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Opiates

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By esubervi1
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Opiates | November 292012 | | |

The Drug & It’s Effects Opiates are powerful drugs derived from the poppy plant that have been used for centuries to relieve pain. Also known as narcotics, opiates can be natural or synthetic. The natural opiates include opium, morphine, and codeine. Other substances, called opioids, are man-made. These substances are like opiates in that they are most often used to treat chronic or severe pain and are also highly addictive. These substances include Dilaudid, Demerol, Oxycodone, Vicodin, Fentanyl, Methadone, and Darvon. Heroin is an opioid manufactured from morphine. Heroin has no medicinal uses; it is used for its ability to give the user a feeling of euphoria.
The effects of opiate use can vary depending on the method of use. The user may have a flushed appearance and complain of dry mouth. The user may also notice periods of "nodding off" or going back and forth between feelings drowsy and alert. They may also complain about his/her limbs feeling extremely heavy. These effects will most likely disappear within a few hours, as the opiate wears off. Excessive use of opiates can cause a slowdown in activity of the respiratory center in the brain stem, which results in decreased breathing rate or shut down breathing altogether. When someone overdoses on an opiate, it is the action of the opiate on the brain stem's respiratory centers that can cause the person to stop breathing and die. Over time, opiate users may develop infections of the heart lining and valves, skin abscesses, and congested lungs. Infections from unsterilized paraphernalia can cause illness such as liver disease, tetanus (lockjaw), and serum hepatitis.
The reaction a user experiences from the opiate is also directly related to several factors including length of time, quantity of use, method of use, and the source of the opiate. If a user gets their…...

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