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Revolution's Effect on Women in Persepolis

In: English and Literature

Submitted By brbaral
Words 640
Pages 3
Bishant Baral
Professor Dunnigan
May 7, 2014
Persepolis: Final Exam From the beginning of Persepolis, one can come to the conclusion that Marjane has a very bright future ahead of her. Her curious and patriotic demeanor as a child matures and allows her to become a strong-minded woman during a time of great female oppression in Iran. For Marjane, the ideas of nationalism and patriotism had been a major part of her upbringing. The novel begins with ten year old Marjane in 1980. Although not a teenager yet, Marjane is forced to conform to the oppression and the various laws that specifically target women. Marjane's mother was a very opinionated individual who believed in equal rights. Her rebellious nature becomes an influence to Marjane as she begins to grow older and mature. Taji, Marjane's mother, is a passionate woman who is extremely disappointed with the things in Iran. She actively protests with others who are not happy with the elimination of women's rights and violent attacks on innocent people It began with schools becoming segregated by sex. The French school that Marjane once attended was no longer allowed in Iran. The revolution had begun to ban all sorts of western and European influences. For example, women were obliged to wear veils in public now. If a female was to be caught by the authorities without a veil on, they would be verbally abused and possibly even severely chastised. Moreover, a man and a woman were not allowed to be seen in public unless they could prove they were married. This concept was one that many girls of Satrapi's generation actually seemed to are about. For instance, after the segregation of schools in Tehran, the government required that all the teachings were prohibited from conveying any western philosophies or messages to the students. As educated parents, Mr. and Mrs. Satrapi sent Marjane to a French school in…...

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