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Music Therapy and the Human Brain

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ASSESSMENT – A Culture of Inquiry
Please work with your department faculty to develop a graduate profile that reflects common goals among all departments and in relationship to our mission statement. This graduate profile should be ready prior to our next Program Chairs meeting on October 7th, when we will discuss and come to agreement about what we believe is our “ultimate” graduate profile. Following program chairs’ agreement, the material will go to the full faculty for discussion and vote. I will also gather input from Student Affairs so that we understand their contribution to the success of our students.

Readings about assessment and what it is are attached.* As I mentioned earlier, we will be working our way through this process together, and developing our assessment program in relationship to the goals and values unique (and/or integral) to this institution. Additional readings are on reserve in the library, and an enormous amount of information is available on the web.
*Distributed at the Program Chairs meeting on 9.9.2008

MISSION
Maine College of Art delivers a demanding and enlivening education in visual art and design within an intimate learning community. We teach each student how to transform aspirations and values into a creative practice that serves as the foundation for a lifelong pursuit of personal and professional goals.

VALUES o Maine College of Art’s educational philosophy is built on the premise that focused individual attention and meaningful collective inquiry produce the conditions in which students’ voices can find strength, clarity, and purpose. o Our faculty of practicing professional artists, designers, writers, and scholars are committed and passionate educators who consider their classrooms to be extensions of their creative work. o We give our students the tools they need to take risks, think critically and…...

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