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Heart Transplant Patient

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MEMORANDUM

SUBJECT: Heart Transplant Patient

FROM: Jarrah P. Sanders
Lead Surgeon

TO: Cynthia Simon Professor

It has just been aware to me that a Heart has become available for one of the three canidents on our Transplant list. After extensive consideration, it is my recommendation that the newly found heart be given to Jerry. Jerry is a better fit for this transplant; he has better chances and a better outcome with getting the transplant.

After reviewing Ozzie’s chart, I felt as though he would not be a good recipient for this heart. I really appreciated the fact that he has been tutoring and mentoring to the youth, and he has signed a contract stating that if he got the transplant he would continue to tutor and stay clean for at least a year after the transplant. My concern is what happens after that year? The benefits to Ozzie getting the transplant would be he can continue to tutor the at risk youth that he has been helping and continue to make a difference in their lives. The harms of Ozzie getting this transplant would be him having a relapse and only waiting out that year before he began to use again. Even though this transplant would give him another 10 years or so to live Ozzie also has Recidivism which is sever with abuse and if he were to return to using again it would be a waste of the heart and he would die in a matter of months. Ozzie is a 38 year old man who has already wasted his life away on the choices that he has made with drugs, and I think he has been blessed to have found this shelter to help him live out the rest of his life clean.
Before even reviewing Lisa’s chart the first thing I saw was a 12 year old little girl. I think anyone would take a look at her chart and automatically give the heart to Lisa, because she’s young and could live a long happy life. After reviewing Lisa’s chart her benefits of this transplant…...

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