Free Essay

Drriver

In: English and Literature

Submitted By DrRiver
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Pages 53
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Dear Educator,

Thank you for your interest in the change, growth and empowerment of Native Youth Education. This curriculum was developed specifically for educators in the state of Maine’s public high schools who wish to use this guide as a tool to improve Native Youth Education. NEG (Native Education Guide) provides lesson ideas and examples that support current lesson structures as well as implementing a culturally appropriate material for the Native Student. While many Native Education curriculums exist, NEG is designed to adapt to the block scheduling of the Public High School in Maine. This curriculum recognizes the appropriate education material needed for its intended audience, which focuses on the tribes of Maine whose youth attend Public High School.

NEG aims to provide its learners with a set of educational experiences that encourages empowerment and positive Native identity through community education. Native Education is the study of the human, tribal, environmental, historical and social experience of the Natives of Maine. Native Education is very complex with a lot of variables such as time, space, place and the students; NEG therefore focuses on a number of messages: - Community Building - Seventh Generation Sustainability, Economics and Ecology - School Education Policies and Institutions (Boarding Schools to Current Education Models) - Colonization and the “White Expansion” - Cultural Appropriation - Native Ritual, Ceremonies, Practices, Healing Circle - Dominant Religions and their Influence on Culture - Oppression vs. Empowerment - Healthy Relationships: Home, Peers and with Educators - Native Health: Culturally Appropriate Sex Educations, Native Sexuality, Native Gender, Roles, Relationships - Inherited Community Trauma - Resources: Native Based Support Groups, Clinics, Organizations - Movie and Media Portrayal of the Native American and First Nations (Rebuild Positive Native Identity) - Hierarchy and the ideology of leader of Sacred Rites - History of Tribes of Maine - Elders and Elderhood, Mentor, Leadership - Arts: Painting, Drawing, Creative Writing/Poetry and Spoken Word, Dance, basket weaving, pottery, jewelry, boat and home building - History and Significance of Pow-Wows - Native Museums: “Policies of Preserving Native Culture” – Historians of Native History - Oral Tradition, Folklore Tradition - Native Writers, Political Prisoners, Freedom Fighters, Modern Day Warriors and Native Public Speakers - Languages of the Tribes of Maine - Political Struggles of the Tribes of Maine: statehood, land preservation, environmental laws that the native way of living - History of Reservations to current Rez life - Linear History of Native Americans dissected and expanded to focus on the movements (Ghost Dance, AIM and Current) and tribes of Maine for the depth of the Native Experience. - American Indian War: Wounded Knee, Trail of Tears, Native American Leaders, Movements to Current Struggles - Education for Liberation

While culturally appropriate material is important throughout the Native students life, this curriculum is designed for the high school years. Educational and strong community influences are most important to me then because suddenly Native youth find themselves facing an earlier onset of adult responsibilities than their white peers. Their earlier transition to adulthood intersects with the oppression experienced by Native people and can lead to higher chance of dropping out, substance abuse, teen pregnancy and suicide. Based on my own experience, I know that many youth need genuine Native support to transition into being adults in this society that endangers Native people so systemically.
Integrating Native Curriculum into public schools can help meet empowerment goals through intentional education and community building.

Native Education Guide was developed with the Native students prosperity in mind. The curriculum provides lesson plans guides that allow educators to provide craft learning experiences that compliment their existing curriculum or program goals. By using a culturally appropriate curriculum to compliment your current program your efforts can expand your teaching capacity. Note this curriculum is not intended as a full Native Education. Developing a full strong and appropriate classroom of your own will require accessing Maine Native histories and Information by talking with experienced community members as well as local Natives and Elders. It will also require a deep commitment to decolonization from you the educator if you intend to do more good than harm. For this I recommend becoming clear on your position in colonization and your allegiances. If you are not Native American, are you indigenous? Have your people faced colonization? If not, are you an ally?

I hope this curriculum helps you establish a foundation or enhance Native Education in your current program. Thank you for your commitment and energy to providing Native Students with the culturally appropriate Education making an impact on the future of Native People.

Sincerely,

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Clay Muwin River

INTRODUCTION……………………………Page 5

CURRICULUM DESCRIPTION…………….Page 6

APPENDIX:

YEAR ONE……………………………..Page 8 - 13

September-December………………………….Page 8 – 11

January-June…………………………………...Page 12 – 13

YEAR TWO……………………………..Page 15 - 24

September-December……………………Page 15 - 18

January-June……………………………..Page 19 - 24

YEAR THREE…………………………...Page 26 - 35

September-December……………………Page 26 - 29

January-June……………………………..Page 30 - 35

YEAR FOUR……………………………..Page 37 - 42

September-December……………………Page 37 - 40

January-June……………………………..Page 41 - 42

RESOURCES………………………………………..Page 43 - 48

Maine schools start the first week of September and end the Second week of June. The schools are set up in what is called Block scheduling. This is usually organized by color-coded days using the schools colors, for example red day or white day. The traditional style was seven to eight periods a day, and students had every class everyday. The new style of Block scheduling allows for longer classroom time each day, instead of forty minutes everyday they are now eighty minutes every other day. In experiencing both styles I appreciate the block schedule as I found it allowed the teacher to not be rushed through the curriculum, there was room for questions and discussion. I have set up my guideline structure below to the block-scheduling format. I also followed two structures or two cycles where I separated topics in Fall (September through January) and Spring (February through June). In the second half of the year (spring Feb.-June) the first and fourth year students will have the same class. The fourth year students will present their senior projects to the first years on Monday, Wednesday and Fridays. On Tuesdays and Thursdays there will be group discussions and reflection journals about everyone’s learning process from the fourth year presentations. Alternative approaches could help build native community within these educational institutions. The Fourth year students are given the opportunity to practice educating and mentoring. The first year students are then in a position to interact with the older generation of students and be accepted in a classroom community to learn from each other.

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This curriculum is intended for the Native American Student in Public High School Education. Each lesson is linked to relevant and culturally appropriate material for freshmen to senior students. Adaptations to specific material will be necessary in accordance to region and tribal affiliation. However, all lessons are adapted for a broad Native Education throughout High School. The curriculum consists of four years of lesson plans. Each year contains new topics and goals. Within each semester of the lesson plan is a journal prompt, inviting students to reflect on their current learning experience, give creative response and discuss changes they would like to see for their education. Each week of the Curriculum gives short background information to support and guide the teaching lessons. This information is not intended for the students, but will hopefully guide your research as you build your lesson plans. This is also where you will find a schedule to help assist you with activity ideas. The vocabulary presented throughout the curriculum includes words necessary for your understanding of the content, which should be used as research and teaching prompts. Each week or month is an overview of a goal to accomplish during the lesson. It will be helpful to set your own learning objectives as well as a detailed process for proceeding through the activities. Throughout the lessons you will find that the material stresses the emphasis for Native role models, the placement of Native Elders is crucial at least until the primary educator is fully comfortable with presenting. Curriculum Contents: Lesson Plans, Back Ground Information, Hand Outs, Video

September

Theme: Community Building
Learning Objectives: During September, first year students will begin to feel at home with each other in a Native community. They will start this four-year First Nations program as a tribe.
Activities:
Week One [MWF Blocks]
During this week the students will get an introduction to the class program. Each day can be broken down into topics of discussion. Monday discussion: long term scope of the traditional High School learning experience in comparison to the Native Education they will be receiving in this new program. Wednesday: discussion about the importance of having a classroom of Native solidarity for their educational growth and empowerment. Friday: In addition to receiving a high school diploma, discuss other goals that are important to reach during this educational process.

Example: Have the students write down their goals and put them in a time capsule to be opened the first week in the start of their fourth year.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]
During this week the students will work together as a group to accomplish tasks as part of a community building exercise.

Example: A collective painting done by the native students, a native pride mural in the school.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]
During this week the students will participate in projects going on in their communities.

Example: Ask students for their ideas of which projects in their communities they would like to support as part of this program. And for additional information check your local library, community center, or tribal representatives. This may require a field trip exercise to venture out into the immediate native community to participate in the current community projects.

Week Four [TTH]
Students will participate in community service.

Example: Field trip to clean up each other’s neighborhoods and/or reservation. Raking, sweeping, collecting trash, painting and planting plants (this will be a project present throughout the years-sustainability and community gardening)

Materials/Resources: Shovels, rakes, soil, plants, trash bags, composition notebooks, paint, brushes, painting drop-cloth, and any other materials for service projects, field trips, and mural.

Evaluation: Each student should have a thoughtful journal entry in their composition notebook about their learning process this month. They should speak on their overall experience. Instructors should be looking for indication that students are having positive feelings about building their Native community at school.

Instructor Strategies: Instructors should strive to be in community with the students and the communities in which they come from. Look into forms of donation for gardening, obtaining free soil, flowers and tools for planting from local businesses. The students will reflect of how they see themselves fitting or not fitting into that community or how they can visualize change or improvement. Ask how the students see themselves being positive members of society. Encourage discussion.

October

Theme: Native Education History
Learning Objectives: Students will learn about positive Native role models in history, and have examined a positive elder in their own life. Students will be able to position their own educational experience within a wider understanding of what education could be and has been.

Week One [MWF Blocks]
Students will have group discussion about current school education policies.
Example: Look over the current school policies and education guidelines. What are schools required to teach? Ask the native students if they think the guidelines include their education as native people. In the process of standardizing education in the Unites States, who gets left out?

Week Two [TTH Blocks]
Dissect different educational structures
Example: Home school. Public school. Private school. Traditional Native learning. Institutionalized learning. These are all different educational structures. Discuss pros and cons, experiences with them, and any others students can dream of, including hybrids. Ask students to think of and share the story of a positive elder in their own life and if they know what educational structure they experienced when they were younger.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]
Discuss Learning Institutions: Boarding Schools to Prison to the Modern Education System.
Example: Discuss “Kill the Indian, Save the Man”, a quote by the founder of the first assimilationist boarding school. Show image included in resource section. Compare and contrast different learning institutions. Prison can be considered a “learning” institution because of how prisons are so-called places where people “learn” from their mistakes. How are people treated similarly or differently in each of the different learning institutions of society?

Week Four [TTH Blocks]
Discuss racism in education and continue conversation about native solidarity as a part of public high school education experience.
Example: Teach the students skills to be able to find their Native history within mainstream curriculum and expand upon the little of Native history that is found in typical textbooks. Have students open up their American History books. Using the index, see how long it takes them to find a Native person portrayed in a positive way. Stop them when it takes too long, and make the point that these textbooks are not good for them. Then students and/or the instructor can insert a positive elder role model into that history.

Materials/Resources: “Kill the Indian, Save the Man” image in resource section.
Evaluation: Make sure that students are demonstrating a growing knowledge of a history of Native education that’s relevant to them. Are they making connections between themes of different weeks? Are thy making connections between boarding schools, prisons, and their own education institution? What about through history, the boarding schools of the past and the text books omitting Native history of the present?
Instructor Strategies: Instructors should try to learn the history of how educational structures have changed for the tribes in their area and from who their students come from. Instructors should get an idea of a few role models they want to teach about for week four. Try to always engage with what students already know and build from there.

November

Theme: Colonization, Displacement and Cultural Appropriation

Learning Objectives: Students will learn about white expansion and how this unfolded geographically. Students will have a more complex understanding of the multiplicity of Thanksgiving narratives from Native and colonist perspectives. Students will be able to identify a variety of forms of cultural appropriation. Students will be able to parallel historical colonization with current colonization i.e. gentrification and see the parallels as evidence of a continued struggle.

Week One [MWF Blocks] • Discuss European colonization and the white expansion
Example: Ask students what they already know about colonization. Talk about the region’s first encounter with white people. Always make sure discussion is focused on the Native perspective. Ask students to share what they would have done if they were living during their tribes’ first encounter with white settlers and colonists. Imagine this country not as one country, but as a land, with very different borders, no states like today’s, governed not by one U.S. government that represents Native students poorly, but by totally different governing bodies made completely of Aboriginal people. What does that mean for the Native youth of today? Discuss and journal.

Week two [TTH Blocks]

• Discuss cultural appropriation, talk about thanksgiving “thanks-taking” and the native history of this event and the process to its glamorized holiday.
Example: Ask students how they feel about the Thanksgiving holiday. Compare different tribes’ accounts of the Thanksgiving story. Differences in which time of year Thanksgiving occurred and the degree of violence surrounding the interaction might emerge from this discussion. What could this mean? Have students’ journal about their own experiences around the portrayal of Native people in their early education of Thanksgiving. Their experiences will depend on from who they received their early education. Talk about other forms of cultural appropriation, like the objectification of Native identity for mascots of sports teams, and the theft of spiritual symbolisms such as the appropriation of dream catchers and medicine wheels by non-native people. How does this make student’s feel?

Week Three [“thanksgiving” November Vacation]

Week Four [MWF Blocks] • Discuss gentrification
Example: Where do we each live? Why do we live there? Who lives around us? Look back at the maps of white expansion and state borders to compare gentrification to colonization. Talk about the displacement of people through history.

Materials/Resources: Maps of white expansion and state and national borders over the history of colonization.
Evaluation: Make sure that students demonstrate in discussion and in their journal that they can identify how cultural appropriation, gentrification, and colonization are affecting their lives today and have affected the lives of their elders.

Instructor Strategies: Frame discussion from the Native perspective to affirm Native voices. Find old maps of white expansion and find accounts from a Native perspective of what first encounters with white people were like. Show maps over time illustrating how the United States began to take over Native lands, draw state lines, and create reservations to where Native people were displaced.

December

Theme: Spirituality

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to create and implement ritual in their own life. They will be able to recognize ritual as a part of healthy Native identity.

Week One [TTH Blocks]
Discuss Native Ritual, Ceremonies and Practices
Example: Ask students to contribute any knowledge they may have about their own tribe’s spiritual practices. Ask them if they have any personal rituals that reflect their identity. Instructor can add information about the ceremonies and practices of the tribes represented by the students.

Week Two [MWF Blocks]
Discuss cultural, community and space healing
Example: Now that students are experiencing a strong Native community in their schools we will return together to the Native way of understanding life and knowledge. We will return to the circle and think about all the things represented by the circle in our culture, communities, and healing spaces.

Week Three [TTH Blocks]
Discuss dominant religions in our immediate communities and how we see their influence in culture.
Example: Christmas is coming up. How does the predominance of Christmas affect our ability to celebrate Native holidays? When we focus on the traditions of colonizers, how does this affect our ability to focus on our own traditions? Is the effect a colonizing one? What are ways we can decolonize our histories, our present days, and our holidays? What happens to our identities as Native people when we get caught up in the dominant narrative that is from the perspective of white people? I.e. Fourth of July as a “celebration of independence”. Did the development of the Fourth of July as a holiday denote independence and freedom for Native people?

Week Four [Holiday Vacation Week]

Materials/Resources: Need contact information and an idea of where to look to ask elders to visit and teach Native youth. Need resources on rituals and practices of region’s tribes as well as any other local religions that the students interact with and there fore affects their perception of spirituality. Need examples of rituals to base students’ togetherness ritual on.

Evaluation: In their journals students will write about finding peace of mind through ritual and will imagine ways they can bring ritual into their life outside of the Native youth space at school, and to their life at home. Look for evidence that students are finding self-fulfillment through their practices of personal and communal ritual as self care and community care.

Instructor Strategies: Throughout this month invite elders to come share with the students a practice or a ritual. This month’s focus on spirituality will culminate in the making of a ritual. This ritual will start each class with a sense of togetherness and will intentionally bring spiritual energy into their shared learning space. What this ritual will look like will depend on what the class makes together.

January

Theme: Oppression and Empowerment

Learning Objectives: Students will be able to create and implement Empowerment in their own life. They will be able to recognize oppression and unhealthy relationships. They will be able to target their own learning styles and understand them. They will be prepared to trust and learn form their peers.

Week One [MWF Blocks]
Discuss oppression
Example: Ask students to contribute any knowledge they may have about their own feelings of oppression. Ask them if they have any personal empowerment practices that reflect their positive native identity. Instructor can add information about the history of native oppression and empowerment projects practiced by other tribes and native communities.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]

Empowerment, student groups make lists of ways toward empowerment

Example: Have the students research other native youth empowerment projects. Have reflection discussions about what they learned from other students. Have them create their own piece of work such as a video, or written work to share with other Native communities to be apart of a larger youth learning circle.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]
Relationships and Trust Building with our peers and Educators
Example: Ask the question: How do we learn from each other in a positive way? Prepare the students for the second half of the year where they will be learning from the fourth year student’s senior project proposal workshops.

Week Four [TTH Blocks]

Example: Have the students discuss ways they would want to talk about their learning experience. How they are going to record their learning to be able to share it with other generations. Have the students talk about their different learning styles and how they plan to execute them. Have the students draw brain maps (ways of visual and verbally learning) as a practice entry into not taking from the presentations of the fourth year students.

Materials/Resources: Need contact information to collaborate with other native youth empowerment projects. Need resources on youth empowerment practices. Video camera, Internet, Composition Notebook

Evaluation: Make sure that students demonstrate in discussion and in their journal that they can identify what they know about oppression. And how positive native identity and empowerment projects are affecting their lives today and what affect it will have on the future of native people.

Instructor Strategies: Throughout this month the Instructor can create group discussions to target examples of oppression of native youth as well as create examples of ways to empower each other. Ask students to contribute any knowledge they may have about their own feelings of oppression. Ask them if they have any personal empowerment practices that reflect their positive native identity. Instructor can add information about the history of native oppression and empowerment projects practiced by other tribes and native communities.

February

Week one [MWF Blocks]: Fourth Year Presentations
Week two [TTH Blocks]: Fourth Year Presentations
Week Three [MWF Blocks]: February Vacation
Week Four [TTH Blocks]: Journal writing of learning Process, reflection and class discussion of fourth year presentations.

March

Week one [MWF Blocks]: Fourth Year Presentations
Week Two [TTH Blocks]: Process, Reflect, and Discuss Presentations
Week Three [MWF Blocks]: Fourth Year Presentations
Week Four [TTH Blocks]: Process, Reflect, and Discuss Presentations

April

Week one [MWF Blocks]: Fourth Year Presentations
Week two [TTH Blocks]: Fourth Year Presentations
Week Three [MWF Blocks]: April Vacation
Week Four [TTH Blocks]: Journal writing of learning Process, reflection and class discussion of presentations.

May

Week one [MWF Blocks]: Fourth Year Presentations
Week Two [TTH Blocks]: Process, Reflect, and Discuss Presentations
Week Three [MWF Blocks]: Fourth Year Presentations
Week Four [TTH Blocks]: Process, Reflect, and Discuss Presentations

June

Week one [MWF Blocks]: Process, Reflect, and Discuss Presentations
Week Two [TTH Blocks]: Participate in Native youth journey rituals/practices.
Week Three [MWF Blocks]: Participate in Fourth Year Students Graduation Ceremonies.
Week Four [TTH Blocks]: Summer Vacation Starts

September

Theme: Sexuality, Gender, and Relationships
Learning Objectives: Students will practice thinking critically about colonialism and dominant society’s affect on their self-image, sexuality, gender, and ultimately their relationships.

Week One [MWF Blocks]:
-Discuss Native American sexuality, gender, and relationships.
Example: Have students watch Two-Spirit, a film about native gender identity. Read excerpts from Mark Rifkin’s book, When Did Indians Become Straight. Discuss how the “straightening” of native gender identity is part of colonialism. Discuss similarities between first year discussion of boarding schools and their “save the man, kill the Indian” campaign and erasing original native gender expression and enforcing conformity to white signifiers and expressions of gender, which were very different culturally from native expressions of gender. Invite a two-spirit native person to come and speak with the class. Ask students how they do or do not conform to mainstream ideas of what it means to be the right kind of girl or the right kind of boy.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]:
-Self-teaching about native sexual health and sexualities through researching community education projects.
Example: Have students’ research Native based support groups, clinics and organizations that focus on Native sexual health and sexuality (include LGBT groups). Ask students to come up with ideas for how native youth can express their sexualities in ways that lower their risks and maximize their mental and bodily health.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]:
- Students will learn to identify media portrayals of native sexuality.
Example: Dissect the history of movie and media portrayal of Native Americans, and discuss the effects of these portrayals on rebuilding positive native identity. (see 1. over-sexualized images of Native Men in Twilight, 2. over-sexualized and exotified portrayal of Pocahontas in the Disney movie, and 3. where is the sexuality of the many obedient, noble-savage characters in Westerns?)Are the portrayals of native identity in dominant society controlled by native people?

Week Four [TTH Blocks]:
- Students will practice having positive feelings about their own sexualities
Example: How do these objectifying and over-sexualized portrayals of native people from last week affect our self-image? How can we create our own identities that are rooted in a native context and not a white-run media portrayal? Students can discuss different kinds of relationships and different relationship dynamics they see around themselves. What do they like about what they see and what don’t they like? Are positive self-images necessary for healthy relationships? Do we need to love ourselves to love each other?

Materials: Movie clips from Twilight, Mash-up by Samantha Figueroa of Adreil Luis’ poem Slip of the Tongue and Disney’s Pocahontas on YouTube. Resource list of community education projects that deal with native sexuality and sexual health.
Evaluation: Make sure students participate in discussion and journal writings about a diversity of gender identities and sexualities. That they engage with two-spiritedness and LGBT visibility and inclusion. Look for students articulating positive self-image about their bodies, genders, sexualities, and native identity. Were students able to name negative aspects in relationships in their lives? Are they identifying ways that they can change dynamics that aren’t working for them? Are they making connections between colonialism and youth, gender, and sexuality oppression?
Instructor Strategies: In discussion on sexuality and gender, be inclusive and make sure students are empowered to make their own choices around their gender expression and sexuality exploration. Aim to make the classroom a space where students build pride around their native youth sexualities and genders and therefore feel both self-love and grounded in their choices. Remind them that they may be fluid, and try one thing out today and change it tomorrow.

October
Theme: Society Hierarchy compared to Native Community Structure
Learning Objectives: Students will be able to identify hierarchies. Students will develop critical thinking skills to determine their relationship to hierarchy as a native person. Students will be able to recognize who and what inspires them and the qualities they have within themselves to inspire and empower their peers and community.

Week One [MWF Blocks] - Students will investigate how hierarchies in imperialist religious ideology were imposed on native spirituality. Example: discuss Hierarchy: 1. Any system of persons or things ranked one above another. (Or arranged in a graded order like the school system) 2. Government by ecclesiastical rulers. 3. The power or dominion of a hierarch.
Compare Native Spirituality where beliefs and practices form an integral and seamless part of their very being to Catholicism, where there is a leader of sacred rites.
Have students identify the hierarchical nature of religions they are familiar with.
Then bring it to a more complex discussion. How did adopting Catholicism and encoding native spirituality within it, and therefore making versions of Catholicism that were distinctively native, help ensure the survival of native people and therefore become part of native struggle and resistance? Are there any examples of this that students can see in their own lives? (Research Kateri Tekakwitha aka Lily of the Mohawk)

Week Two [TTH Blocks]:
- Discuss leadership and roles within the local tribes.
Example: Have the students write about their own roles they currently fill in their tribe or native community and where they see themselves functioning in their tribe/native community in the future.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]:
- Talk about Elders and Elder-hood as it applies to the student’s tribes.
Example: Have the students be in a group dialogue about what they think Elder means or represents. Have the students come up with different examples or representations of Elderhood as an ageless, status less and non-linear experience. Have the students identify who they see acting as Elders in their Tribe, Native Community and/or learning spaces.

Week Four [TTH Blocks]:
- Open group discussion about taking steps towards mentoring younger generations
Example: Have the students identify whom they see as their mentor and what characteristics that person has that inspired the student. What other traits would the students like to see in their mentors? What sort of mentoring qualities can the students identify within themselves and what do they think/feel they can offer generations younger then themselves.

Materials: Internet for research
Evaluation: Do students show an understanding of society’s hierarchy? Have they articulated a difference between native spirituality and dominant religions? Have they made a connection between colonialism and dominant religions? In these transitional adolescent times how do they see themselves developing into elders in different areas of their lives?

Instructor Strategies:
Come prepared with ideas for diagrams for hierarchical structures and recognize with students the difficulty of using tools like diagrams and other colonist methodologies to conceptualize and portray native existence.

November

Theme: Share and make native art.
Learning Objectives: Students will remember/learn that there are many different kinds of native art. They will make their own art. And they will process Thanksgiving vacation with the first year students.

Week One [MWF Blocks]
- Group discussions about the Arts in the students tribes; baskets, canoes, jewelry etc.
Example: Give time for show/tell of family/personal tribal art.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]:
- Practice various styles of native art within material limitation.
Example: Decorate baskets with beads and feathers. Make clay pots.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]:
- [Vacation]

Week Four [TTH Blocks]: - Debrief and process Thanksgiving experiences.
Example: They can do this with first year students since they just had lessons on cultural appropriation and may have had intense vacations.
- Continue art projects. Suggest that these be an offering to first year students.

Materials: art supplies such as baskets, beads, feather, glue, string, clay, newspaper, and water dishes.
Evaluation: Have students completed art pieces? Did they see creating art as an empowering experience? If this is the first year of the program, how did second year students due in processing session with first years?
Instructor Strategies: Make sure students can see themselves as creators of native art. Make sure that they know that anything they make is native art since they are native. This will help the art making feel free of constraints of what it should look like.

December

Theme: Pow-Wows
Learning Objectives: Students will become familiarized with the tradition of Pow-Wows and will participate in one.

Week One [MWF Blocks]
- History and significance of Pow Wows
Example: Students who have attended Pow-Wows will share stories and talk about their experiences in these spaces with their peers. - Students will brainstorm their involvement in a Pow Wow. How would they contribute or participate?

Week Two [TTH Blocks]:
-Continue History and Significance of Pow-Wows
Example: Elders can be invited into the space to share their history with the tradition of Pow-Wows.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]: - Native Students in school will have a Pow-wow space that is available.
Example: invite outside native community to participate or watch student’s dance/sing or show their artwork.

Week Four [TTH Blocks]:

[Winter holiday vacation]

Materials: Pow-Wow videos, Venue for student Pow-Wow

Evaluation: The students are able to define a Pow-Wow in a native communal sense and also what it means to them in a personal way. The students are showing community participation and are working well in a group setting.

Instructor Strategies: Make sure the students find an active role in this community exercise. Find videos on Pow-Wows to show the students a short history and tradition of their tribes, Contact Elders to come in for class discussion on local Pow-Wows, Prepare a space for the students to hold their own Pow-Wow in which they will be able to invite their families, tribe members and other native circles and communities to participate.

January

Theme: Native Art History
Learning Objectives: Students will be able to recognize the art of the tribes in their region. Students will be able to understand the policies that were written to preserve our culture, specifically the art forms.

Week One [MWF Blocks] - Expand the history of Native Art and explore the artwork of tribes in North America. Example: The students will use library resources and the Internet to find examples of authentic native art pieces from tribes of all parts of North America. The students will participate in a group discussion about the similarities and differences in these pieces of art.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]: - Practice presenting different art pieces and work with the students to identify, region and tribe the art is from. Example: The students will continue to identify the art pieces and match them to their correct regions. The students will start to work towards being able to articulate the art form, technique and time period.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]: - Discuss the histories of Native American Museums and the policies of preserving Native culture. Example: The students will take a field trip to the closest Native Museum as a critique exercise. The critique will be a post tour write-up about the art pieces, styles and tribes they could identify. The students will watch a video on local and national museum policies for preserving native culture.

Week Four [TTH Blocks]: - Give the students tools to be able to decipher authentic native art to replicated or appropriated art. Example: The students will use their knowledge from the activities throughout the month to play a “real or fake” authentic native art test game with pre-chosen art pieces.

Materials: Library, Internet, Native Art pieces from the region, Pictures of Native Art from many different tribes of North America, Video on Museum preservation Policies.

Evaluation: The students can identify the authenticity, year, technique and region of an assortment of Native Art.

Instructor Strategies: Make sure the students understand the importance of the identity of authentic art verse replicated native art forms. Prepare library time. Prepare a video on Museum preservation Policies; prepare pictures and physical pieces of art to be used in the “fake or real” identification game.

February

Theme: Oral Histories
Learning Objectives: The students will learn about the oral traditions of their tribes. The students will present their own story and/or presentation.

Week one [MWF Blocks]:

- History of Oral Tradition Example: The students will read short excerpts on definitions of oral tradition. The students will watch a video of Native Elders speaking about oral tradition as well as sharing different techniques of spoken word and story telling.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]:

- Study Oral histories of individual tribes of students Example: The students will use library resources; Internet and/or family records to learn about their tribe’s oral histories, meaning the history of their people passed down to them through the art form of spoken word and story telling-the oral tradition.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]:

- [Vacation] send home a journal with students for them to write their own stories/histories to memorize and give oral presentation when they return.

Week Four [TTH Blocks]:

- Share oral histories Example: The students will read their own personal stories out of their journals that are either real or fictitious. The students could also choose to share family stories that were passed down to them through story telling. Video records the students for their own use to take home and watch.

Materials: Video of Native Elders speaking about oral tradition, Composition Notebooks for Journaling, Library, Internet, video camera
Evaluation: The students show an understanding of oral histories. The students participated in the presentation and performed their own spoken word piece or story.
Instructor Strategies: Make sure the students understand the importance of oral tradition to the Native Experience and how it is different from other forms of recording history. Prepare a video of Native Elders speaking about oral tradition. Set up library and Internet time. Set up Video for the students to record their oral presentations.

March

Theme: Folklore
Learning Objectives: The students will learn about the Folklore of their tribes. The students will present their own folklore.

Week one [MWF Blocks]:

- History of Folklore Example: The students will read short excerpts on definitions of Folklore. The students will watch a video of Native Elders speaking about Folklore as well as sharing different styles of folklore.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]:

- Study Folklore of individual tribes of students Example: The students will use library resources; Internet and/or family records to learn about their tribe’s Folklore, meaning the Tales of their people passed down to them through the art form of written word and story telling-Folklore.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]:

- Modern day folklore of a Modern Day Native Example: The students will practice comparison writing of modern day folklore with older folklore, find similarities and differences

Week Four [TTH Blocks]:

- Writing practices of Folklore writing, give time to share with group each other’s own folklore. Example: The students will read their own personal folklore out of their journals. The students could also choose to share family Folklore that was passed down to them. Publish the students Folklore into a collective Zine for their own personal use and keeping.

Materials: Video of Native Elders speaking about Folklore, Composition Notebooks for Journaling, Library, Internet, Zine Material; photo copier, side stapler
Evaluation: The students show an understanding of Folklore. The students participated in the presentation and read their own Folklore.
Instructor Strategies: Make sure the students understand the importance of Folklore to the Native Experience and how it is different from other forms of storytelling. Prepare a video of Native Elders speaking about Folklore. Set up library and Internet time. Set up a Zine materializing station for the students to copy, practice layout and staple their zines together.

April

Theme: Creative Writing
Learning Objectives: The students will learn about the Writing of their tribes both past and present. To include the tribes who may not have had long histories of written word. The students will present their own creative writing pieces.

Week one [MWF Blocks]:

- Introduction to creative writing, as it applies to the processes of writing style of Natives Example: The students will read short excerpts on Native writing styles. The students will watch a video of Native Elders speaking about Writing as well as sharing different styles of Writing.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]:

- Discuss current Native Writers Example: The students will use library resources; Internet and/or family records to learn about current Native writers inside and outside of their own tribe; Sharing the words of struggle, resistance, freedom, native identity and sense of place of their people passed down to them through the art form of written word.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]:

- [Vacation] Journaling (Practicing Creative Writing)

Week Four [TTH Blocks]: - Share poems/creative writing pieces

Materials: Video of Native Elders speaking about Writing, Composition Notebooks for Journaling, Library, Internet, Zine Material; photo copier, side stapler
Evaluation: The students show an understanding of Creative Writing and its many forms. The students participated in the presentation and read their own Creative Writing.

Instructor Strategies: Make sure the students understand the importance of their writing for their self-growth and to the overall Native Experience. Guide the students to understanding how writing is different from other forms of storytelling and the importance of such physical expression and preservation. Prepare a video of Native Elders speaking about writing. Set up library and Internet time. Set up a Zine materializing station for the students to copy, practice layout and staple their zines together of their creative writing.

May

Theme: Native Sustainability – “Rooted Survival”
Learning Objectives: The students will gain knowledge about farming and sustainability. The students will be able to apply what they have learned to their own lives and use the community garden to show they have learned self-sustainability and traditional native growing as a rooted survival.

Week One [MWF Blocks]
- Sustainability
Example: The students will research and share information on different styles of sustainability. The students will watch a video on Seventh Generation Sustainability (Native Sustainability Ideology) and write about how they are going to apply 7G to their own lives.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]:
-Rooted Native survival
Example: The students will Discuss traditional native sustainability and how it has changed to modern day sustainability; discuss in group idea sharing how Native life has been effected by changes to their self sustainability and what changes can be made about it.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]:
- Community Garden
Example: The students will start their own planting in and/or outside the classroom, these gardens will be maintained by other native students in other years, an ongoing contribution to a community garden.

Week Four [TTH Blocks]:
-Garden Design
Example: Students will design gardens in their journals as well as reflect on what they have been learning about the importance of growing our own food.

Materials: Library; Video on Seventh Generation Sustainability, Internet, Journal, Seeds, shovels, clippers, gloves, popsicle sticks for labels, Garden space outside of school, Pots for Inside Window Garden.
Evaluation: Have the students shown an understanding of Seventh Generation sustainability? Can the students maintain their own garden space? The students should be able to identify weeds from plants and name the plants in the garden.
Instructor Strategies: Make sure the students can show a sense of knowledge about the garden and confidence that they can support their own growing. Make sure that the students are knowledgeable about how to start and sustain a garden. The Instructor will care through garden throughout summer invite students to stop by throughout summer to help out.

June

Theme: Native Agriculture and Environment
Learning Objectives: The students will gain knowledge about Agricultural and Environmental effects to the Native people as well as the importance of the two to our survival. The students will be able to apply what they have learned to their own lives and use the community garden to show they have learned horticulture and agriculture.

Week One [MWF Blocks]
- Native American agriculture and horticulture
Example: The students will research and discuss the definitions and examples of agriculture (gross domestic products, larger scale food production) and horticulture (smaller scale growing of fruits, berries, nuts, vegetables, flowers, trees, shrubs). The students will identify the differences between the two. The students will then write about which style they would like to practice.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]:
- Health impacts on Native American reproduction and survival as well as other environmental impacts on the Native people.
Example: Watch the movie Homeland produced by Katahdin Productions (Netflix) that profiles four tribes and their struggles against environmental racism. Discuss the nature of native resistance and connect present day resistance to historical resistance (last 500 years). Build a sense of continuity between the past and the present.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]:
- Discuss native’s relationship with their physical environments.
Example: Have the class research non-identity based environmental groups. This means organizations that do not see their mission rooted in where they come from. Look for organizations that intend to represent “everyone’. For the purpose of this exercise, differentiate between these mainstream environmentalists and the people that we see in Homeland. Debate the differences between environmentalists and Natives.

Week Four [TTH Blocks]:

Summer Vacation Starts

Materials: Library; movie Homeland, Internet, Journal, Seeds, shovels, clippers, gloves, popsicle sticks for labels, Garden space outside of school, Pots for Inside Window Garden.
Evaluation: Have the students shown an understanding of their environment and the importance of Agriculture to Native people? Can the students articulate the Health impacts on Native American reproduction and survival as well as other environmental impacts on the Native people?
Instructor Strategies: Make sure the students can show a sense of knowledge about the different styles of growing (horticulture and large scale). Make sure that the students understand the importance of growing our own food as native people. The Instructor will care for the garden throughout summer invite students to stop by throughout summer to help out and “sustain” the garden.

September

Theme: Native Ecology and Economics
Learning Objectives: Have the students learn about the history of Native Ecology: That for thousands of years indigenous people have learned about the Earth's changing environment through careful observation of animals, as well as of the stars, sun and moon. The planting and harvesting of crops, hunting, fishing, and rituals were timed to celestial movements and changing seasons. Guide the students to find their intimate connection with the Earth, help the students understand that natives are not separate from nature, that we are all a part of the natural environment that sustains us.

Week One [MWF Blocks]

- Native American Ecology Example: On day one have the students collect plants, water and soil from the woods nearby. Have the students use their journals to draw up diagrams of their findings and have them make observations of the details to the soil, water and plant health.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]:

- Natives sustainably harvesting resources Example: Have the students first research the plants that naturally grow in the region. On the next day have the students try to find these plants surviving in the local woods. The collections will be placed on a large ecosystem map the students will draw up to show how the plants are self sustained in their environment.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]:

- Native Economics Example: Have the students’ research and analyze the production and distribution of Native plants to the region. Have the students discuss how this market is depleting the resource as well as affecting the native people. Have the students also research and discuss European transplants that affect the regions ecosystems.

Week Four [TTH Blocks]: - Ecosystems Example: The students will create models of self-sustaining ecosystems; have them explain how they fit into the bigger picture and if they are supportive to Native lifestyle.

Materials: Containers for collecting Samples, Large Paper for Ecosystem Maps, glue, markers, labels.
Evaluation: Have the students shown an understanding of the function of Ecosystems? Can the students articulate the impacts of pollution and other factors on the Earths Ecosystem?
Instructor Strategies: Help the students identify and collect samples from the woods. Make sure that the students understand their place and function in an ecosystem.

October

Theme: Land Preservation
Learning Objectives: Students will practice thinking critically about laws affecting the native way of living. The students will be able to define statehood and preservation laws and policies.

Week One [MWF Blocks] - Understanding Statehood Example: The students will use library and Internet sources to come up with definitions for Statehood. They will also present an example of statehood as it applies or is in reference to the Native experience.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]: - Land preservation laws and policies; how these laws effect natives Example: The students will use library and Internet sources to come up with definitions for land preservation. They will also present the current laws and policies in their region for land preservation. They will journal about how they feel the land preservation is affecting the Native people.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]: - Fishing and hunting laws effect native ways of living and survival Example: The students will use library and Internet sources to determine what the current fishing and hunting laws are in the state of Maine. The students will share from their journals the writing on land preservation affecting the native people; this will lead into a group discussion about the fishing/hunting laws presenting the similar affect.

Week Four [TTH Blocks]: - Researching and reporting on modern day land preservations
Example: The students will present the current laws and policies in their region for land preservation. The students will use library and Internet sources to find articles and other writings on the current legal battles of Natives with current land preservation. The students will identify and define what this means for the future of the native people of the region.

Materials: Library; Native Archives Law books, Policy Books, Internet, Journal
Evaluation: Have the students shown an understanding of land preservation policies and fishing and hunting laws affecting the native way of living? The students should be able to identify the pros and cons to modern day land preservation.
Instructor Strategies: Make sure the students can see themselves being affected by land preserve policies. Make sure that they know that the future of native peoples relies on the amount of land the Native people have left to freely live on.

November

Theme: Reservations
Learning Objectives: The Students will show an understanding of the History of Reservations. The students will be able to articulate their experience with reservation life or what they have not experienced.

Week One [MWF Blocks] - Reservations Example: The students will name the reservations in the state of Maine. The students will research information about these reservations and share the information in a class group discussion.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]: - History of Reservations to Modern day Rez life Example: The students will research the history of Reservations and the land wars that resulted in homes with borders. The students will identify the living conditions on reservations throughout generations to current Rez life.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]: - Modern day Native urban survival Example: The students will have a comparison discussion on the difference of reservations to Natives current urban living. The students will work in groups to identify cause/effect and pro/cons of the different lifestyles of current Native survival and living.

Week Four [TTH Blocks]:

- Land Rights Example: The students will research and discuss current political struggles of Maine Natives. The students will write in the journals about what change they would like to see come from these political battles.

Materials: Library; Native Archives on Reservations, Internet and Journal.
Evaluation: Have the students shown an understanding of the histories of Reservations? Can the students articulate how they see the forced living and/or bordered homes affecting the native way of living? The students should be able to identify the pros and cons to modern day native urban survival.
Instructor Strategies: Make sure the students can see themselves being affected by the histories of Reservations. Make sure that they know that the future of native peoples relies on the amount of land the Native people have left to freely live on.

December

Theme: Native Language
Learning Objectives: The students will study the languages of the present tribes of Maine, as their languages are very similar the students will use exercises to find the similarities and differences within the languages.

Week one [MWF Blocks]: - Study the language of the Maliseet as a group Example: The students will use library and Internet resources to find the written Maliseet Language. The students will practice basic vocabulary of the tribe such as the alphabet, greetings and action verbs. The students will watch a video of a Maliseet Person speaking in Maliseet. The students will journal what they notice about the language to later compare the language to other tribes of Maine.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]: - Study the language of the Penobscot as a group Example: The students will use library and Internet resources to find the written Penobscot Language. The students will practice basic vocabulary of the tribe such as the alphabet, greetings and action verbs. The students will watch a video of a Penobscot Person speaking in Penobscot. The students will journal what they notice about the language to later compare the language to other tribes of Maine.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]: - Study the language of the Passamaquoddy as a group Example: The students will use library and Internet resources to find the written Passamaquoddy Language. The students will practice basic vocabulary of the tribe such as the alphabet, greetings and action verbs. The students will watch a video of a Passamaquoddy Person speaking in Passamaquoddy. The students will journal what they notice about the language to later compare the language to other tribes of Maine.

Week Four [TTH Blocks]: - Study the language of the Micmac as a group Example: The students will use library and Internet resources to find the written Micmac Language. The students will practice basic vocabulary of the tribe such as the alphabet, greetings and action verbs. The students will watch a video of a Micmac Person speaking in the language of the Micmac. The students will journal what they notice about the language to later compare the language to other tribes of Maine.
Materials: Video of Native Elders speaking in their language, Composition Notebooks for Journaling, Library, Internet.
Evaluation: The students show an understanding of Native Maine Languages and its many forms. The students participated in the language exercises by practicing the reading, writing and speaking of each native language of Maine.
Instructor Strategies: Make sure the students understand the importance of their tribe’s language for their self-growth and to the overall survival of their tribe. Guide the students to understanding how language is a form of physical expression and preservation. Set up library and Internet time. Set up language videos for the students to watch.

January
Theme: Tribal Language
Learning Objectives: The students will study and/or practice the language of their own tribe.

Week one [MWF Blocks]: - Have the students practice writing exercises in their own tribes language Example: The students will use personal, library and Internet resources to find the written language of their tribe. The students will practice more in depth vocabulary of their tribe such as writing complete sentences and practicing speaking these sentences.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]: - Have the students find books, articles or family writings in the language of their tribe. Example: The students will use personal, library and Internet resources to find their written language in forms of books, articles and family/peer writings. The students will practice translating and reading these works. The students will read a short piece to their peers using the language of their tribe.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]:
- Language Translation
Example: The students will practice translation exercises from the reading materials of their tribe’s language into another language of their choice. The students will continue to journal about what they are learning about language and what similarities and differences they continue to learn about.

Week Four [TTH Blocks]:
-Anthology
Example: The students’s work throughout the week on a creative writing piece in their own language to be submitted at the end of week. The collection of these writings will be put together into an Anthology to be placed into the school library for other native students to access over generations. Other students can use these anthologies as the chosen pieces for language practices in the future.
Materials: Composition Notebooks for Journaling, Library, and Internet. Anthology Material; photo copier, small printing press publisher by Natives.
Evaluation: The students show a basic understanding of their tribe’s language. The students participated in the language exercises by practicing the reading, writing and speaking of their language. The students submitted a writing piece into the Anthology.
Instructor Strategies: Make sure the students understand the importance of their tribe’s language for their self-growth and to the overall survival of their tribe. Guide the students to understanding how language is a form of physical expression and preservation. Set up library and Internet time. Small Publication of Anthology and place in school library and/or Internet accessible.

February

Theme: Native History
Learning Objectives: The students will use their school provided history books as a starting point to deconstructing the white history stories. The students will begin to understand the difference in linear timeline of events in comparison to the Native state of being. The students will research and learn in depth about movements and Native people that paved the way for our current existence as Native people.

Week one [MWF Blocks]:
- Historians of native history Example: The students will research and discuss the historians of native history. In a group discussion the students will think critically about the historical control over written history. The students will write in their journals about their thoughts and feelings on the history of their people.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]:
- Introduction to Native American History (linear timeline)
Example: The students will use their school provided history books to present the minimal facts that are provided about native histories. They will be provided cues and tools from the instructor to work on deconstructing the racism and oppression in the text of their learning.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]: [vacation]

Week Four [TTH Blocks]:
-Dissect linear history
Example: The students will focus on movements such as the ghost dance movement and The American Indian Movement and others. In a group discussion the students will expand on the important weight of these histories to our people.

Materials: Library, Internet, Native Elders, and Journals
Evaluation: Can the students identify the racism structure of the current history book texts and classes in public high school education? Can the students identify where they have to fight for their self-determination and identity through the lost pages?

Instructor Strategies: Cue critical thinking questions to spark thought in the student’s minds about our histories being lost due to white history books. Prepare detailed information on Native History as a whole and more importantly Native History specific to the region of the students.

March

Theme: Native History (Histories of the Wabanaki tribes of Maine)
Learning Objectives: The students will study the History of the tribes of Maine.

Week one [MWF Blocks]:

- History of the Passamaquoddy Example: The students will use library, Internet resources and Elders to learn about the history of the Passamaquoddy. The students will share their information with the class in a group information sharing session. The students will watch a video about the Passamaquoddy. The students will journal about their learned experience during this exercise.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]:

- History of the Maliseet - Example: The students will use library, Internet resources and Elders to learn about the history of the Maliseet. The students will share their information with the class in a group information sharing session. The students will watch a video about the Maliseet. The students will journal about their learned experience during this exercise.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]:

History of the Micmac
Example: The students will use library, Internet resources and Elders to learn about the history of the Micmac. The students will share their information with the class in a group information sharing session. The students will watch a video about the Micmac. The students will journal about their learned experience during this exercise

Week Four [TTH Blocks]:

History of the Penobscot
Example: The students will use library, Internet resources and Elders to learn about the history of the Penobscot. The students will share their information with the class in a group information sharing session. The students will watch a video about the Penobscot. The students will journal about their learned experience during this exercise
Materials: Library, Internet, Native Elders, and Journals
Evaluation: Can the students identify the different tribes of Maine as well as give short stories as to whom the people are and how they are represented today?

Instructor Strategies: Cue critical thinking questions to spark thought in the student’s minds about our histories being lost due to white history books. Prepare detailed information on Native History as a whole and more importantly Native History specific to the region of the students.

April

Theme: Native Wars and Genocide
Learning Objectives: The students will learn about the deliberate and systematic destruction of our race as American Indians, otherwise known as Genocide. The students will learn about the results of these tragic events leading to the dehumanization of the victim groups of genocide. The students will be thinking critically about racism and oppression from the root of genocide trying to erase our race.

Week one [MWF Blocks]:

-Native American Genocide
Example: The students will research Genocide destruction and its intent to destroy our racial and spiritual existence.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]:

- Traditional Native education, boarding schools and modern day native education Example: The students will create a detailed timeline of the learning and education experience of the native people throughout history.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]: [vacation]

Week Four [TTH Blocks]:

-American Indian Wars Example: The students will research and learn about Manifest Destiny, Indian Removal from land and territory lost through treaties. As well as the white revolution and the many strong native leaders that were lost during this time.

Materials: Library, Internet, Native Elders, and Journals
Evaluation: Can the students articulate Genocide in the definition of the Native experience? Were the students able to create a timeline of the education/learning institution histories of native people? Are the students knowledgeable of the American Indian Wars and the Native leaders and freedom fighters that were lost during this time?
Instructor Strategies: Prepare detailed information to contribute to the discussion on genocide, native education and to the histories of AIW and Freedom Fighters.

May

Theme: Wars continued and AIM (American Indian Movement)
Learning Objectives: The students will learn about the Native American activist organization founded in 1968 in Minneapolis Minnesota by Native Americans called AIM the American Indian Movement. The AIM agenda focuses on saving and preserving native spirituality, leadership and sovereignty. The students will learn about significant freedom fighter, political prisoners and our modern day warriors.

Week one [MWF Blocks]:

- Wounded Knee and Trail of Tears Example: The students will research Wounded Knee; a site that was designated a National Historic Landmark. The students will report on the significance of this time and place in our history. The students will research the Trail of Tears; or the death march and relocation of Native people from the lands we always lived on.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]:

- Native American Leaders
Example: The students will research and report on Native American Leaders.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]:

- American Indian Movement Example: The students will research AIM’s many accomplishments in the decades since its founding. The students will report on how AIM has supported the American Indian survival.

Week Four [TTH Blocks]:

Native American Freedom Fighters, Political Prisoners, Modern Day Warriors

Example: The students will each be given a person from each category to research and give a short presentation to the class.

Materials: Library, Internet, Native Elders, and Journals
Evaluation: Can the students articulate their knowledge on the AIM movement? Were the students able to create detailed presentations of their research on Wounded Knee, Trail of Tears and History of our Warriors? Were the students knowledgeable of the similarities and differences of warriors, political prisoners and freedom fighters?
Instructor Strategies: Prepare detailed information on AIM. Prepare information on Native American Leaders. Prepare information on Wounded Knee and Trail of Tears. Prepare information on Political prisoners, freedom fighters and modern day warriors.

June

Theme: Native History (Traditional verse Non-Linear)
Learning Objectives:
The students will be thinking critically about racism and oppression as it is formed into learning institutions in which native students are educated.

Week one [MWF Blocks]:

-Dissect the histories the students were taught in their traditional history classes
Example: The students will read and have a discussion on “Lies My Teacher Told Me” (1995) James W. Loewen.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]:

-Continue analyzing and redirecting the linear history to a more tangible understanding of native experience

Week Three [MWF Blocks]:

- Library day; have the student’s research and write a short report on an event or person in Native history that inspires them.

Week Four [TTH Blocks]:

-Student’s Research Presentations

Materials: Library, Internet, Native Elders, Journals, Book: Lies My Teacher Told Me” (1995) James W. Loewen.
Evaluation: Can the students identify the racism structure of the current history book texts and classes in public high school education? Can the students identify where they have to fight for their self-determination and identity through the lost pages? Did the students show an understanding of the oppression they experience after their critical thinking on reading Lies My Teacher Told Me?

Instructor Strategies: Throughout this month invite elders to come share with the students an oral piece of history. This month’s focus on native education will culminate in the return of home grown learning where native elders educate native youth. This education will start a sense of togetherness and will intentionally bring spiritual energy into the students learning space. What this learning ritual will look like will depend on what the class makes together.

September

Theme: Public Speaking
Learning Objectives: The students will watch Public Speaking videos and learn Public speaking techniques. The students will practice their own politically based Public Speaking to the class. The students will learn the purpose and intention to public speaking; intending to inform and influence.

Week One [MWF Blocks]:

- Public Speaking Example: The students will watch/listen to Native American Public Speakers, and take notes in their Journals about how they feel influenced by them and critique the speakers.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]: - Writing a persuasive speech Example: The students will write their own politically based speech on a topic of their choice they are passionate about.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]:

-Practice Public speaking Example: The students will give their speech to the group; the instructor will record the students for the student’s possession and self-critique.

Week Four [TTH Blocks]:

-Continued Student’s speeches

Materials: Library, Internet, Native Elders, Public Speaking Videos, Journals, and Video Camera
Evaluation: Did the students work at their public speaking confidence and clarity? Were the students speeches informative or Influential? Did the students complete the public speaking assignment?
Instructor Strategies: Seek to empower the students with positive reinforcement of reminding them of the hard work and effort, be prepared to be a support network for the students that are love confidence or are shy. Be prepared to present your own speech as an instructor as an icebreaker for the students.

October

Theme: Community Education
Learning Objectives: This month through learning about Community Education the students will seek to interpret teachings, to free their minds of rules of mainstream academia and prepare themselves for transcending to an empowering education.

Week One [MWF Blocks]
- Education for Liberation Example: (what does this mean for Native American Students) The students will research and learn about community activists for Native Education, as well as youth and researchers working for education liberation. Students will learn about social justice teaching materials, as well as Conferences, non-profits and organizations that work to liberate education for people of colour.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]: - Building Leadership, Teamwork and Community Skills Example: The students will have a group discussion about these topics and then on their own write examples of each and how they would personally execute them in their own style.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]

- Leadership development project Example: The will students write about action and change. How they participate in it, or want to participate in it or where they see action and change going on in for other Natives they have researched.

Week Four [TTH Blocks]:

- Communication Example: The students will work on these skills of verbal and nonverbal communication; develop and analyze formal and informal presentations.

Materials: Library, Internet, Native Elders, and Journals
Evaluation: Can the student articulate their definition of their own liberated education? Does the student have and understanding of social justice and is able to provide an updated example? Did the student complete the leadership development project? Did the students work on their skills of non/verbal communication skills?
Instructor Strategies: Be prepared to be a support network, Empowerment is key. Prepare communication diagrams and strategies; practice your own communication skills as an instructor. Practice strong safe communication skills with the students.

November

Theme: (Student’s Personal Development)
Learning Objectives: Start preparing the student for life after High School. Empowerment!

Week One [MWF Blocks]

-Write down post graduation goals - Open up the Time Capsule from first year - Compare goals and talk about the changes that happened

Week Two [TTH Blocks]: - Resume writing Example: The student will research examples of job resumes and practice writing. The exercise should result in the student having completed a resume.

Week Three [Vacation]

Week Four [TTH Blocks]: Explore post high school lifestyles: work, additional education, journeying Example: Assist students in applying for jobs. Assist students in applying to schools. Assist students in mapping out a travel journey or alternative plan.

Materials: Internet, Newspapers, Job Applications, College Portfolios, college applications journey map
Evaluation: The student is showing self-determination.

Instructor Strategies: Be prepared to be a support network, Seek to Empower!

December

Theme: (Student’s Personal Development)
Learning Objectives: Start preparing the student for life after High School. Empowerment!

Week One [MWF Blocks] - Give students the tools and knowledge to use local resources such as the newspaper or Internet to search for jobs, housing and support services through community organizations for Natives.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]:

- Assist the students in starting a checking account and managing a checking account

Week Three [MWF Blocks] Continue assisting students with after school plans (job, school, journey)

Week Four [Vacation]

Materials: Internet, Newspapers, Job Applications, College Portfolios, college applications, journey map
Evaluation: The student is showing self-determination.
Instructor Strategies: Be prepared to be a support network, Seek to Empower!

January

Theme:

Week One [MWF Blocks]

-Students will be asked to demonstrate an understanding of personal success, what it means to them to be responsible using their personal values and principles. The students will be asked to journal about if/how their personal success fits into the picture of their tribe’s success, values and principles.

Week Two [TTH Blocks]:

The students will be asked to submit a writing piece that describes their transformative process, what they learned about themselves over the last four years on a personal and academic level. What the students feel they learned from high school and what they didn’t learn within the institution.

Week Three [MWF Blocks]

- The students will be asked to build a life model. How they are going to apply the things they have learned so far in life, to their life after graduation.

Week Four [TTH Blocks]:

- Personal Process time in preparation for their senior project proposals

Theme: (Last five months of school dedicated to teaching first year students with senior projects, the projects are of a native person or movement etc of the student’s choice to report on and teach the first year students in an oral and written hand out presentation.)

February

Week one [MWF Blocks]: Present Projects to First year students
Week two [TTH Blocks]: Fourth Year Presentations
Week Three [MWF Blocks]: February Vacation
Week Four [TTH Blocks]: class discussion of presentations with first year students (this is a time for first years to have a Q&A with fourth year.

March

Week one [MWF Blocks]: Fourth Year Presentations
Week Two [TTH Blocks]: Process, Reflect, and Discuss Presentations
Week Three [MWF Blocks]: Fourth Year Presentations
Week Four [TTH Blocks]: Process, Reflect, and Discuss Presentations

April

Week one [MWF Blocks]: Fourth Year Presentations
Week two [TTH Blocks]: Fourth Year Presentations
Week Three [MWF Blocks]: April Vacation
Week Four [TTH Blocks]: class discussion of presentations with first year students (this is a time for first years to have a Q&A with fourth year.

May

Week one [MWF Blocks]: Fourth Year Presentations
Week Two [TTH Blocks]: Process, Reflect, and Discuss Presentations
Week Three [MWF Blocks]: Fourth Year Presentations
Week Four [TTH Blocks]: Process, Reflect, and Discuss Presentations
June
Week one [MWF Blocks]: Participate in Native youth journey
Week Two [TTH Blocks]: Participate in Native youth rituals/practices.
Week Three [MWF Blocks]: Fourth Year Students Graduation Ceremonies

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