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Finite Mathematics

In: Other Topics

Submitted By mrbrightside10
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*Week of November 18 -24 Thanksgiving Recess

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Required Text(s)/Software/Tools:
Finite Mathematics & its Applications and MyMathLab Student Access Kit (packaged with the th textbook), 10 Edition, Goldstein, Schneider, and Siegel, M.J., Prentice Hall, ISBN 9780321645098 (with solutions manual), or ISBN 978-0321744586 (without solutions manual)

Course Prerequisites: MTH 2002 College Algebra 2 Course Description
This course offers students an opportunity to develop skills in linear mathematics and probability. Topics include matrices, inverses, input-output analysis, linear programming, sets, counting, probability, and the mathematics of finance. Applications will be developed in business, economics, and the sciences.

Course Outcomes
Students will have the opportunity to 1. Develop competency in solving systems of equations using matrices 2. Understand how to set up and solve linear programming problems 3. Develop competency in using counting techniques, including the inclusion-exclusion principle, Venn Diagrams, and the Multiplication Principle 4. Differentiate between and to use Permutations and Combinations in counting 5. Become competent in calculating probabilities using various methods 6. Recognize and apply Markov Processes 7. Learn how to set up and solve Interest, Annuities, and Amortization problems

Course Methodology
Each week, you will be expected to: 1. Review the week's learning objectives 2. Complete all assigned readings 3. Complete all lecture materials for the week 4. Participate in the class discussion 5. Complete and submit all assignments and tests by the due dates Weekly objectives, readings, lectures, discussion board questions will be posted at www. Nuonline.neu.edu site. Assignments, quizzes, and exams will be posted on the MyMathLab site. This course requires access to MyMathLab which is acquired through the MyMathLab Student Access Kit (packaged with the textbook)

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Participation/Discussion Board
Students are expected to participate in discussions each week. Initial posts are due by Friday of the given week. Class participation is important and it is the student’s responsibility to complete discussion posts on time, and to ask questions, seek clarification on any material not fully understood. The instructor is available for assistance with material as indicated above. It is anticipated that this course will require a minimum of four hours of weekly reading, working practice problem sets, and completing assignments and assessments..

Communication/Submission of Work
Student’s performance will be evaluated on complete and timely submission of discussion board questions, quizzes, Midterm and Final Exams as indicated in grading section below. Assignments for each week of class will be provided at least one week in advance of the due dates. Course topics build on previous material such that you must master each topic as they are presented. Attempting to complete several chapters’ assignments right before the exam is detrimental to your learning and is strongly discouraged.

Grading/Evaluation Standards
Content Discussion Board Quiz average first missed quiz – no grade, additional missed quizzes – grade of “0” Midterm Exam Missed midterm – Final exam weighted 65% Final Exam ( cumulative ) Total: For further discussion of grading standards, see the CPS Student Handbook, at http://www.cps.neu.edu/student-services/student-handbook Total 10% 25% 25% 40% 100%

Assistance / Tutoring
You should contact your instructor when you are unable to complete an example or if you encounter frustration with the assignments. Do not wait until the next class, when you encounter the difficulty is the time to resolve it. My email and telephone number are listed above. The MyMathLab package that accompanies the Pearson Publication textbook provides access to a 24/7 online tutoring system. Pearson staffs this system with qualified instructors familiar with the material found in the book. The College of Professional Studies also provides a 24/7 online tutoring service through the Blackboard course management system called Smarthinking. All currently enrolled students in the College of Professional Studies may access this assistance by logging into Blackboard and selecting the Navigation link.

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Weekly class schedule Week Section 2.1-2.2 1 10/22 2.3 2.4 3.1-3.3 5.2 5.3 2 5.4 5.5 10/29 5.6 6.1 6.2 6.3 3 6.4 11/5 Midterm Exam (2.1 – 6.2) 6.5 4 11/12 6.6 8.1 8.2 8.3 11/19 10.1 5 10.2 11/26 10.3 6 12/3 Amortization Review Final Exam See MyMathLab See MyMathLab See MyMathLab Annuities See MyMathLab Conditional Probability and Independence Tree Diagrams The Transition Matrix Regular Stochastic Matrices Absorbing Stochastic Matrices Break – no classes Interest See MyMathLab See MyMathLab See MyMathLab See MyMathLab See MyMathLab See MyMathLab See MyMathLab Calculating Probabilities and Events See MyMathLab Topic Solving Systems of Linear Equations 1 Arithmetic Operations on Matrices The inverse of a matrix Linear Programming Fundamental Principle of Counting Venn Diagrams and Counting The Multiplication Principle Permutations and Combinations Further Counting Problems Introduction to Probability Experiments, Outcomes and Events Assignment of Probabilities Assignments See MyMathLab See MyMathLab See MyMathLab See MyMathLab See MyMathLab See MyMathLab See MyMathLab See MyMathLab See MyMathLab See MyMathLab See MyMathLab See MyMathLab

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Academic Integrity Policy
The University views academic dishonesty as one of the most serious offenses that a student can commit while in college and imposes appropriate punitive sanctions on violators. Here are some examples of academic dishonesty. While this is not an all-inclusive list, we hope this will help you to understand some of the things instructors look for. The following is excerpted from the University’s policy on academic integrity; the complete policy is available in the Student Handbook. The Student Handbook is available on the CPS Student Resources page > Policies and Forms. Cheating – intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information or study aids in an academic exercise Fabrication – intentional and unauthorized falsification, misrepresentation, or invention of any data, or citation in an academic exercise Plagiarism – intentionally representing the words, ideas, or data of another as one’s own in any academic exercise without providing proper citation Unauthorized collaboration – instances when students submit individual academic works that are substantially similar to one another; while several students may have the same source material, the analysis, interpretation, and reporting of the data must be each individual’s independent work. Participation in academically dishonest activities – any action taken by a student with the intent of gaining an unfair advantage Facilitating academic dishonesty – intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to violate any provision of this policy For more information on Academic Integrity, including examples, please refer to the Student Handbook, pages 9-11.

Northeastern University Online Policies and Procedures
For comprehensive information please go to http://www.cps.neu.edu/online/

Northeastern University Online Copyright Statement
Northeastern University Online is a registered trademark of Northeastern University. All other brand and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies. This course material is copyrighted and all rights are reserved by Northeastern University Online. No part of this publication may be reproduced, transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any language or computer language, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, magnetic, optical, chemical, manual, or otherwise, without the express prior written permission of Northeastern University Online. Copyright 2012 © by Northeastern University Online All Rights Reserved

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