.
Maybe Dad left a window open and Buddy climbed inside.”
“Let’s go and check,” suggested Carlos. In a flash, he sprinted out of the house, eager to find an answer, but Angela followed slowly. What if we solve the mystery and end Buddy’s visits? I enjoy discovering him, Angela thought.
As Angela joined Carlos, he pointed to a ladder leaning against the house. The painted blue window above it was open. “Buddy must have climbed up the ladder and leaped through the window!” Carlos exclaimed. “He’s not an ordinary cat; he’s an acrobat!”
Angela thoughtfully stared at the ladder’s slippery metal rungs. “Buddy’s claws cannot grip those rungs,” she concluded.
A moment later, Dad’s head poked through the open window and ended their discussion. “I’ve been painting this room all morning,” he explained, “and no cat has crept by me.”
“Maybe there’s another open window,” Carlos declared. Before Angela could reply, he bolted off again like a runner at the sound of the starting pistol. When Angela caught up with him, he was resting on the front steps, his face sweaty.
“The other windows are closed,” Carlos reported, “but I can still solve this mystery.”
“How?” asked Angela, curious about her brother’s next plan. Carlos always had imaginative ideas.
“Buddy really likes you,” Carlos stated, staring at the contented cat in Angela’s arms. “If you go inside and call him, Buddy will want to come and see you. I’ll follow him and discover his secret entrance.”
“That’s a good idea,” Angela admitted. Reluctantly, she gently placed the cat in the grass and walked inside. Taking a deep breath, she began calling Buddy’s name.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Suddenly a black shadow streaked out of their basement and leaped into Angela’s arms. A moment later, a delighted Carlos exploded through the front door and joined them.
“Buddy found a loose board by our basement window,” Carlos said. “He lifted it with his paw and wiggled under it.”
“That explains the blue paint,” Angela stated. “Dad stores his leftover paint in the basement. When
Buddy slipped inside, he probably rubbed against a paint can.”
“I’m going to tell Dad about the loose board,” Carlos reported next, pleased at solving their mystery.
Angela sighed as the front door slammed behind Carlos. I guess the cat is out of the bag now, she thought. With heavy feet, Angela headed next door to take Buddy home.
Mr. Thorton was in his yard, frantically searching the bushes. When he spotted Angela and Buddy, he sighed with relief. “You’ve found my runaway cat!” Mr. Thorton cheered. “My wife’s out of town and
Buddy misses her. Whenever I work in the garden, Buddy mysteriously disappears.”
“He comes to visit us,” Angela replied. “Unfortunately, he rubbed against a paint can.”
“I can give him a bath,” Mr. Thorton chuckled. “I hope he’s not bothering you.”
“I love Buddy’s company,” Angela assured him. Suddenly a hopeful smile lit up her face. “If my father agrees, I could watch Buddy until your wife returns.”
“That would be wonderful,” said Mr. Thorton. “Then I could stop worrying about him.”
“I’m glad we solved your mystery,” Angela laughed as Buddy purred.

Item 1
Which statement from the story supports the idea that Carlos is determined?
A
B
C
D

"The other windows are closed," Carlos reported, "but I can still solve this mystery."
"Buddy really likes you," Carlos stated, staring at the contented cat in Angela's arms.
"Buddy found a loose board by our basement window," Carlos said. "He lifted it with his paw and wiggled under it."
"I'm going to tell Dad about the loose board," Carlos reported next, pleased at solving their mystery.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Item 2
Which conclusion can BEST be made based on this sentence from the story?
With heavy feet, Angela headed next door to take Buddy home.
A
B
C
D

Angela is curious.
Angela is nervous.
Angela is stubborn.
Angela is responsible.

Item 3
What is the theme of the story?
A
B
C
D

Cats can be sneaky animals.
Cats are interesting animals.
People should leave windows closed.
People can get answers if they are persistent.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Item 4
Compare Carlos's actions to Angela’s as they try to solve the mystery of Buddy the cat getting into their house. How do their actions differ? Use details from the story to support your answer.

Item 5
What does the phrase lit up her face mean in the sentence?
Suddenly a hopeful smile lit up her face.

A
B
C
D

made her face red made her skin glow made her look happy made her feel sweaty

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Item 6
What is the BEST meaning of the underlined phrase in the sentence?
I guess the cat is out of the bag now, she thought.

A
B
C
D

a pet is missed a bag is emptied a cat is discovered a secret is uncovered

Item 7
What is the meaning of the word frantically in the sentence?
Mr. Thorton was in his yard, frantically searching the bushes.

A
B
C
D

full of energy state of concern to make excited in a desperate way

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Item 8
Rewrite this part of the story using more descriptive details. Think about how Angela and Carlos felt, as well as what they saw, smelled, and heard.
“The other windows are closed,” Carlos reported, “but I can still solve this mystery.”
“How?” asked Angela, curious about her brother’s next plan. Carlos always had imaginative ideas.
“Buddy really likes you,” Carlos stated, staring at the contented cat in Angela’s arms. “If you go inside and call him, Buddy will want to come and see you. I’ll follow him and discover his secret entrance.” “That’s a good idea,” Angela admitted. Reluctantly, she gently placed the cat in the grass and walked inside. Taking a deep breath, she began calling Buddy’s name.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Items 9 and 10
In this section, you will read two student notices. You will write an informational essay detailing the similarities and differences in how each notice describes the schools.
Before you begin planning and writing, read the two texts:
1. “The Center”
2. “School Pride Day”
As you read the texts, think about what details from the texts you might use in your informational essay. The Center
The Student Greeting Committee welcomes you to Centerville!
Our Centerville School is proud to be located in the heart of Centerville. Students and teachers fondly call the school C-School, or just, The Center. Because we are in the center of town, we do our best to make sure the school stands out as clean, fun, and friendly. In fact, one of our biggest after-school clubs is the School Clean-Up Crew. This “crew” keeps the school clean and welcoming, inside and out.
Sports are popular here. It is hard to choose from all that is offered, but the most popular sport is basketball. It’s also fun to play or watch the basketball games, especially when we play Grant School.
They are our biggest “enemy” on the court. Though we say we are enemies, really it is just for fun.
Our school mascot is a great white shark named Jaws. He comes out to every event to cheer on the school. Kids love trying out to be the mascot. There are try-outs at the beginning of each semester.
Lots of students hope for the opportunity to wear the Jaws costume at school events.
The cafeteria at The Center has a good selection. Every day, students can select from two different meals. Generally, the meal listed first on the menu board is the most popular. The second meal listed is usually something that most kids would not eat. Every other Friday, we have pizza day. Every student loves this day. Pizza and salad are brought in from a local pizzeria, and the cafeteria turns into a pizza party.
The school is pretty crowded, so at recess and on the way to lunch, it can be crazy in the hallways. It is best to plan ahead so that you can just go with the flow of traffic rather than having to go against the stream of students.
We know you will enjoy being a student at Centerville School. It won’t take long for you to feel like you are part of The Center.
School Pride Day
School Pride Day is coming up, and our school has a lot to be proud of. From sports to music, we have it all. Come help us celebrate all the things we do best.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
For starters, our school chess team took the top prize at this year’s Champion Chess Tournament. Not only did our chess team come in first place, but also they won the prize for being good sports. Smart on the chess board and kind on the sidelines. Way to go chess team!
Both our orchestra and our band have something to celebrate. The orchestra was asked to play at the
City Festival, and the mayor herself introduced them. Also, the school band is competing in a music competition at the end of the month. Congratulations to the orchestra and good luck to the band!
We all know that sports are a big part of our school. You can see that on game days when the students are all wearing their school T-shirts and jerseys in support of the teams. Even the teachers show their support by wearing their sweatshirts and school scarves.
Congratulations to the volleyball and basketball teams for having their best season yet. And congratulations to all teams on the field and court for making our school proud.
When it comes to community support, we couldn’t be prouder. Our last school garage sale, held in our school parking lot, raised hundreds of dollars for the local food pantries. Thanks to the school families for giving the school so many wonderful things that we were able to help many community families in need.
New additions to the school are the mini-libraries at both entrances to the school. With the help of a local business, we built two mailbox-style libraries that hold books for children and adults alike. These books are available for anyone to take; just help yourself.
Show your school spirit and come out to celebrate School Pride Day with us. Learn about clubs and events that you can get involved in. Congratulate your peers and get involved!

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Item 9
What is the central idea of BOTH passages? Use details from both passages to support your answer.

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Item 10
Now that you have read “The Center” and “School Pride Day” and answered a question about what you read, create a plan for your informational essay.
Think about ideas, facts, definitions, details, and other information and examples you want to use.
Think about how you will introduce your topic and what the main topic will be for each paragraph. Be sure to identify the sources by title or number when using details or facts directly from the sources.
Write an informational essay detailing the similarities and differences in how the schools are described in each of them.
Now write your informational essay. Be sure to:
 Use information from the two texts so that your essay includes important details.
 Introduce the topic clearly, provide a focus, and organize information in a way that makes sense.  Develop the topic with facts, definitions, details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
 Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion.
 Clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
 Use clear language and vocabulary to inform about the topic.
 Provide a conclusion that follows the information presented.
 Check your work for correct usage, grammar, spelling, and capitalization.

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English Language Arts (ELA) Additional Sample Item Keys
Item

Standard/
Element

DOK Level

Correct
Answer

1

ELACC5RL1

2

A

2

ELACC5RL1

3

D

3

ELACC5RL2

3

D

4

ELACC5RL3

3

N/A

5

ELACC5RL4

3

C

Explanation
The correct answer is choice (A) "The other windows are closed," Carlos reported, "but I can still solve this mystery." Carlos clearly shows confidence in his own abilities, revealing his determination. Choice (B) is incorrect because Carlos is making an observation about
Buddy, not showing that he is determined.
Choice (C) is incorrect because it reveals
Buddy's cleverness, not Carlos' determination.
Choice (D) is incorrect because it shows that
Carlos is content with himself, not that he is determined to do something.
The correct answer is choice (D) Angela is responsible. Even though she wants to keep playing with Buddy, she does the right thing and takes him back where he belongs. Choices
(A), (B), and (C) are incorrect because Angela is not showing curiosity, nervousness, or stubbornness here; she is showing sadness.
The correct answer is choice (D) People can get answers if they are persistent. Carlos and
Angela are determined to find out how Buddy keeps getting into their house, so they keep searching and asking questions until they find out. Choices (A) and (B) are incorrect because the central focus of the story is not on cats, but on solving a mystery. Choice (C) is incorrect because Buddy doesn't use the window to enter the house, so open windows are not a problem. See scoring rubric and exemplar responses on page 36.
The correct answer is choice (C) made her look happy. This expression is used to show that someone is delighted or excited about something. Choices (A) and (B) are incorrect because they are literal interpretations and do not express the meaning of the phrase. Choice
(D) is incorrect because nothing in the sentence suggests that Angela is sweaty.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)

Item

Standard/
Element

DOK Level

Correct
Answer

6

ELACC5L5b

3

D

7

ELACC5L4b

2

D

8

ELACC5W3d

4

N/A

9

ELACC5RI2

3

N/A

10

ELACC5W2d

4

N/A

Explanation
The correct answer is choice (D) a secret is uncovered. Angela thinks this directly after she and Carlos finally solve the mystery of how
Buddy enters their house, so the phrase means that a secret is revealed. Choice (A) is incorrect because Angela isn't missing Buddy here.
Choice (B) is incorrect because Buddy was not found in a bag. Choice (C) is incorrect because the phrase does not typically refer to an actual cat. The correct answer is choice (D) in a desperate way. Mr. Thorton, Buddy's owner, is very worried about his pet, so he desperately searches for him. Choice (A) is incorrect because "frantically" describes an emotion, not energy levels. Choice (B) is incorrect because
Mr. Thorton is past concern at this point; he is very worried. Choice (C) is incorrect because
Mr. Thorton isn't exciting anyone in his search.
See exemplar responses beginning on page 37 and the four point holistic rubric on page 41.
See scoring rubric and exemplar responses beginning on page 38.
See exemplar response on page 39 and the seven point two-trait rubric beginning on page
42.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
English Language Arts (ELA) Example Scoring Rubrics and Exemplar Responses
Item 4

Scoring Rubric
Points

2

1

0

Description
The response achieves the following:
 gives sufficient evidence of the ability to compare characters’ actions
 includes specific examples/details that make clear reference to the text
 adequately explains how each character's actions differ from one another with clearly relevant information based on the text
The response achieves the following:
 gives limited evidence of the ability to compare characters’ actions
 includes vague/limited examples/details that make reference to the text
 explains how each character's actions differ from one another with vague/limited information based on the text
The response achieves the following:
 gives no evidence of the ability to compare characters’ actions
OR
 compares characters’ actions, but includes no examples or no examples/details that make reference to the text
OR
 compares characters’ actions, but includes no explanation or no relevant information from the text

Exemplar Response
Points
Awarded
2

1
0

Response
Carlos’s actions are more urgent than Angela’s. He seems more excited. Angela seems curious about the situation but doesn’t feel as driven to find the answers. Carlos “bolted off again like a runner” while Angela “reluctantly . . . placed the cat in the grass and walked inside.”
Carlos’s actions are more urgent than Angela’s. He runs around, doing things to find out how the cat gets inside. Angela is curious but not as interested as Carlos.
Carlos makes things happen in the story.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Item 8
To view the four point holistic rubric for a text-based narrative response, see page 41.

Exemplar Response
Points
Awarded

Response
"The other windows are tightly closed. I can't budge them, so I doubt Buddy could have opened them," Carlos reported. He tapped his foot on the ground and said, "But I can still solve this mystery."
Angela stroked Buddy's soft fur and felt the vibrations of his purr under her hand. "How?" she asked, extremely curious about her brother's next plan. Carlos always had the most imaginative and brilliant ideas.

4
"Buddy really likes you," Carlos stated, reaching out to scratch the cat behind the ears. "If you go inside and call him sweetly, Buddy will run quickly to come and see you. I'll creep behind him and discover his secret entrance."
"That's a good idea," Angela sadly admitted. She didn't really want to find out how
Buddy got in, but she reluctantly set him gently in the fresh-smelling grass. She walked inside, took a deep breath, and began calling Buddy's name.
"The other windows are tightly closed. I can't budge them," Carlos reported. He tapped his foot on the ground and said, "But I can still solve this mystery."
Angela stroked Buddy's soft fur and felt the vibrations of his purr under her hand. "How?" she asked, curious about her brother's next plan. Carlos always had the most imaginative ideas. 3

"Buddy really likes you," Carlos stated. "If you go inside and call him sweetly, Buddy will run to come and see you. I'll creep behind him and discover his secret entrance."
"That's a good idea," Angela sadly admitted. She reluctantly set him gently in the fresh smelling grass.
She walked inside, took a deep breath, and began calling Buddy's name.
"The other windows are closed. I can't move them. Buddy could not open them," Carlos said. He thought to himself. He said, "But I can still solve this mystery."

2

Angela pet Buddy. "How?" she asked. Carlos had good ideas.
"Buddy likes you," Carlos stated. "Call him. I'll follow him"
"That's a good idea," Angela said. She set Buddy down and began calling his name.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Item 8

Exemplar Response – continued
Points
Awarded

Response
The windows are super closed. I can still find out what happens, Carlos said.
Angela pet the cat. How? she asked.

1
Carlos said for her to call Buddy and that he'd come to her.
Angela put him down and said his name.
Carlos and Angela found out where Buddy came from.

0

Item 9

Scoring Rubric
Points

2

1

0

Description
The response achieves the following:
 gives sufficient evidence of the ability to determine/summarize the central idea of two texts and to explain the support for a central idea
 includes specific examples/details that make clear reference to the texts
 adequately explains the central idea and gives an explanation with clearly relevant information based on the texts
The response achieves the following:
 gives limited evidence of the ability to determine the central idea of two texts or to explain the support for a central idea
 includes vague/limited examples/details that make reference to the texts
 explains the central idea or gives an explanation with vague/limited information based on the texts
The response achieves the following:
 gives no evidence of the ability to determine the central idea of two texts or to explain the support for a central idea
OR
 gives the central idea or an explanation for one or both texts, but includes no examples or no examples/details that make reference to the texts
OR
 gives the central idea for one or both texts, but includes no explanation or no relevant information from the texts

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Item 9

Exemplar Response
Points
Awarded

2

1
0

Response
The central idea of the texts is to explain to new students details about the school. The first text describes the sports offered, such as basketball, and includes information about the school's mascot. It also talks about the cafeteria. The second text describes all of the fun activities and successes of the school. It mentions the chess team's first place finish, as well as the garage sale that raised hundreds of dollars.
The central idea of the texts is to explain to new students details about the school, including how good the cafeteria is and how much money was raised at the garage sale.
The central idea is that the school is fun.

Item 10
To view the seven point two-trait rubric for a text-based informational/explanatory response, see page
42.
Example of a 7-Point Response:
The two texts describe the school similarly, but there are also differences. The first text focuses more on introducing a student to things he or she should know about the school, while the second text focuses more on the accomplishments of the school.
The first text prepares a student for life in the school. It describes a favorite after-school club that cleans up the campus. It also talks about how popular the sports teams are and things to remember when using the cafeteria. It also prepares the student for how "crazy" it can be in the halls.
The second text is more focused on all of the things that the school has accomplished. It celebrates the chess team's win and the orchestra's recognitions. It describes the pride students and teachers have in the school, and it brags a bit about the community support and mini-libraries.
Both texts show the good things the school has to offer. They also introduce students to the school so that they will feel more comfortable.
While they focus on different things, the texts both represent the school positively.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
English Language Arts (ELA) Writing Rubrics
English Language Arts (ELA) items that are not machine scored—i.e., constructed-response, extended constructed-response, and extended writing-response items—are manually scored using either a holistic rubric or a two-trait rubric.
Four Point Holistic Rubric
Genre: Narrative
A holistic rubric essentially has one main criterion. On the Georgia Milestones EOG assessment, a holistic rubric contains a single point scale ranging from zero to four. Each point value represents a qualitative description of the student’s work. To score an item on a holistic rubric, the scorer or reader need only choose the description and associated point value that best represents the student’s work. Increasing point values represent a greater understanding of the content and, thus, a higher score.
Seven Point Two-Trait Rubric
Genre: Informational/Explanatory or Opinion
A two-trait rubric, on the other hand, is an analytic rubric with two criteria, or traits. On the Georgia
Milestones EOG assessment, a two-trait rubric contains two point scales for each trait ranging from zero to four on one scale and zero to three on the other. A score is given for each of the two criteria/traits, for a total of seven possible points for the item. To score an item on a two-trait rubric, a scorer or reader must choose the description and associated point value for each criteria/trait that best represents the student’s work. The two scores are added together. Increasing point values represent a greater understanding of the content and, thus, a higher score.
On the following pages are the rubrics that will be used to evaluate writing on the Georgia Milestones
Grade 5 English Language Arts (ELA) EOG assessment.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Four Point Holistic Rubric
Genre: Narrative
Description

Points

Criteria

The student’s response is a well-developed narrative that fully develops a real or imagined experience based on a text as a stimulus.

Effectively establishes a situation and introduces a narrator and/or characters

Organizes an event sequence that unfolds naturally

Effectively uses narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing to develop rich, interesting experiences and events and show the responses of characters to situations

Uses a variety of words and phrases consistently to signal the sequence of events

Uses concrete words, phrases, and sensory language consistently to convey experiences events precisely

Provides a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events

Integrates ideas and details from source material effectively

Has very few or no errors in usage and/or conventions that interfere with meaning*
The student’s response is a complete narrative that develops a real or imagined experience based on a text as a
3
stimulus.

Establishes a situation and introduces one or more characters

Organizes events in a clear, logical order
The Narrative

Uses narrative techniques, such as dialogue and description to develop experiences and events and show writing task the responses of characters to situations examines the

Uses words and/or phrases to indicate sequence writer’s ability to

Uses words, phrases, and details to convey experiences and events effectively develop

Provides an appropriate conclusion real or imagined

Integrates some ideas and/or details from source material

Has little or no errors in usage and/or conventions that interfere with meaning* experiences or
The student’s response is an incomplete or oversimplified narrative based on a text as a stimulus.
2
events using

Introduces a vague situation and at least one character effective 
Organizes events in a sequence but with some gaps or ambiguity techniques, 
Attempts to use a narrative technique, such as dialogue and description to develop experiences and events descriptive details, and show the responses of characters to situations and clear event

Uses occasional signal words to indicate sequence sequences based

Uses some words or phrases inconsistently to convey experiences and events on a text that has

Provides a weak or ambiguous conclusion been read.

Attempts to integrate ideas or details from source material

Has frequent errors in usage and conventions that sometimes interfere with meaning*
The student’s response provides evidence of an attempt to write a narrative based on a text as a stimulus.
1

Provides a weak or minimal introduction of a situation or a character

May be too brief to demonstrate a complete sequence of events

Shows little or no attempt to use dialogue or description to develop experiences and events and show the responses of characters to situations

Uses words that are inappropriate, overly simple, or unclear

Provides few if any words that convey experiences and events

Provides a minimal or no conclusion

May use few if any ideas or details from source material

Has frequent major errors in usage and conventions that interfere with meaning*

The response is completely irrelevant or incorrect, or there is no response.
0

The student merely copies the text in the prompt.

The student copies so much text from the passages that there is not sufficient original work to be scored.
*Students are responsible for language conventions learned in their current grade as well as in prior grades. Refer to the language skills for each grade to determine the grade-level expectations for grammar, syntax, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling. Also refer to the Progressive Skills chart for those standards that need continued attention beyond the grade in which they were introduced.

4

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Seven Point Two-Trait Rubric
Trait 1 for Informational/Explanatory Genre
Description

Points

Criteria

4

The student’s response is a well-developed informative/explanatory text that examines a topic in depth and conveys ideas and information clearly based on text as a stimulus.

Effectively introduces a topic

Effectively develops the topic with multiple facts, definitions, and examples related to the topic 
Groups related ideas together logically to give some organization to the writing

Effectively uses linking words and phrases to connect ideas within and across categories of information 
Uses precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to explain the topic

Provides a strong concluding statement or section
The student’s response is a complete informative/explanatory text that examines a topic and presents information.

Introduces a topic

Develops the topic with some facts, definitions, and details

Groups some related ideas together to give partial organization to the writing

Uses some linking words to connect ideas within and across categories of information, but relationships may not always be clear

Uses some precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to explain the topic

Provides a concluding statement or section
The student’s response is an incomplete or oversimplified informative/explanatory text that cursorily examines a topic.

Attempts to introduce a topic

Attempts to develop a topic with too few details

Attempts to group some related ideas together

Uses few linking words to connect ideas, but not all ideas are well connected to the topic

Uses limited language and vocabulary that does not clearly explain the topic

Provides a weak concluding statement or section
The student’s response is a weak attempt to write an essay that examines a topic.

May not introduce a topic or topic is unclear

May not develop a topic

May be too brief to group any related ideas together

May not use any linking words to connect ideas

Uses vague, ambiguous, or repetitive language

Provides a minimal or no concluding statement or section

The response is completely irrelevant or incorrect, or there is no response.

The student merely copies the text in the prompt.

The student copies so much text from the passages that there is not sufficient original work to be scored.

Idea Development,
Organization, and
Coherence
This trait contributes 4 of 7 points to the score for this genre and examines the writer’s ability to effectively establish a controlling topic and to support the topic with evidence from the text(s) read and to elaborate on the topic with examples, illustrations, facts, and other details. The writer must integrate the information from the text(s) into his/her own words and arrange the ideas and supporting evidence in order to create cohesion for an informative/explanatory essay.

3

2

1

0

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Seven Point Two-Trait Rubric
Trait 2 for Informational/Explanatory Genres
Description

Points

Criteria

The student’s response demonstrates full command of language usage and conventions.

Effectively expands, combines, and reduces sentences for meaning, reader/listener interest,
Language Usage and and style
Conventions

Shows command of language and its conventions when writing

Any errors in usage and conventions do not interfere with meaning*
This trait contributes 3 of 7
The student’s response demonstrates partial command of language usage and conventions.
2
points for this genre and

Expands, combines, and reduces some sentences for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style examines the writer’s ability

Shows some knowledge of language and its conventions when writing to demonstrate control of

Has minor errors in usage and conventions with no significant effect on meaning* sentence formation, usage,
The student’s response demonstrates weak command of language usage and conventions.
1
and mechanics as embodied

Uses simple sentence structure and does not expand, combine, and reduce sentences

Shows little knowledge of language and its conventions when writing in the grade-level

Has frequent errors in usage and conventions that interfere with meaning* expectations of the

The student's response has many errors that affect the overall meaning, or the response is
0
language standards. too brief to determine a score.

The student copies so much text from the passages that there is not sufficient original work to be scored.
*Students are responsible for language conventions learned in their current grade as well as in prior grades. Refer to the language skills for each grade to determine the grade-level expectations for grammar, syntax, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling. Also refer to the Progressive Skills chart for those standards that need continued attention beyond the grade in which they were introduced.

3

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Seven Point Two-Trait Rubric
Trait 1 for Opinion Genre
Description

Points

Idea Development,
Organization, and
Coherence

4

The student’s response is a well-developed opinion piece that effectively relates and supports a point of view based on text as a stimulus.

Effectively introduces a topic and clearly states an opinion

Creates an organizational structure to group the reasons logically

Effectively develops the reasons that are supported by facts and details

Uses words, phrases, and clauses effectively to link opinion and reasons

Provides a strong concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented

3

The student’s response is a complete opinion piece that examines a topic and presents a point of view based on the text.

Introduces a topic and states an opinion

Provides some structure to organize reasons

Develops the topic and supports the opinion with facts and details

Uses some words, phrases, and clauses to link opinion and reasons

Provides a concluding statement or section

2

The student’s response is an incomplete or oversimplified opinion piece that examines a topic and partially supports a point of view.

Attempts to introduce a topic and state an opinion

Attempts to provide structure to organize reasons, but structure is inconsistent

Attempts to develop the topic and support the opinion with details sometimes

Uses few words, phrases, or clauses to link opinion and reasons

Provides a weak concluding statement or section

1

The student’s response is a weak attempt to write an opinion piece that examines a topic and does not support a point of view.

May not introduce a topic and/or state an opinion

May not use structure to organize ideas

May not develop the topic or support the opinion

May not use words or phrases to link opinion and reasons

Provides a minimal or no concluding statement or section

0





This trait contributes 4 of 7 points to the score for this genre and examines the writer’s ability to effectively establish a claim as well as to address counterclaims, to support the claim with evidence from the text(s) read, and to elaborate on the claim with examples, illustrations, facts, and other details.
The writer must integrate the information from the text(s) into his/her own words and arrange the ideas and supporting evidence in order to create cohesion for an argumentative essay.

Criteria

The response is completely irrelevant or incorrect, or there is no response.
The student merely copies the text in the prompt.
The student copies so much text from the passages that there is not sufficient original work to be scored. Georgia Department of Education
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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | English Language Arts (ELA)
Seven Point Two-Trait Rubric
Trait 2 for Opinion Genre
Description

Points

Criteria

The student’s response demonstrates full command of language usage and conventions.

Effectively expands, combines, and reduces sentences for meaning, reader/listener interest,
Language Usage and and style
Conventions

Shows command of language and its conventions when writing

Any errors in usage and conventions do not interfere with meaning*
This trait contributes 3 of 7
The student’s response demonstrates partial command of language usage and conventions.
2
points for this genre and

Expands, combines, and reduces some sentences for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style examines the writer’s ability

Shows some knowledge of language and its conventions when writing to demonstrate control of

Has minor errors in usage and conventions with no significant effect on meaning* sentence formation, usage,
The student’s response demonstrates weak command of language usage and conventions.
1
and mechanics as embodied

Uses simple sentence structure and does not expand, combine, and reduce sentences

Shows little knowledge of language and its conventions when writing in the grade-level

Has frequent errors in usage and conventions that interfere with meaning* expectations of the

The student's response has many errors that affect the overall meaning, or the response is
0
language standards. too brief to determine a score.

The student copies so much text from the passages that there is not sufficient original work to be scored.
*Students are responsible for language conventions learned in their current grade as well as in prior grades. Refer to the language skills for each grade to determine the grade-level expectations for grammar, syntax, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling. Also refer to the Progressive Skills chart for those standards that need continued attention beyond the grade in which they were introduced.

3

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics

MATHEMATICS
Description of Test Format and Organization
The Georgia Milestones EOG assessment is primarily a criterion-referenced test, designed to provide information about how well a student has mastered the grade-level state-adopted content standards in
Mathematics. Each student will receive one of four proficiency levels, depending on how well the student has mastered the content standards. In addition to criterion-referenced information, the
Georgia Milestones measures will also include a limited sample of nationally norm-referenced items to provide a signal of how Georgia students are achieving relative to their peers nationally. The normreferenced information provided is supplementary to the criterion-referenced proficiency designation and will not be utilized in any manner other than to serve as a barometer of national comparison. Only the criterion-referenced scores and proficiency designations will be utilized in the accountability metrics associated with the assessment program (such as student growth measures, educator effectiveness measures, or the CCRPI).
The Grade 5 Mathematics EOG assessment consists of a total of 73 items, 64 of which are operational items (and contribute to a student’s criterion-referenced and/or norm-referenced score) and 9 of which are field test items (newly written items that are being tried out and do not contribute to the student’s score). The criterion-referenced score, and proficiency designation, is comprised of 53 items, for a total of 58 points. Students will respond to a variety of item types, including selected-response, constructedresponse, and extended constructed-response items. Of the 64 operational items, 20 will be normreferenced and will provide a national comparison in the form of a national percentile rank. Nine of the items have been verified as aligned to the course content standards by Georgia educators and will therefore contribute to the criterion-referenced proficiency designation. The other 11 items will contribute only to the national percentile rank and be provided as supplemental information. Only items that are aligned to the state-adopted content standards will be utilized to inform the criterionreferenced score.
With the inclusion of the norm-referenced items, students may encounter items for which they have not received direct instruction. These items will not contribute to the student’s criterion-referenced proficiency designation; only items that align to the course content standards will contribute to the criterion-referenced score. Students should be instructed to try their best should they ask about an item that is not aligned to the content they have learned as part of the course.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
Grade 5 Mathematics EOG Assessment Design
Description

Number of
Items

Points for CR1 Score

Points for NRT2
Feedback

CR Selected-Response Items

41

41

0

NRT Selected-Response Items

203

94

20

CR Constructed-Response Items

3

8

0

CR Field Test Items

9

0

0

Total Items/Points5

73

58

20

1CR—Criterion-Referenced:
2NRT—Norm-Referenced

items aligned to state-adopted content standards
Test: items that will yield a national comparison; may or may not be aligned to state-adopted content

standards
3Of these items, 9 will contribute to both the CR scores and NRT feedback. The other 11 of these items will contribute to NRT feedback only and will not impact the student’s proficiency designation, scale score, or grade conversion.
4Alignment of national NRT items to course content standards was verified by a committee of Georgia educators. Only approved, aligned NRT items will contribute to a student’s CR proficiency designation, scale score, and grade conversion score.
5Total number of items contributing to CR score: 53; total points: 58; total number of items contributing to NRT feedback: 20; total points: 20

The test will be given in two sections. Section 1 is divided into two parts. Students may have up to 80 minutes per section to complete Sections 1 and 2. The total estimated testing time for the Grade 5
Mathematics EOG assessment ranges from approximately 120 to 160 minutes. Total testing time describes the amount of time students have to complete the assessment. It does not take into account the time required for the test examiner to complete pre-administration and post-administration activities (such as reading the standardized directions to students). Sections 1 and 2 must be scheduled to be administered on the same day in one test session following the district’s testing protocols for the
EOG measures (in keeping with state guidance).

Content Measured
The Grade 5 Mathematics assessment will measure the standards that are enumerated for Grade 5 as described on www.georgiastandards.org.
The content of the assessment is organized into five groupings, or domains, of standards for the purposes of providing feedback on student performance. A content domain is a reporting category that broadly describes and defines the content of the course, as measured by the EOG assessment. The standards for Grade 5 Mathematics are grouped into five domains: Operations and Algebraic Thinking,
Number and Operations in Base 10, Number and Operations—Fractions, Measurement and Data, and
Geometry. Each domain was created by organizing standards that share similar content characteristics.
The content standards describe the level of expertise that Grade 5 Mathematics educators should strive to develop in their students. Educators should refer to the content standards for a full understanding of the knowledge, concepts, and skills subject to be assessed on the EOG assessment.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
The approximate proportional number of points associated with each domain is shown in the following table. A range of cognitive levels will be represented on the Grade 5 Mathematic s EOG assessment.
Educators should always use the content standards when planning instruction.

Grade 5 Mathematics: Domain Structures and Content Weights
Domain

Standard

Approximate
Weight

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

MCC5OA1
MCC5OA2
MCC5OA3

10%

Number and Operations in Base 10

Number and Operations—Fractions

Measurement and Data

Geometry

MCC5NBT1
MCC5NBT2
MCC5NBT3
MCC5NBT4
MCC5NF1
MCC5NF2
MCC5NF3
MCC5NF4
MCC5MD1
MCC5MD2
MCC5MD3

MCC5NBT5
MCC5NBT6
MCC5NBT7
MCC5NF5
MCC5NF6
MCC5NF7

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30%

MCC5MD4
MCC5MD5
MCC5G1
MCC5G2
MCC5G3
MCC5G4

25%

20%

15%

Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
Item Types
The Mathematics portion of the Grade 5 EOG assessment consists of selected-response, constructedresponse, and extended constructed-response items.
A selected-response item, sometimes called a multiple-choice item, is defined as a question, problem, or statement that appears on a test followed by several answer choices, sometimes called options or response choices. The incorrect choices, called distractors, usually reflect common errors. The student’s task is to choose, from the alternatives provided, the best answer to the question posed in the stem (the question). The Mathematics selected-response items will have four answer choices.
A constructed-response item asks a question and solicits the student to provide a response he or she constructs on his or her own, as opposed to selecting from options provided. The constructed-response items on the EOG assessment will be worth two points. Partial credit may be awarded.
An extended constructed-response item is a specific type of constructed-response item that elicits a longer, more detailed response from the student than a two-point constructed-response item. The extended constructed-response items on the EOG assessment will be worth four points. Partial credit may be awarded.

Mathematics Example Items
Example items, which are representative of three DOK levels across various Grade 5 Mathematics content domains, are provided on the following pages. All example and sample items contained in this guide are the property of the Georgia Department of Education.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
Example Item 1
DOK Level: 1
Mathematics Grade 5 Content Domain: Measurement and Data
Standard: CCGPS5MD3. Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement. a. A cube with side length 1 unit, called a "unit cube," is said to have "one cubic unit" of volume, and can be used to measure volume.
Which statement about a unit cube is true?
A
B
C
D

It is a cube with a base perimeter of 1 unit.
It is a cube with a side length of 1 square unit.
It can be used to measure the area of a rectangle.
It can be used to measure the volume of a rectangular prism.

Correct Answer: D
Explanation of Correct Answer: The correct answer is choice (D) It can be used to measure the volume of a rectangular prism. A unit cube has a volume of 1 cubic unit and the volume of a right rectangular prism can be found by counting the number of unit cubes it contains. Choices (A) and (B) are incorrect because they use an incorrect definition of a unit cube. Choice (C) is incorrect because area cannot be measured with unit cubes.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
Example Item 2
DOK Level: 2
Mathematics Grade 5 Content Domain: Numbers and Operations in Base 10
Standard: CCGPS5NBT2. Explain patterns in the number of zeroes of the product when multiplying a number by powers of 10, and explain patterns in the placement of the decimal point when a decimal is multiplied or divided by a power of 10. Use whole-number exponents to denote powers of 10.
Look at the table.

Based on the pattern, what must 1.973 be multiplied by to get 19,730,000.0?
A
B
C
D

105
106
107
108

Correct Answer: C
Explanation of Correct Answer: The correct answer is choice (C) 107. The pattern shows that the decimal point moves 1 place to the right when the exponent increases by 1. Compared to the last row of the table, the decimal point must be moved 3 more places to the right to get 19,730,000.0, so the exponent needs to be increased by 3. Choices (A), (B), and (C) are incorrect because they move the decimal point an incorrect number of places.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
Example Item 3
DOK Level: 3
Mathematics Grade 5 Content Domain: Numbers and Operations – Fractions
Standard: CCGPS5NF2. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same whole, including cases of unlike denominators, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem. Use benchmark fractions and number sense of fractions to estimate mentally and assess the reasonableness of answers. For example, recognize an incorrect result
2
5

+

1
2

=

3
7

, by observing that

3
7

1
2

< .

At Wildlife Junction Petting Zoo, of the zoo is used for animal and bird exhibits, of the zoo is used for the children’s play area, and the remaining space is used for the ticket counter and the food court.

Does it make sense to say that that of the zoo is used for the animal and bird exhibits and the children’s play area combined?
3
7

1
4

A

It makes sense because is greater than .

B

It does not make sense because is less than .

C

It does not make sense because 3 is close to 1 and 4 is close to 2 so the sum should be close to 1 2.

D

It makes sense because 3 is close to 2 and 4 is close to 2 so the sum should be close to 2.

3
7

2
3

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Correct Answer: B
3

2

Explanation of Correct Answer: The correct answer is choice (B) It makes sense because 7 is less than 3.
2

Since 3 of the zoo is used for animal and bird exhibits, the part of the zoo used for animal and bird
2

exhibits and the children's play area must be greater than 3. Choice (A) is incorrect because it does not consider the part of the zoo used for exhibits. Choice (C) is incorrect because it makes incorrect comparisons of the addends to benchmark fractions. Choice (D) is incorrect because it makes comparisons of the addends to the benchmark fractions and incorrectly adds.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
Mathematics Additional Sample Items
This section has two parts. The first part is a set of 10 sample items for the Mathematics portion of the
EOG assessment. The second part contains a table that shows for each item the standard assessed, the
DOK level, the correct answer (key), and a rationale/explanation about the key and distractors. The sample items can be utilized as a mini-test to familiarize students with the item formats found on the assessment. All example and sample items contained in this guide are the property of the Georgia
Department of Education.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
Item 1
Look at the combined input-output table.
Input
1
2
3
4

Output A
2
4
6
8

Output B
4
8
12
16

Which set of rules was used to create this combined input-output table?
Output A
Output = Input + 1
Output A
Output = Input + 1

C

D

Output B
Output = (Input x 2) + 2

Output A
Output = Input x 2

B

Output B
Output = (Input + 2) x 2

Output A
Output = Input x 2

A

Output B
Output = (Input + 1) + 2

Output B
Output = (Input x 2) x 2

Item 2
Look at the inequality.
4.506 < □
Which number belongs in the box to make this inequality true?
A
B
C
D

4.5
4.6
4.05
4.46

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
Item 3
Sasha measured 0.2467 decimeter of rain in one month. She correctly rounded that number to the nearest hundredth.
Which number is her answer?
A
B
C
D

0.24
0.246
0.247
0.25

Item 4

At a farm, of the total area is covered by a pumpkin patch and

of the total area is covered by a

cornfield.
What fraction of the total area of the farm is covered by the pumpkin patch and the cornfield combined? A

4
20

B

7
25

C

7
20

D

16
20

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
Item 5
The picture shows the amount, in liters, of a sugar solution that Adam prepared.

He poured equal amounts of the solution into 3 beakers as shown.

Which expression is equal to the amount, in liters, of sugar solution in each beaker?
A

3 ÷

B

1
2

C

3 ×

D

1
6

1
6

÷ 3
1
2

× 3

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
Item 6
Students at a school collected samples of rainwater at different locations outside the school. The table shows the amounts, in ounces, of the different samples collected.

Which line plot represents the data in this table?

A

B

C

D

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
Item 7
The picture shows a microwave oven in a dollhouse.

The volume of this microwave oven is 60cm3.
What is the height of this microwave oven?
A
B
C
D

2 cm
4 cm
45 cm
52 cm

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
Item 8
Tony uses two short straws and two long straws to form the figure shown.

Replacing the straw from P to Q with a shorter straw, Tony creates a new figure. Which of these could be Tony’s new figure?
A
B
C
D

square rhombus trapezoid rectangle Item 9

The hardware store is mile from Sara's house. She walks of the way from her house to the hardware store and then turns around and walks back home.
How many miles does Sara walk? Show your work and write your answer in the space provided.
_______ mile(s)

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
Item 10
Addie is beginning a running program. She tracks the number of miles she runs 5 different days during a 10-day period.

Part A: What are the coordinates for point A?
__________
Part B: Which point represents day 5, when Addie ran 3 miles?
__________
Part C: Describe the distance Addie ran from days 1 to 5.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
Mathematics Additional Sample Item Keys
Item

Standard/
Element

DOK Level

Correct
Answer

1

5OA3

2

D

2

5NBT3b

1

B

3

5NBT4

1

D

Explanation
The correct answer is choice (D). For each input, Output A is twice that value, and Output
B is twice the value of Output A. Choices (A),
(B), and (C) are incorrect because they are true for Input 1 only.
The correct answer is choice (B) 4.6. The ones digits are equal. The tenths digit in 4.6 is 6. The tenths digit in 4.506 is 5. Since 5 < 6, 4.506 <
4.6. Choices (A) and (D) are incorrect because they do not consider all of the digits. Choice (C) is incorrect because it does not consider the direction of the inequality.
The correct answer is choice (D) 0.25. The digit in the thousandths place is greater than 5, so round up to the next hundredth by increasing the digit in the hundredths place by 1. Choice
(A) is incorrect because it rounds the hundredths place down instead of up. Choices
(B) and (C) are incorrect because they write the decimal to the thousandths place.
16

4

5NF2

2

D

The correct answer is choice (D) . The
20
common denominator of 5 and 20 is 20. Write each fraction with the common denominator
12
4
16
and add the numerators: 20 + 20 = 20 . Choice
(A) is incorrect because it is the fraction of the farm that is not covered by the pumpkin or corn. Choice (B) is incorrect because it the result of adding the numerators and denominators. Choice (C) is incorrect because it is the result of adding the first numerator to the second denominator and keeping the second denominator.

B

The correct answer is choice (B) 2 ÷ 3. Choice
(A) is incorrect because it divides the number of beakers by the amount of solution in each beaker. Choice (C) is incorrect because it multiplies the number of beakers by the total amount of solution. Choice (D) is incorrect because it multiplies the amount of solution in each beaker by the number of beakers.

1

5

5NF7a

2

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics

Item

Standard/
Element

DOK Level

Correct
Answer

Explanation
The correct answer is choice (A). In the data
3
set, the value 4 appears 3 times; the value 1
1

appears 1 time; the value 1 2 appears 2 times;
1

6

5MD2

2

A

7

5MD5b

2

B

8

5G4

2

C

9

5NF6

2

N/A

10

5G2

3

N/A

the value 2 appears 2 times; the value 2 4 appears 2 times; and the value 3 appears 2 times. Each value is represented by the correct number of Xs in the line plot in Choice (A).
Choices (B), (C), and (D) are incorrect because they do not show the correct number of Xs above each number on the number line.
The correct answer is choice (B) 4 cm. The area of the base is (3 cm)(5 cm) = 15 square centimeters. The volume of the microwave is 60
60 cubic centimeters. Since V = Bh, h = = = 15
4 cm. Choice (A) is incorrect because it is the difference between the length and width of the microwave. Choice (C) is incorrect because it is the result of subtracting the area of the base from the volume. Choice (D) is incorrect because it is the result of subtracting the sum of the length and width from the volume.
The correct answer is choice (C) trapezoid.
Choices (A) and (B) are incorrect because the four straws are not the same length. Choice (D) is incorrect because only two of the straws are the same length.
See scoring rubric and exemplar responses on page 63.
See scoring rubric and exemplar responses beginning on page 64.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
Mathematics Example Scoring Rubrics and Exemplar Responses
Item 9

Scoring Rubric
Points

Description
The response achieves the following:
 Response demonstrates a complete understanding of multiplication of fractions as applied to real-world problems.
 Give 2 points for a correct response and a valid process. o Response is correct and complete. o Response shows application of a reasonable and relevant strategy.
 Mathematical ideas are expressed coherently through a clear, complete, logical, and fully developed response using words, calculations, and/or symbols as appropriate.
The response achieves the following:
 Response demonstrates a partial understanding of multiplication of fractions as applied to real-world problems.
 Give 1 point for a correct response but no valid process or a calculation mistake made in an otherwise correct process. o Response is mostly correct, but contains either a computation error or an unclear or incomplete explanation. o Response shows application of a relevant strategy, though it may be only partially applied or remain unexplained.
 Mathematical ideas are expressed only partially using words, calculations, and/or symbols as appropriate.
The response achieves the following:
 The response demonstrates no understanding of multiplication of fractions as applied to real-world problems. o Response shows no application of a strategy. o Mathematical ideas cannot be interpreted or lack sufficient evidence to support even a limited understanding.

2

1

0

Exemplar Response
Points
Awarded

Response

2

5
12

mile; 8 × 3 × 2 = 8 × 3 = 24 = 12 or other valid work

5

1

5

2

10

5

1

5
12

mile

0

Response is irrelevant, inappropriate, or not provided.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
Item 10

Scoring Rubric
Points

4

3

2

Description
The response achieves the following:
 The response demonstrates a complete understanding of representing realworld and mathematical problems by graphing points in the first quadrant of the coordinate plane and interpreting coordinate values of points in the context of the situation.
 Give 4 points for 4 parts answered correctly. o Response is correct and complete. o Response shows application of a reasonable and relevant strategy.
 Mathematical ideas are expressed coherently through a clear, complete, logical, and fully developed response using words, calculations, and/or symbols as appropriate.
The response achieves the following:
 The response demonstrates a good understanding of representing realworld and mathematical problems by graphing points in the first quadrant of the coordinate plane and interpreting coordinate values of points in the context of the situation.
 Give 3 points for 3 parts A and B correctly and part of C correctly OR part A or B correctly and all of C correctly. o Response is mostly correct, but contains either a computation error or an unclear or incomplete explanation. o Response shows application of a relevant strategy, though it may be only partially applied or remain unexplained.
 Mathematical ideas are expressed only partially using words, calculations, and/or symbols as appropriate.
The response achieves the following:
 The response demonstrates a partial understanding of representing realworld and mathematical problems by graphing points in the first quadrant of the coordinate plane and interpreting coordinate values of points in the context of the situation.
 Give 2 points for Part A and Part B correctly OR Part C correctly OR Part A or
B correctly AND Part C partially correct OR any variation. o Response is only partially correct. o Response shows application of a relevant strategy, though it may be only partially applied or remain unexplained.
 Mathematical ideas are expressed only partially using words, calculations, and/or symbols as appropriate.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Mathematics
Item 10

Scoring Rubric – continued
Points

1

0

Description
The response achieves the following:
 The response demonstrates a limited understanding of representing realworld and mathematical problems by graphing points in the first quadrant of the coordinate plane and interpreting coordinate values of points in the context of the situation.
 Give 1 point for 1 part answered correctly. o Response is only partially correct. o Response shows incomplete or inaccurate application of a relevant strategy.  Mathematical ideas are expressed only partially using words, calculations, and/or symbols as appropriate.
The response achieves the following:
 The response demonstrates no understanding of representing real-world and mathematical problems by graphing points in the first quadrant of the coordinate plane and interpreting coordinate values of points in the context of the situation. o Response shows no application of a strategy.
 Mathematical ideas cannot be interpreted or lack sufficient evidence to support even a limited understanding.

Exemplar Response
Points
Awarded

Response
Part A: (1, 2)
Part B: C

4

Part C: On day 1, Addie ran 2 miles. On days 3 and 8, she ran 5 miles. On day 5, she ran 3 miles. On day 10, she ran 6 miles.
OR other valid response
Part A: (1, 2)

3

Part B: C
Part C: Addie ran 6 miles on day 10.
Part A: (1, 2)

2
1
0

Part B: C
Part A: (1, 2)
Response is irrelevant, inappropriate, or not provided.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science

SCIENCE
Description of Test Format and Organization
The Georgia Milestones EOG assessment is primarily a criterion-referenced test, designed to provide information about how well a student has mastered the grade-level state-adopted content standards in
Science. Each student will receive one of four proficiency levels, depending on how well the student has mastered the content standards. In addition to criterion-referenced information, the Georgia Milestones measures will also include a limited sample of nationally norm-referenced items to provide a signal of how Georgia students are achieving relative to their peers nationally. The norm-referenced information provided is supplementary to the criterion-referenced proficiency designation and will not be utilized in any manner other than to serve as a barometer of national comparison. Only the criterion-referenced scores and proficiency designations will be utilized in the accountability metrics associated with the assessment program (such as student growth measures, educator effectiveness measures, or the CCRPI).
The Grade 5 Science EOG assessment consists of a total of 75 selected-response items, 65 of which are operational items (and contribute to a student’s criterion-referenced and/or norm-referenced score) and 10 of which are field test items (newly written items that are being tried out and do not contribute to the student’s score). The criterion-referenced score, and proficiency designation, is comprised of 55 items, for a total of 55 points. Of the 65 operational items, 20 will be norm-referenced and will provide a national comparison in the form of a national percentile rank. Ten of the items have been verified as aligned to the course content standards by Georgia educators and will therefore contribute to the criterion-referenced proficiency designation. The other 10 items will contribute only to the national percentile rank and be provided as supplemental information. Only items that are aligned to the stateadopted content standards will be utilized to inform the criterion-referenced score.
With the inclusion of the norm-referenced items, students may encounter items for which they have not received direct instruction. These items will not contribute to the student’s criterion-referenced proficiency designation; only items that align to the course content standards will contribute to the criterion-referenced score. Students should be instructed to try their best should they ask about an item that is not aligned to the content they have learned as part of the course.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science
Grade 5 Science EOG Assessment Design
Description

Number of
Items

Points for CR1 Score

Points for NRT2
Feedback

CR Selected-Response Items

45

45

0

NRT Selected-Response Items

203

104

20

CR Field Test Items

10

0

0

Total Items/Points5

75

55

20

1CR—Criterion-Referenced:
2NRT—Norm-Referenced

items aligned to state-adopted content standards
Test: items that will yield a national comparison; may or may not be aligned to state-adopted content

standards
3Of these items, 10 will contribute to both the CR scores and NRT feedback. The other 10 of these items will contribute to NRT feedback only and will not impact the student’s proficiency designation, scale score, or grade conversion.
4Alignment of national NRT items to course content standards was verified by a committee of Georgia educators. Only approved, aligned NRT items will contribute to a student’s CR proficiency designation, scale score, and grade conversion score.
5Total number of items contributing to CR score: 55; total points: 55; total number of items contributing to NRT feedback: 20; total points: 20

The test will be given in two sections. Students may have up to 70 minutes per section to complete
Sections 1 and 2. The total estimated testing time for the Grade 5 Science EOG assessment ranges from approximately 100 to 140 minutes. Total testing time describes the amount of time students have to complete the assessment. It does not take into account the time required for the test examiner to complete pre-administration and post-administration activities (such as reading the standardized directions to students). Sections 1 and 2 must be scheduled to be administered on the same day in one test session following the district’s testing protocols for the EOG measures (in keeping with state guidance). Content Measured
The Grade 5 Science assessment will measure the standards that are enumerated for Grade 5 as described on www.georgiastandards.org.
The content of the assessment is organized into three groupings, or domains, of standards for the purposes of providing feedback on student performance. A content domain is a reporting category that broadly describes and defines the content of the course, as measured by the EOG assessment. The standards for Grade 5 Science are grouped into three domains: Earth Science, Physical Science, and Life
Science. Each domain was created by organizing standards that share similar content characteristics. The content standards describe the level of expertise that Grade 5 Science educators should strive to develop in their students. Educators should refer to the content standards for a full understanding of the knowledge, concepts, and skills subject to be assessed on the EOG assessment.
The approximate proportional number of points associated with each domain is shown in the following table. A range of cognitive levels will be represented on the Grade 5 Science EOG assessment. Educators should always use the content standards when planning instruction.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science
Grade 5 Science: Domain Structures and Content Weights
Domain

S5E1
(1a, 1b, 1c)
S5P1
(1a, 1b)
S5P2
(2a, 2b, 2c)
S5P3
(3a, 3b, 3c, 3d)

Earth Science

Physical Science

Life Science

Approximate
Weight

Standard

S5L1
(1a, 1b)
S5L2
(2a, 2b)

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S5L3
(3a, 3b, 3c)
S5L4
(4a, 4b)

30%

30%

40%

Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science
Item Types
The Science portion of the Grade 5 EOG assessment consists of selected-response items only.
A selected-response item, sometimes called a multiple-choice item, is defined as a question, problem, or statement that appears on a test followed by several answer choices, sometimes called options or response choices. The incorrect choices, called distractors, usually reflect common errors. The student’s task is to choose, from the alternatives provided, the best answer to the question posed in the stem (the question). The Science selected-response items will have four answer choices.

Science Example Items
Example items, which are representative of three DOK levels across various Grade 5 Science content domains, are provided on the following pages. All example and sample items contained in this guide are the property of the Georgia Department of Education.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science
Example Item 1
DOK Level: 1
Science Grade 5 Content Domain: Earth Science
Standard: S5E1. Students will identify surface features of the Earth caused by constructive and destructive processes. a. Identify surface features caused by constructive processes.
Which of these landforms is formed by deposition?
A
B
C
D

a mountain near a lake a canyon between two cliffs a delta near the mouth of a river a pool at the bottom of a waterfall

Correct Answer: C
Explanation of Correct Answer: The correct answer is choice (C) a delta near the mouth of a river.
Deposition is the process by which sediments settle over time. As a river flows into a larger water body, the river slows. This allows sediments in the water to sink to the ground. Over time, the sediments build up to form a delta. Choice (A) is incorrect because a mountain is formed by the movement of Earth's tectonic plates. Choice (B) is incorrect because a canyon is typically formed through erosion: as a river flows across the land, its water picks up and carries away sediments. Choice (D) is incorrect because deposition refers to the settling of sediments, not the pooling of water.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science
Example Item 2
DOK Level: 2
Science Grade 5 Content Domain: Earth Science
Standard: S5E1. Students will identify surface features of the Earth caused by constructive and destructive processes. c. Relate the role of technology and human intervention in the control of constructive and destructive processes. Examples include, but are not limited to
 Seismological studies,
 Flood control, (dams, levees, storm drain management, etc.)
 Beach reclamation (Georgia coastal islands)
Scientists can use instruments to predict the likelihood of a volcanic eruption.
Why would scientists MOST LIKELY want to predict the likelihood of a volcanic eruption?
A
B
C
D

to study weather changes to warn people who live nearby to protect nearby houses and buildings to estimate the amount of lava that will flow

Correct Answer: B
Explanation of Correct Answer: The correct answer is choice (B) to warn people who live nearby. When a volcano erupts, it may release molten rock, or lava, and thick clouds of ash. These substances pose great risks to people living nearby. Choices (A) and (D) are incorrect because the timing of an eruption is unrelated to weather in the region or to the amount of lava that will flow from the volcano. Choice (C) is incorrect because there is little that scientists can do to protect buildings from flowing lava.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science
Example Item 3
DOK Level: 2
Science Grade 5 Content Domain: Life Science
Standard: S5L3. Students will diagram and label parts of various cells (plant, animal, single-celled, multicelled). c. Explain how cells in multi-celled organisms are similar and different in structure and function to single-celled organisms.
A scientist uses a microscope to compare tiny multi-celled and single-celled organisms.
Which statement about multi-celled and single-celled organisms is true?
A
B
C
D

Multi-celled organisms can reproduce, but single-celled organisms cannot.
Multi-celled organisms have cell membranes, but single-celled organisms do not.
Multi-celled organisms can move within their environment, but single-celled organisms cannot.
Multi-celled organisms have different cells for different jobs, but single-celled organisms do not.

Correct Answer: D
Explanation of Correct Answer: The correct answer is choice (D) Multi-celled organisms have different cells for different jobs, but single-celled organisms do not. A single-celled organism consists of only one cell that can perform all the necessary life functions. In contrast, multi-celled organisms have cells that have adapted to perform specific functions. Choices (A) and (C) are incorrect because both single-celled and multi-celled organisms can reproduce and move within their environments. Choice (B) is incorrect because all cells have cell membranes.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science
Example Item 4
DOK Level: 3
Science Grade 5 Content Domain: Physical Science
Standard: S5P2. Students will explain the difference between a physical change and a chemical change.
c. Investigate the properties of a substance before, during, and after a chemical reaction to find evidence of change.
A group of students is performing an experiment in science class. The students drop an antacid tablet into a glass of water. The antacid tablet begins to dissolve and bubbles start to form.
Which would MOST LIKELY explain why bubbles are formed?
A
B
C
D

The antacid tablet is chemically changing because gas is being released.
The antacid tablet is chemically changing because a solid is changing shape.
The antacid tablet is physically changing because the water becomes cloudy.
The antacid tablet is physically changing because the water is getting very warm.

Correct Answer: A
Explanation of Correct Answer: The correct answer is choice (A) The antacid tablet is chemically changing because gas is being released. The antacid tablet consists of certain chemicals that react with the chemicals in the water. As a result of this reaction, new substances form; some of these new substances take the form of gas that bubbles out of solution. Choice (B) is incorrect because a change of shape is an example of a physical change, not a chemical change. Choices (C) and (D) are incorrect because the release of gas bubbles is a sign of a chemical change. In addition, the change in shape of the antacid table is not caused by the water becoming cloudy or getting very warm.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science
Example Item 5
DOK Level: 3
Science Grade 5 Content Domain: Physical Science
Standard: S5P3. Students will investigate the electricity, magnetism, and their relationship. d. Compare a bar magnet to an electromagnet.
A scientist is going to conduct research in the forest. She will bring a magnet as one of her research supplies. Which magnet would be BEST for the scientist to bring on her trip to the forest and why?
A
B
C
D

a bar magnet because it has two different poles an electromagnet because its strength is constant a bar magnet because it does not need a power source an electromagnet because it can attract more materials

Correct Answer: C
Explanation of Correct Answer: The correct answer is choice (C) a bar magnet because it does not need a power source. In the forest, the scientist may not have access to a source of electricity, but she can use a bar magnet regardless. Choice (A) is incorrect because all magnets have two different poles. Choice (B) is incorrect because an electromagnet's strength depends on the current that flows through it. Choice
(D) is incorrect because an electromagnet may be stronger than a bar magnet, but it does not attract more materials.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science
Science Additional Sample Items
This section has two parts. The first part is a set of 10 sample items for the Science portion of the EOG assessment. The second part contains a table that shows for each item the standard assessed, the DOK level, the correct answer (key), and a rationale/explanation about the key and distractors. The sample items can be utilized as a mini-test to familiarize students with the item formats found on the assessment. All example and sample items contained in this guide are the property of the Georgia
Department of Education.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science
Item 1
A student grouped his classmates based on certain characteristics. The table shows the characteristic used to describe each group.

Student Characteristics
Group
1
2
3
4

Characteristic
Tall height
Brown eyes
Ride bicycles
Like spaghetti

Which two groups are described by an inherited characteristic?
A
B
C
D

Group 1 and Group 2
Group 1 and Group 4
Group 2 and Group 3
Group 3 and Group 4

Item 2
Microorganisms were discovered after the microscope was invented in the 1600s. Since then scientists have found ways that microorganisms can be harmful.
Which of these describes one way that some microorganisms are harmful?
A
B
C
D

They are used to make certain types of food.
They are used to make certain fuels for energy.
They cause diseases that can be spread to others.
They break down waste matter in the environment.

Item 3
A student walks on a carpet while wearing a pair of rubber shoes. He touches a metal doorknob and feels a small shock.
Which of these BEST explains what causes the student to experience the shock?
A
B
C
D

the flow of energy due to gravity acting on the pair of shoes the flow of charges due friction between the carpet and the pair of shoes the flow of charges due to friction between the student's fingers and the doorknob the flow of heat due to a difference in temperature between the student's fingers and the doorknob

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science
Item 4
A group of students investigated physical and chemical changes using paper. The students recorded their observations in a table.
Student
1
2
3
4

Folding
Physical
Chemical
Physical
Physical

Burning
Chemical
Physical
Physical
Chemical

Cutting
Chemical
Chemical
Physical
Physical

Tearing
Physical
Chemical
Chemical
Physical

Which student correctly recorded all the changes that took place?
A
B
C
D

Student 1
Student 2
Student 3
Student 4

Item 5
The table shows data collected by a scientist about two geologic processes.

Geologic Processes
Process
1
2

Rate of Increase in Thickness of Earth’s Surface
Fast
Slow

Amount of Heat Produced
A lot
Very little

Which processes are MOST LIKELY described in the table?
A
B
C
D

Process 1 is a volcanic eruption, and Process 2 is deposition.
Process 1 is deposition, and Process 2 is a volcanic eruption.
Process 1 is a volcanic eruption, and Process 2 is an earthquake.
Process 1 is an earthquake, and Process 2 is a volcanic eruption.

Item 6
A student reads that electromagnets are used in devices such as car motors and toasters.
Which of these BEST describes why electromagnets are used in these devices instead of bar magnets?
A
B
C
D

Electromagnets are permanent magnets.
Electromagnets can be turned on and off.
Electromagnets last longer than bar magnets.
Electromagnets are usually smaller than bar magnets.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science
Item 7
A dam constructed on a river can store large amounts of water behind it.
Which of these describes another reason for building a dam?
A
B
C
D

Dams help prevent forest fires.
Dams help prevent floods near rivers.
Dams help prevent erosion along riverbanks.
Dams help prevent pollution from getting into rivers.

Item 8
A student went to a river in the mountains and observed that some rocks were smooth and round, while others were rough and jagged. She noticed that the rocks were all made from the same type of mineral. Which of these BEST explains the student's observations?
A
B
C
D

The rough, jagged rocks are from a volcanic eruption far away.
The rough, jagged rocks were blown into the water by wind erosion.
The smooth, round rocks are much newer than the rough, jagged rocks.
The smooth, round rocks have been weathered longer than the rough, jagged rocks.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science
Item 9
Four students examined the cells shown.

Each student made an observation about one of the cells.
Student 1: Cell 1 is a plant cell because it has a cell wall.
Student 2: Cell 2 is an animal cell because it has a nucleus.
Student 3: Cell 1 is a plant cell because it has chloroplasts.
Student 4: Cell 2 is an animal cell because it has a cell membrane.
Which students are correct?
A
B
C
D

Student 1 and Student 2
Student 2 and Student 3
Student 1 and Student 3
Student 2 and Student 4

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science
Item 10
A teacher takes his class on a field trip to a park to study plants and sort them into groups. The students create a table that contains their observations about each plant. One plant, labeled X, is unknown. Plant
1
2
3
4
X

Amount of Light for Best Growth
Sunny
Sunny
Sunny
Shady
Shady

Method of
Reproduction
Spores
Seeds
Seeds
Seeds
Spores

Height (in centimeters) 61
914
4
46
3

Soil Conditions
Damp
Wet
Dry
Damp
Wet

Based on the information in the table, which plant is MOST LIKELY related to Plant X?
A
B
C
D

Plant 1 because both plants makes spores
Plant 2 because both plants grow in wet soil
Plant 3 because both plants are short
Plant 4 because both plants grow in the shade

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science
Science Additional Sample Item Keys
Item

Standard/
Element

Characteristics of Science

DOK
Level

Correct
Answer

1

S5L2a

S5CS8a

2

A

2

S5L4b

S5CS7b

2

C

3

S5P3a

S5CS1c

2

B

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Explanation
The correct answer is choice (A) Group 1 and
Group 2. A person's height and eye color are determined by genes that the person inherits from his or her parents. Choices (B) and (D) are incorrect because genes do not determine whether a person likes spaghetti (Group 4).
Choice (C) is incorrect because genes do not determine whether a person rides bicycles
(Group 3).
The correct answer is choice (C) They cause diseases that can be spread to others.
Microorganisms that cause contagious diseases include the bacteria that cause pneumonia, the fungi that cause athlete's foot, and the protozoa that cause malaria; many people also consider viruses microorganisms. Choices (A),
(B), and (D) are incorrect because these statements describe ways that microorganisms can help people.
The correct answer is choice (B) the flow of charges due to friction between the carpet and the pair of shoes. As the person walks across the carpet, the resulting friction causes charges to build up as static electricity. When the person touches the metal doorknob, the charges are released, causing a shock and possibly a spark. Choice (A) is incorrect because gravity is an attractive force between objects with mass; it does not cause electric charges to build up in an object. Choice (C) is incorrect between friction is the force that causes electric charges to build up as the person walks across the carpet; contact with the metal doorknob releases those charges. Choice (D) is incorrect because heat is generated by vibrating particles; these vibrations do not cause electric charges to build up in an object.

Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science

Item

Standard/
Element

Characteristics of Science

DOK
Level

Correct
Answer

4

S5P2a

S5CS8a

2

D

5

S5E1a

S5CS4a

3

A

6

S5P3d

S5CS1c

2

B

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Explanation
The correct answer is choice (D) Student 4.
Folding, cutting, and tearing are physical changes; they do not involve chemical reactions that produce new substances. Burning is a chemical change; the chemical composition of the paper changes as it burns. Choice (A) is incorrect because cutting is a physical change.
Choice (B) is incorrect because Student 2 has misidentified each change. Choice (C) is incorrect because burning is a chemical change and tearing is a physical change.
The correct answer is choice (A) Process 1 is a volcanic eruption, and Process 2 is deposition.
During a volcanic eruption, molten rock flows from beneath Earth's surface to Earth's surface, rapidly increasing the thickness of the surface while producing lots of heat. During deposition, sediments settle to Earth's surface, slowly increasing the thickness of the surface while producing very little heat. Choice (B) is incorrect because Processes 1 and 2 have been reversed. Choices (C) and (D) are incorrect because earthquakes do not modify the thickness of the Earth’s surface.
The correct answer is choice (B) Electromagnets can be turned on and off. Running electricity through an electromagnet creates an attractive force that helps the device to perform work.
When the work has been performed and the attractive force is no longer needed, the electricity can be turned off. Choice (A) is incorrect because electromagnets are temporary magnets. Choice (C) is incorrect because electromagnets do not necessarily last longer than bar magnets. Choice (D) is incorrect because electromagnets and bar magnets each come in many different sizes.

Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Science

Item

Standard/
Element

Characteristics of Science

DOK
Level

Correct
Answer

7

S5E1c

S5CS4a

2

B

8

S5E1b

S5CS8a

2

D

9

S5L3b

S5CS4b

2

C

10

S5L1b

S5CS8a

2

A

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Explanation
The correct answer is choice (B) Dams help prevent floods near rivers. The dam interrupts and allows people to control the flow of a river.
Choice (A) is incorrect because dams have nothing to do with forest fires. Choice (C) is incorrect because a dam can increase erosion downstream of the dam by depriving riverbanks of new sediments. Choice (D) is incorrect because dams can cause or exacerbate water pollution by changing the temperature, composition, and quality of the water upstream and downstream of the dam.
The correct answer is choice (D) The smooth, round rocks have been weathered longer than the rough, jagged rocks. Over time, weathering agents such as wind and moving water wear away jagged or protruding edges from rocks.
The longer a rock is exposed to these agents, the smoother and rounder it becomes. Choice
(A) is incorrect because volcanic eruptions are more likely to spew ash than rocks great distances. Choice (B) is incorrect because wind is no more likely to blow jagged rocks than smooth rocks. Choice (C) is incorrect because the opposite is likely true: the smooth, round rocks are older and thus have been weathered longer. The correct answer is choice (C) Student 1 and
Student 3. Plant cells have cell walls and chloroplasts, but animal cells do not. Choices
(A), (B), and (D) are incorrect because both plant cells and animal cells have nuclei and cell membranes. The correct answer is choice (A) Plant 1 because both plants make spores. Choice (B) is incorrect because soil conditions are not used to assign plants into groups. Choice (C) is incorrect because plant height is different at different times in the life cycle. Choice (D) is incorrect because amount of light needed is less important than method of reproduction in assigning plants into groups.

Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Social Studies

SOCIAL STUDIES
Description of Test Format and Organization
The Georgia Milestones EOG assessment is primarily a criterion-referenced test, designed to provide information about how well a student has mastered the grade-level state-adopted content standards in
Social Studies. Each student will receive one of four proficiency levels, depending on how well the student has mastered the content standards. In addition to criterion-referenced information, the
Georgia Milestones measures will also include a limited sample of nationally norm-referenced items to provide a signal of how Georgia students are achieving relative to their peers nationally. The normreferenced information provided is supplementary to the criterion-referenced proficiency designation and will not be utilized in any manner other than to serve as a barometer of national comparison. Only the criterion-referenced scores and proficiency designations will be utilized in the accountability metrics associated with the assessment program (such as student growth measures, educator effectiveness measures, or the CCRPI).
The Grade 5 Social Studies EOG assessment consists of a total of 75 selected-response items, 65 of which are operational items (and contribute to a student’s criterion-referenced and/or norm-referenced score) and 10 of which are field test items (newly written items that are being tried out and do not contribute to the student’s score). The criterion-referenced score, and proficiency designation, is comprised of 55 items, for a total of 55 points. Of the 65 operational items, 20 will be norm-referenced and will provide a national comparison in the form of a national percentile rank. Ten of the items have been verified as aligned to the course content standards by Georgia educators and will therefore contribute to the criterion-referenced proficiency designation. The other 10 items will contribute only to the national percentile rank and be provided as supplemental information. Only items that are aligned to the state-adopted content standards will be utilized to inform the criterion-referenced score.
With the inclusion of the norm-referenced items, students may encounter items for which they have not received direct instruction. These items will not contribute to the student’s criterion-referenced proficiency designation; only items that align to the course content standards will contribute to the criterion-referenced score. Students should be instructed to try their best should they ask about an item that is not aligned to the content they have learned as part of the course.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Social Studies
Grade 5 Social Studies EOG Assessment Design
Description

Number of
Items

Points for CR1 Score

Points for NRT2
Feedback

CR Selected-Response Items

45

45

0

NRT Selected-Response Items

203

104

20

CR Field Test Items

10

0

0

Total Items/Points5

75

55

20

1CR—Criterion-Referenced:
2NRT—Norm-Referenced

items aligned to state-adopted content standards
Test: items that will yield a national comparison; may or may not be aligned to state-adopted content

standards
3Of these items, 10 will contribute to both the CR scores and NRT feedback. The other 10 of these items will contribute to NRT feedback only and will not impact the student’s proficiency designation, scale score, or grade conversion.
4Alignment of national NRT items to course content standards was verified by a committee of Georgia educators. Only approved, aligned NRT items will contribute to a student’s CR proficiency designation, scale score, and grade conversion score.
5Total number of items contributing to CR score: 55; total points: 55; total number of items contributing to NRT feedback: 20; total points: 20

The test will be given in two sections. Students may have up to 70 minutes per section to complete
Sections 1 and 2. The total estimated testing time for the Grade 5 Social Studies EOG assessment ranges from approximately 100 to 140 minutes. Total testing time describes the amount of time students have to complete the assessment. It does not take into account the time required for the test examiner to complete pre-administration and post-administration activities (such as reading the standardized directions to students). Sections 1 and 2 must be scheduled to be administered on the same day in one test session following the district’s testing protocols for the EOG measures (in keeping with state guidance). Content Measured
The Grade 5 Social Studies assessment will measure the standards that are enumerated for Grade 5 as described on www.georgiastandards.org.
The content of the assessment is organized into four groupings, or domains, of standards for the purposes of providing feedback on student performance. A content domain is a reporting category that broadly describes and defines the content of the course, as measured by the EOG assessment. The standards for Grade 5 Social Studies are grouped into four domains: History, Geography, Government and Civics, and Economics. Each domain was created by organizing standards that share similar content characteristics. The content standards describe the level of expertise that Grade 5 Social Studies educators should strive to develop in their students. Educators should refer to the content standards for a full understanding of the knowledge, concepts, and skills subject to be assessed on the EOG assessment. The approximate proportional number of points associated with each domain is shown in the following table. A range of cognitive levels will be represented on the Grade 5 Social Studies EOG assessment.
Educators should always use the content standards when planning instruction.
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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Social Studies
Grade 5 Social Studies: Domain Structures and Content Weights
Domain

History

Geography

Government and Civics

Economics

Standard
SS5H1
SS5H6
(1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e)
(6a, 6b, 6c, 6d, 6e,
SS5H2
6f)
(2a,2 b,2c)
SS5H7
SS5H3
(7a, 7b, 7c)
(3a, 3b, 3c, 3d, 3e)
SS5H8
SS5H4
(8a, 8b, 8c, 8d)
(4a, 4b)
SS5H9
SS5H5
(9a, 9b)
(5a, 5b, 5c)
SS5G1
(1a, 1b)
SS5G2
(2a, 2b)
SS5CG1
(1a, 1b, 1c)
SS5CG3
SS5CG2
(3a, 3b)
(2a, 2b)
SS5E1
SS5E3
(1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 1f)
(3a, 3b, 3c)
SS5E2
SS5E4
(2a, 2b, 2c, 2d)

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Approximate
Weight

50%

15%

20%

15%

Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Social Studies
Item Types
The Social Studies portion of the Grade 5 EOG assessment consists of selected-response items only.
A selected-response item, sometimes called a multiple-choice item, is defined as a question, problem, or statement that appears on a test followed by several answer choices, sometimes called options or response choices. The incorrect choices, called distractors, usually reflect common errors. The student’s task is to choose, from the alternatives provided, the best answer to the question posed in the stem (the question). The Social Studies selected-response items will have four answer choices.

Social Studies Example Items
Example items, which are representative of three DOK levels across various Grade 5 Social Studies content domains, are provided on the following pages. All example and sample items contained in this guide are the property of the Georgia Department of Education.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Social Studies
Example Item 1
DOK Level: 1
Social Studies Grade 5 Content Domain: History
Standard: SS5H4. The student will describe U.S. involvement in World War I and post-World War I
America. b. Describe the cultural developments and individual contributions in the 1920s of the Jazz Age
(Louis Armstrong), the Harlem Renaissance (Langston Hughes), baseball (Babe Ruth), the automobile
(Henry Ford), and the airplane (Charles Lindbergh).
What was Babe Ruth known for in the 1920s?
A
B
C
D

being a World War I hero being a popular jazz musician being a famous baseball player being an African American poet

Correct Answer: C
Explanation of Correct Answer: The correct answer is choice (C) being a famous baseball player. Babe
Ruth was a popular outfielder for the New York Yankees in the 1920s. Choices (A), (B), and (D) are incorrect because Ruth was not a war hero, a jazz musician, or an African American poet.

Example Item 2
DOK Level: 2
Social Studies Grade 5 Content Domain: History
Standard: SS5H4. The student will describe U.S. involvement in World War I and post-World War I
America. a. Explain how German attacks on U.S. shipping during the war in Europe (1914-1917) ultimately led the U.S. to join the fight against Germany; include the sinking of the Lusitania and concerns over safety of U.S. ships, U.S. contributions to the war, and the impact of the Treaty of
Versailles in 1919.
Which of these events caused the United States to join the fight against Germany in World War I?
A
B
C
D

the sinking of the Lusitania the attack on the Eastern Front the signing of the Treaty of Versailles the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

Correct Answer: A

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Social Studies
Explanation of Correct Answer: The correct answer is choice (A) the sinking of the Lusitania. The British ocean liner Lusitania was attacked and sunk by German forces on May 7, 1915, killing more than 1,000 people, including more than 100 Americans. The attack sparked a public outcry in the United States and eventually led to U.S. entry into World War I. Choice (B) is incorrect because, although this event took place during World War I, it did not cause the United States to join the fight. Choice (C) is incorrect because the Treaty of Versailles was a peace treaty that helped end the war. Choice (D) is incorrect because, although this event was the catalyst for World War I, it did not cause the United States to join the fight.

Example Item 3
DOK Level: 2
Social Studies Grade 5 Content Domain: Government/Civics
Standard: SS5CG1. The student will explain how a citizen’s rights are protected under the U.S.
Constitution. a. Explain the responsibilities of a citizen.
Which action describes a responsibility of being a United States citizen?
A
B
C
D

running for elected office expressing an opinion freely serving as a member of a jury attending weekly religious services

Correct Answer: C
Explanation of Correct Answer: The correct answer is choice (C) serving as a member of a jury. Serving on a jury is a responsibility of all eligible U.S. citizens. Choices (A), (B), and (D) are incorrect because these are rights that U.S. citizens may choose to exercise but are not required to do so.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Social Studies
Example Item 4
DOK Level: 3
Social Studies Grade 5 Content Domain: Geography
Standard: SS5G2. The student will explain the reasons for the spatial patterns of economic activities. b.
Locate primary agricultural and industrial locations since the turn of the 20th century and explain how factors such as population, transportation, and resources have influenced these areas.
Look at the bar graph.

Which is a reason the population in these three cities changed between 1870 and 1920?
A
B
C
D

Free farmland was provided to settlers.
Many men went overseas to fight in wars.
New industries provided jobs for people.
Fewer immigrants moved to these areas.

Correct Answer: C
Explanation of Correct Answer: The correct answer is choice (C) New industries provided jobs for people. The growth of new industries in the United States caused many people to move into cities to work at factories. Choice (A) is incorrect because people moved into urban areas rather than rural areas.
Choice (B) is incorrect because soldiers going overseas would not cause a growth in city populations.
Choice (D) is incorrect because more immigrants moved to cities.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Social Studies
Example Item 5
DOK Level: 3
Social Studies Grade 5 Content Domain: Economics
Standard: SS5E1. The student will use the basic economic concepts of trade, opportunity cost, specialization, voluntary exchange, productivity, and price incentives to illustrate historical events. a.
Describe opportunity costs and their relationship to decision-making across time (such as decisions to ration goods during WWII).
Read the information in the box.

Examples of Items Rationed in the United States during World War II
Eggs—One per day allowed
Shoes—One pair per year allowed
Meat—Six ounces per day allowed
Cheese—Four ounces per day allowed
Gasoline—Four gallons per week allowed
Which of these describes an opportunity cost of the United States government's decision to ration items during World War II?
A
B
C
D

There were fewer goods available for the public to buy.
There was a shortage of supplies available to the military.
It became less expensive for the public to buy most products.
Companies that produced rationed goods went out of business.

Correct Answer: A
Explanation of Correct Answer: The correct answer is choice (A) There were fewer goods available for the public to buy. An opportunity cost is the cost or risk of making a certain economic decision. By setting aside items to ration to the public, the government made fewer of those items available to sell to consumers. Choices (B), (C), and (D) are incorrect because they do not describe effects of the government's decision to ration items.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Social Studies
Social Studies Additional Sample Items
This section has two parts. The first part is a set of 10 sample items for the Social Studies portion of the
EOG assessment. The second part contains a table that shows for each item the standard assessed, the
DOK level, the correct answer (key), and a rationale/explanation about the key and distractors. The sample items can be utilized as a mini-test to familiarize students with the item formats found on the assessment. All example and sample items contained in this guide are the property of the Georgia
Department of Education.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Social Studies
Item 1
Read the information in the box.




automobile computers Internet

What was an effect of these technological advancements?
A
B
C
D

The quality of goods decreased.
There was an increase in business productivity.
There was an increase in the cost of products.
The number of people who could afford goods decreased.

Item 2
Which of these is guaranteed by the Bill of Rights?
A
B
C
D

the right to vote the right to own land the right to travel between states the right to petition the government

Item 3
Which of these was an accomplishment of the Tennessee Valley Authority?
A
B
C
D

It improved tourism by building hotels.
It brought electricity to thousands of people.
It taught workers how to organize unions.
It provided a police force for large urban areas.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Social Studies
Item 4
Look at the map.

Which body of water is shown by the arrow on the map?
A
B
C
D

the Great Salt Lake the Gulf of Mexico the Mississippi River the Salton Sea

Item 5
Which of these was an effect of the Voting Rights Act?
A
B
C
D

It changed the way senators are elected.
It lowered the age at which people can vote.
It provided protections for people registering to vote.
It changed the way the president and vice president are elected.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Social Studies
Item 6
In 1946, Winston Churchill used the term “Iron Curtain” when describing conditions in Europe. What did he mean by this term?
A
B
C
D

European nations needed to build more factories.
Peace had finally spread throughout the countries of Europe.
The militaries of Western Europe were becoming too powerful.
There was a division between communist Eastern Europe and Western Europe.

Item 7
Look at the chart.

Which of these completes the empty box in the chart?
A
B
C
D

by the president by the Supreme Court by three-fourths of the state legislatures by three-fourths of the members of both the House and the Senate

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Social Studies
Item 8
Read the information in the box.





signed at the end of World War I required Germany to pay Allies for damages caused by the war required Germany to reduce the size of its military

Which of these is described in the box?
A
B
C
D

the New Deal the United Nations the Treaty of Versailles the North Atlantic Treaty Organization

Item 9
Read the information in the box.
"Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"
—Excerpt from a poem at the base of the Statue of Liberty
Written by Emma Lazarus, 1883
Based on the excerpt, what did America MOST LIKELY represent to most immigrants during the early
1900s?
A
B
C
D

a chance to become famous a way to have personal freedom a means to receive better housing an opportunity for government leadership

Item 10
Which of these BEST describes the function of private business?
A
B
C
D

to maintain the security of citizens to provide services through taxation to produce goods and services for the public to provide savings and investment opportunities to the public

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Social Studies
Social Studies Additional Sample Item Keys
Item

Standard/
Element

DOK Level

Correct
Answer

1

SS5E1f

2

B

2

SS5CG1b

1

D

3

SS5H5b

2

B

4

SS5G1a

1

A

5

SS5H8b

2

C

Explanation
The correct answer is choice (B) There was an increase in business productivity. Technological advancements such as computers and the
Internet allowed workers and businesses to work much more quickly and effectively.
Choices (A), (C), and (D) are incorrect because the technological advancements had the opposite effect of those stated.
The correct answer is choice (D) the right to petition the government. The First Amendment to the U.S. the Constitution establishes the right to petition the government. Choices (A),
(B), and (C) are incorrect because the Bill of
Rights does not specifically establish these rights. The correct answer is choice (B) It brought electricity to thousands of people. The
Tennessee Valley Authority was created in 1933 by the U.S. government to help produce electrical power along the Tennessee River.
Choices (A), (C), and (D) are incorrect because the TVA did not build hotels, organize unions, or provide a police force.
The correct answer is choice (A) the Great Salt
Lake. The Great Salt Lake, the largest salt-water lake in the Western Hemisphere, is located in
Utah. Choices (B) and (C) are incorrect because these bodies of water are located further east.
Choice (D) is incorrect because the Salton Sea is located in California.
The correct answer is choice (C) It provided protections for people registering to vote. The
Voting Rights Act of 1965 was mainly designed to prevent discrimination against African
American voters and to protect their voting rights under the Fifteenth Amendment. Choices
(A) and (D) are incorrect because the Voting
Rights Act does not address how certain officials are elected. Choice (B) is incorrect because the 26th Amendment, not the Voting
Rights Act, lowered the voting age to 18.

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Georgia Milestones Grade 5 EOG Assessment Guide | Social Studies

Item

Standard/
Element

DOK Level

Correct
Answer

6

SS5H7a

2

D

7

SS5CG2a

3

C

8

SS5H4a

2

C

9

SS5H3d

3

B

10

SS5E2b

2

C

Explanation
The correct answer is choice (D) There was a division between communist Eastern Europe and Western Europe. The term "Iron Curtain" was meant to emphasize the political barrier between Eastern and Western Europe. Choice
(A) is incorrect because the term does not refer to factories or industry. Choice (B) is incorrect because the countries of Europe were in conflict. Choice (C) is incorrect because the term does not refer to militaries.
The correct answer is choice (C) by threefourths of the state legislatures. A constitutional amendment can be ratified either by state ratifying conventions in threefourths of the states or by three-fourths of the state legislatures. Choices (A), (B), and (D) are incorrect because these are not ways to ratify constitutional amendments.
The correct answer is choice (C) the Treaty of
Versailles. The Treaty of Versailles was a peace treaty signed at the end of World War I that required Germany to reduce the size of its military and to pay the Allied Powers for damages caused by the war. Choices (A), (B), and (D) are incorrect because the phrases in the list do not describe the New Deal, the
United Nations, or the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization.
The correct answer is choice (B) a way to have personal freedom. The poem suggests that the
United States is willing to take in immigrants who are sick, poor, or disadvantaged and offer them an opportunity for a better life. Choices
(A), (C), and (D) are incorrect because the poem does not refer specifically to fame, housing, or government leadership roles.
The correct answer is choice (C) to produce goods and services for the public. Private businesses produce goods and services for public consumers to buy. Choices (A) and (D) are incorrect because they do not describe functions or responsibilities of private businesses. Choice (B) is incorrect because it describes a function of the government.

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