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'the Uk Constitution Is No Longer Fit for Purpose, Dicuss

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‘The UK constitution is no longer fit for purpose.’ Discuss

The UK constitution gives too much power to the executive because of the fusion of powers which makes a parliamentary government; government is in control of parliament. The government of the day can simply pass, repeal or amend any laws; the proposals can also be constitutional changes. This could lead to the possibility of an elective dictatorship to take place, the government that has the majority and comes into power can make constitutional changes and pass any laws with the assistance of the party whip system it possible to make all MPs from the majority party to vote a certain way for example john major had expelled 8 anti-euro sceptic MPs to keep the conservative government united and to pass the laws. Although it can be argued that party whip system makes a decisive government, the MPs who are disciplined are forced to represent the party instead of their constituents. If there was to be a separation of powers it would ensure checks and balances and not give excessive power to government. Also a codified constitution will not allow the government of the day to easily repeal the current constitutional laws that are in place. The royal prerogative powers which was handed to the prime minister by the monarch is fundamentally undemocratic, it allows the government to declare war against anyone even if the public view differs. The public didn’t get to decide if the prime minister should have this power. It was simply handed over by the monarch.
Another reason why the UK constitution is no longer fit for purpose is because the rules are unclear and changes can lack legitimacy. The constitution comes from various sources, this and the fact that it’s uncodified makes it unclear for example with parliament there was no clear rule about what should happen if there was to be a coalition government, it was…...

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