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The Duty of Loyalty: Whistleblowing

In: Business and Management

Submitted By Jlein
Words 646
Pages 3
Multiple Choice Questions (3pts each)
1. Select the best definition of whistleblower:
a. the sole goal of modern ethics training
b. originated from the Latin "qui tam pro domino rege quam pro sic ipso in hoc parte sequitur" meaning "who as well for the king as for himself sues in this matter."
c. a narrow exception under the general rule of at-will employment
d. people who report unethical or illegal activities under the control of their employers
ANSWER: D

2. Under the legal doctrine of “employment at will” an employee can be lawfully terminated from her job for:
I. wearing a shirt that clashes with her suit
II. any non-discriminatory reason
III. complaining about illegal activity in the workplace
IV. only for good cause
a. a. I only
b. b. II only
c. c. I and II
d. d. III and IV
ANSWER: C 3. Exceptions to the rule of employment-at-will include which of the following?
I. organization of unions
II. passage of Sarbanes Oxley Act
III. raising of public policy issues
IV. promise of implied-contract or covenant-of-good-faith
a. I only
b. II only
c. I and II
d. I, II, III, IV
ANSWER: D

4. In the essay, Work Matters, by law professor Marion Crain, all of the following are the result of working except:
a. People become self-sufficient.
b. People become more engaged in the democratic process.
c. People become more engaged in society and social issues.
d. People stay out of jail.
ANSWER: D
5. The Sarbanes Oxley Act was passed in response to:
I. concerns that investors received full and complete information about potential corporate fraud
II. a lack of investor confidence
III. corporate scandals beginning with Enron
IV. discrimination against an employee when providing information she reasonably believes constitutes a violation of federal security laws
a. I only
b. II only
c. I and II
d. I, II, III, IV
ANSWER: C
6.…...

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