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Philosophical Fields

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Philosophical Fields
Philosophy is a wide-ranging discipline because it deals with various dimensions of human experience. In order to have a better, complete and deeper understanding of philosophy which is broad in nature we should analyze first its components, parts and fields. We study these parts separately, show there interrelationship as well as their relation as a whole.
The two philosophical categories are theoretical and practical philosophy. Theoretical philosophy deals with the acquisition of truth and knowledge while practical aims not only to learn the truth but as well as the application of truth or knowledge to benefit and be useful to mankind.
Philosophical fields are classified under theoretical philosophy; epistemology-knowledge, cosmology-physical universe, metaphysics-reality, being and existence, ontology- particular existing things, psychology-mind and consciousness, theodicy- God and Divine doctrine. Therefore theoretical deals with knowing things, aiming knowledge or truth and reflects about nature as well as the relation of things.
Under practical philosophy include; semantics- linguistic meanings, logic- thinking and argument, ethics-behavior and good life, aesthetics- art and beauty and the last is axiology-values. This kind of philosophy, concern to the things which perceptible and useful. Its goal is not just finding the truth but applying the knowledge gained for the benefit of the mankind.
As life in this world becomes more complicated, it is very useful to study philosophy especially its fields which were mentioned above. Studying these fields will sum up to a great solutions to the problem of human today- the threat of nuclear war, hunger, rebellion etc.
A great illustration would be by using an example. Under the so called practical philosophy, which concern to its application, ethics would be very useful since it study about behavior and good life, humans would think anything that ends to their major concern which is attaining a wealthy life not only in terms of money but also in all other aspects. And so, mankind would not to think about war that would vanish the life of man, instead they would think for a better things.
As students, we view this lessons as our foundation in studying philosophy in a sense that it will unleash our consciousness and we will be able to deeply understand this subject.…...

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