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Great Dialogues for Plato-Phaedo

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Great dialogues of Plato—Crito In this chapter, Plato talked about the dialogues between Socrates and Criton, Socrates’ best friend in his whole life. In this time, Socrates had already been put into prison by the unfair adjudgement in the court and he was waiting for the death penalty. When a Greek ship from Delos came back, he needed to get the death penalty. Before this time, Criton had visited Socrates for a few times, and tried to persuade him escape from this prison, but it was not worked. In the beginning of this dialogue, Socrates asked Criton, “Why have you come at this time of day”? He was sleeping and even forgot the time. Criton wanted to convince him leave the prison, and he had already found someone to help Socrates if he could escape. It must be the last time to get out from this prison, because the ship would come soon. However, Socrates refused his suggestion depending on his own opinion about moral and law. Then they began to debate by several aspects. Criton thought that he should leave the prison because he was guiltless. And he used a few ways to persuade him, just like, he let Socrates think of his sons and said “It is your power to bring them up and educate them, and now you will go off and leave them, and so far as you are concerned, they must take their life as they find it”. And they would be in orphan, if you leave them. He appealed by emotion to persuade him not giving up his life. On the other hand, Criton illustrated their friendship. If Socrates didn’t leave the prison, others who didn’t know them well would think Criton didn’t try his best to help him, and it may cause bad influence on Criton. But Socrates considered that if escaping is a moral thing, he could do that. Then Socrates mentioned two moral principles that he and Criton had persisted for a lot of years. First, anyone would not let others make mistakes, even if…...

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