Free Essay

Compare and Contrast Fredrick Douglas and David Walker

In: Historical Events

Submitted By michy101
Words 3165
Pages 13
The essence of this paper requires a contrast and comparison view on two important historical articles; Fredrick Douglass “What to the slave is the fourth of July” and David Walker’s “Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World”. The essay will attempt to discuss the very famous speech Fredrick Douglas made in 1952 as well as David’s Walker’s appeal while comparing and contrasting both the appeal and the speech. Afterward, a summary will be given and a conclusion will be drawn.
As we look throughout history, one would argue that we couldn’t find a more appalling and unjust act as that of slavery. Slavery played a major role of not only history but of an innumerable amount of American people. In David Walker’s appeal and Fredrick Douglass what to the slave is the fourth of July, men and women of African American descent struggle with the reality of slavery and the cruel results and affect it had on people like themselves.
Fredrick Douglas was one of the most influential African Americans of his day, in spite of his inauspicious beginning, he was born into slavery on a plantation in Maryland where he was called Fredrick Augustus Washington Bailey. Douglas always suspected that his father was his mother’s white owner, Captain Aaron Anthony. He spent his early childhood in privation on the plantation then he was sent to work as a house slave for the auld family in Baltimore. There, he came in contact with printed literature and quickly realized the relationship between literacy and personal freedom. With help from Mrs. Auld, Douglas learned how to read and write. In 1833, the Aulds, sent him back to the plantation, where he soon acquired a reputation for the resistance and more submissive, Douglass owner sent him to Edward covey, a ‘slave breaker’ paid to discipline and train obedient slaves. Instead of cowing Douglas, the experience with covey only strengthened Douglas resolve to acquire his freedom. In 1838, at the age of 20, Douglas escaped to the north and settled Rochester, New York in 1847 and began to champion equality and freedom for slaves in earnest.
On July 5, 1852 approximately 3-5 million African Americans were enslaved – roughly 14% of the total population of the United States. That was the state of the nation when Fredrick Douglas was asked to deliver a keynote address at the Independence Day celebration. He accepted, on the day white Americans celebrated their independence and freedom from the oppression of the British crown. Douglas delivered his now famous speech what to the slave is the fourth of July. In it, Douglass offered the most though provoking and powerful testaments to hypocrisy, prejudice and inhumanity of slavery ever given.
Furthermore, David walker was born to a free mother and an enslaved father; he inherited his mother’s status as free. Walker witnessed the misery of slavery in his native state and during his travels in the south, including one episode where a son was forced to whip his mother until she died. He settled in Boston in the 1820’s where he established a secondhand clothing business and became the most noted abolitionist in Boston, associated with the abolitionist groups Prince Hall Freemasonry, Massachusetts General Colored Association and the newspaper, Freedom’s journal. In 1929, he published the first of three editions of his appeal in four articles; together with a preamble, to the colored citizens of the world, but in particular and very expressly to those of the United States of America. This fiery pamphlet violently and explicitly condemned whites for the institution of chattel slavery. Walker’s appeal, which called for slaves to rebel against their masters on the basis of reclaiming their humanity and on the principles of Christianity, resonated strongly with free and enslaved blacks throughout the country. Walker’s central theme was a call for the unity amongst slaves and the immediate need to rebel against their masters. In order to communicate his central theme, Walker boldly attacked the fundamental values of the United States society by revealing the hypocrisy of having the institution of chattel slavery.
In the decades preceding the Civil War, many free blacks spoke out passionately, opposing slavery through literature and spoken word. Two such works are "What to a Slave is the Fourth of July, a speech by Fredrick Douglass, and David Walker's Appeal by David Walker. Although written nearly twenty years apart, these two pieces contain many similar aspects. These aspects are seen in both their themes and phrasing. Douglas' and Walker's pieces can be most easily understood through the comparison of the outrages they both call attention to and their relationship to the hypocrisy of religion and government. This then contrasted with the audience they were intended for.
Therefore, some of the comparisons between Fredrick Douglass speech and David walker’s speech are as follows; Firstly, The Church had “made itself the earthwork of American slavery”, and the shield of American slave-hunters. Both Douglass and Walker held the church in great contempt for not only condoning slavery but essentially supporting it. In both pieces, many biblical references were made. Each document pointed out that the church had “shamelessly given the sanction of religion and the Bible to the whole slave system” and taught that man may, properly, be a slave; and that the relation of master and slave is ordained of God. Walker also accuses the church of leading people to believe “that heaven had designed blacks and their children to be slaves and beasts of burden to them and their children”. The two men shared a common view that in the eyes of God, slavery was an abomination. Another shared view was the hypocrisy of our governmental values which we as Americans hold so dearly.
Secondly, The American government was founded on the principles of freedom and the belief that every man has his own inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. The Declaration of Independence states that “All men are created equal.”  Both of Walker and Douglass were quick to look right through these empty statements and point out that in America all men are not “created equal”. "Compare your own language extracted from your Declaration of Independence, with your cruelties and murders inflicted by your cruel and unmerciful fathers and yourselves on our fathers and on us--men who have never given your fathers or you the least provocation!!!!”
Thirdly, Reading through both of these pieces the words tyranny and oppression come up many times. These were common feelings among abolitionists. Often in these pieces the authors make use of irony to say that this is taking place in "tyrant-killing, king-hating, people-loving, democratic, Christian America. This point is illustrated in Douglass rhetorical question, "Now, Americans! I ask you candidly, was your sufferings under Great Britain, one hundredth parts as cruel and tyrannical as you have rendered ours under you?”
Fourthly, both men are ex-slaves and abolitionists who believe that the act of slavery is seemingly normal towards cruelty of religious slaveholders. . Frederick speaks on his personal experiences in trying to teach his brethren to read the word of God:
“It was understood among all who came, that there must be as little display about it as possible. It was necessary to keep our religious masters at St. Michael’s unacquainted with the fact, that, instead of spending the Sabbath in wrestling, boxing, and drinking whiskey, we were trying to learn how to read the will of God; for they had much rather see us engaged in those degrading sports, than to see us behaving like intellectual, moral, and accountable beings.”

Furthermore, Walker uses a black nationalistic rhetoric to echo the ideas of liberty for all men which Jefferson calls "divine and natural law" while emphasizing the need for black unity as the only means to overcome slavery for these "chosen people of God". To achieve this unity, Walker established the need to overcome ignorance and the urgency in stopping black mental and physical subordination to the white man.
Douglass not only chastised white America for slavery, but he also urged that blacks come together and help themselves. He mentioned that the black people should not think that slavery is God's will, but that soon, God will one day deliver them from the hands of slavery. As Douglass says:

"We have no organization among ourselves," he lamented, but we are divided by jealousy into petty factions. The "ignorant colored clergy" were partly responsible "for the apathy of the colored people to their own cause" because they preached passive otherworldly social messages to the people, especially the "absurd notion to expect God to deliver us from bondage. We must elevate ourselves by our own efforts," Douglass challenged the blacks, because God helps those who help themselves.
In addition to the comparisons, there are but a few differences. The most apparent difference of these two pieces is in the audience for which they were intended. Both Walker and Douglas were religious men who took Christianity and the message of God to heart but they were also men who lived in a time when white Americans didn’t want them to read the word of God for themselves and punished them frequently for doing so, sometimes, for even being religious at all. The cruel times they lived in shaped their views on Christianity, their struggles to learn it and come to terms with its role in their lives, and how they applied it to African Americans as a people. Walker's appeal was directed to his “brethren”. It called for them to rise up and speak out much like he did. Copies of his book being found in the possession of slaves led to the tighter laws against teaching slaves to read and the distribution of such material in the many southern states. He attempted to inform the uninformed of what was happening to them and berated those who were “ignorantly in league with slaveholders or tyrants”. The slaveholders knew from experiences with other educated blacks such as Douglass and Walker that it would lead to an uprising.
On the other hand, Douglass' speech was given to remind his audience of liberty's unfinished business. His audience was much different than that of Walker's appeal. He spoke to the Rochester Ladies' Anti-Slavery Society at Rochester Hall. His speech was fiery to say the very least. At parts it was rather sarcastic in its criticism of the church and government. This speech was given in the decade leading up to the civil war and tensions were at all-time highs. Many of the things he said, Walker might not have for fear of retribution. Douglass' remarks were chiefly directed towards our forefathers and the ministers of our nation. Much of it would not have been taken too kindly to twenty years earlier when Walker’s document was written. He stated that the ministers were “stupidly blind” and that the fathers of our country had “stooped when writing the constitution” and was the veriest imposters that ever practiced on mankind.  Walker's audience was convinced a change was needed while Douglass' knew it was inevitable.
By looking at the similarities of the men's views of how slavery relates to religion and government as well as the differences of their intended audiences it is easier to understand these two works. These two pieces were instrumental in promotion of the liberty of slaves. They affected blacks as well as whites. In the decades leading up to the civil war, more and more controversy was brought about largely due to these two pieces. Not only were people’s feelings on slavery changing but so were they're views on African-Americans. To many, they were no longer “the most degraded, wretched, and abject set of beings that ever lived since the world began”. For the first time in the history of the United States, more than a handful of people started to see them as humans who ought to have the same inalienable rights that the Declaration of Independence spoke of nearly seventy-five years earlier.
Both men had issues with Christianity as it was practiced in America. Douglas went as far to say that there was a distinct difference between the “Christianity of this land” and the “Christianity of Christ”. Walker went further when he spoke on how those slain by the hand of God for their wickedness in Sodom and Gomorrah would come down upon the white Americans, Bibles in hand, and condemn them for the things they have done. Walker was also known for pointing out Scripture that calls for a man to be put to death for hurting or killing a Christian and applying this in comparison to all the violent crimes acted out against black slaves by white Americans for reading the Bible or practicing its teachings. Walker focused on how Christianity could point out the wrongs of the slave owners. He believed that white Americans secretly knew in their hearts that blacks were also men since God made man in his image and a man is a man despite his color. While Walker was pointing out scripture to white Americans to make his points, Frederick’s comment clearly shows that he felt that the two faiths shouldn’t even be seen the same. These separate views caused them both to approach Christianity differently despite many other similarities.
In addition, it is inevitable to feel the sense of desperation and quietness about the procedure and the importance in the hearts of these slaves. Douglas later notes, with great bitterness, that the meetings were eventually broken up and with great violence. These can be seen in examples, how Walker speaks to his readers with an imploring hope and that Frederick speaks with bitterness and with a sense of demanding action. This is likely a cause of their differences in how they view slavery, Christianity and oppression and its place in America since a view of using Christianity and the Bible as methods to argue with the whites lends to Walker a way to attempt to console black slaves and to implore white slave owners to reconsider their ways. On the contrary, Douglas’ views on Christianity as an abomination in this land and utterly separate from the way it is practiced among the black slaves, gives him the standpoint of fighting for freedom against the white Americans, as opposed to Walker’s method of working with them for a solution.
Both men, as ex-slaves and abolitionists, spoke out to their brethren about Christianity and its place in their lives. Walker does this by comparing the views of Mr. Clay and Bishop Allen. Mr. Clay believed that America should send the slaves back to Africa to spread Christianity there and that doing so would “cleanse” America of her acts of theft, murder and slavery which, as Mr. Clay puts it, “we had been the innocent cause of inflicting.” Walker compares this desire with the words of Bishop Allen who questions how uneducated freed black men are supposed to civilize or Christianize anyone in Africa when they have been denied instruction on how to accomplish this feat. Walker goes on at length in praising Bishop Allen and calling him a brother to all African Americans in his actions. Douglas, on the other hand, which Walker happens to agree with? He believed that they used their faith as justification for their actions and that this made them deplorable. Douglas spoke on the Christmas season and how, were it taken away from slaves that a slave uprising would immediately result. He believed that this season was important to religious slaves and nonreligious slaves alike in that it gave them time to get their affairs in order, religious or otherwise, as well as have time to relax from the never-ending duties of slave life. The importance of this holiday season, as stressed by Douglas, was an important aspect of slave life, and, as such, is evidence of the impact Christianity had for the slaves despite whether or not they were Christian themselves. He goes on to talk about Christianity as a beam of light that can educate a slave and bring him from his place of degradation to a place of dignity. Douglas writes, “I have found that, to make a contented slave, it is necessary to make a thoughtless one. It is necessary to darken his moral and mental vision, and, as far as possible, to, annihilate the power of reason. He must be able to detect no inconsistencies in slavery; he must be made to feel that slavery is right; and he can be brought to that only when he ceases to be a man.”
To summarize, the important notion of David walker’s appeal and Fredrick Douglass speech can be said to be the most powerful yet provoking testaments. Written and expressed in the 19th century. In his APPEAL, Walker tells "colored citizens" to ever make an attempt to gain freedom or natural right, from under our cruel oppressors and murderers, until you see your ways clear; when that hour arrives and you move, be not afraid or dismayed." (17) The Biblical injunction "be not afraid or dismayed" is from 2 Chronicles 20.15, where the Israelites are told God would save them. The Israelites are expected to pray, "But Walker asserts that the Negro must 'move.' ... they must and implicit in Walker's language is the assumption that they will take action and move to claim what is rightfully and morally theirs." White Americans committed the sin of willfully turning "colored people of these United States" into "the most degraded, wretched, and abject set of beings that ever lived since the world began. Douglas on the other hand, Douglass’s oration shows how white slaveholders perpetuate slavery by keeping their slaves ignorant. At the time Douglass was writing, many people believed that slavery was a natural state of being. They believed that blacks were inherently incapable of participating in civil society and thus should be kept as workers for whites. The Narrative explains the strategies and procedures by which whites gain and keep power over blacks from their birth onward. Slave owners keep slaves ignorant of basic facts about themselves, such as their birth date or their paternity. This enforced ignorance robs children of their natural sense of individual identity.
In conclusion, it can be said that both Douglass and walker though ex slaves and abolitionists and years apart managed to speak to different audiences but their inspiring stories and their strong and powerful orations on slavery, oppression, Christianity as well as what at their time period made slavery so ignorantly wrong. Both The speech and the appeal endure as one of the most articulate expressions of what it means to be excluded from the republican experiment that resulted in the democracy of the United States. Yet, beyond a condemnation of slavery, the speech endures because Douglass adopted a hopeful tone, believing that the United States would be more complete once slavery ended.…...

Similar Documents

Free Essay

Compare and Contrast David

...Gian Lorenzo Bernini and Michelangelo Buonarroti : Compare and Contrast David This paper will focus on Bernini’s and Michelangelo’s work of art called David. The works of both artists are incredible, beautiful, and breathtaking. The works have interpretations of mythologies and Old Testament stories that originated millenniums ago. Both artists had the ability to produce such rich and poignant emotional content; their works are still able to invoke a deeply affecting response in viewers today. Michelangelo was born on March 6, 1475, at Caprese, in Tuscany (Michelangelo). He was the second of five brothers. Michelangelo lost his mother at the early age of 6. After his mothers passing Michelangelo had a neglected childhood. Throughout his childhood he managed to remain quiet and keep to himself. However, the boy was very intelligent and his father recognized this and sent him off to school (Michelangelo). Michelangelo is known as one of the greatest artists of all time. Gian Lorenzo Bernini was born on November 7, 1598 in Naples and thrived as a Baroque sculptor from the approximate age of eight until his death in 1680. The Baroque style Bernini encompassed was an artistic movement inspired by the Catholic Church after the Counter-Reformation. Baroque sculptures provide a range of viewpoints. Bernini’s Borghese works were similar to performances rather than a sculpture frozen in time (Bernini’s Borghese Sculptures: Another View). His influences included Renaissance......

Words: 2030 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Reaction to David Walkers Appeal

...AAAS 316-001 Professor Rahman | Reaction To: | David Walker, 1785-1830Walker's Appeal, in Four Articles; Together with a Preamble, to the Coloured Citizens of the World, but in Particular, and Very Expressly, to Those of the United States of America, Written in Boston, State of Massachusetts, September 28, 1829 | | Eric Kipp | 5/28/2013 | | | David Walker’s Appeal for me was a lesson in history, prophecy, human rights doctrine and religious argument all wrapped up into one “Pamphlet.” He begins with a “Preamble” and divides the “Pamphlet” into four “Articles” or arguments. The “Articles” titled “Slavery,” “Ignorance,” “The Preachers of the Religion of Jesus Christ” and “The Colonizing Plan” respectively all carries the same common theme amongst them: Slavery is wrong, inhumane and must be abolished. After reading this over several times, it was amazing to me that this was written in the early 1800’s in the United States of America. T he reason I say that is because most of what Walker spoke about were the same issues that were written and spoke about during the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950’s and 60’s. I suffice to say that there is a lot in this “Pamphlet” that is still very pertinent to our society today. There are so many different reactions that I have to pieces pertaining to slavery in America. This is a very difficult assignment to just hash this down to a single reaction or response from my perspective. It is so amazing to me to......

Words: 1384 - Pages: 6

Free Essay

Compare and Contrast

...Compare and Contrast Paper It has long been said that the redneck sport of the United States is the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing more formerly known as NASCAR. Some people may not know about the other auto racing series that occasionally comes to the United States to compete. That series is known as Formula 1. NASCAR and Formula 1 have stark differences in where they race, how they race. Did you know that both series average speed is faster than the speed needed for a Boeing 747? A Boeing 747 requires between 150 to 200 miles per hour to take off. Right off the bat, the differences start. One of the biggest differences is the locations that these two series race. NASCAR primary races in the United States but does occasionally race in Mexico and Canada, although they did not during this past year’s season. NASCAR races in 23 cities around the country hitting many of them twice a season (2013 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series TV Broadcast Schedule). Formula 1 currently races in 19 different countries, spanning four continents and hitting each track only once during the season. NASCAR has an average of 36 races a season, while Formula 1 currently has 20 races a season. The next comparison is the vehicles that are used to provide all of the entertainment value that we see on television on a weekly basis. NASCAR drivers race in a closed wheel, closed driver compartment car. Due to NASCAR’s ongoing commitment to safety and entertainment NASCAR recently developed a......

Words: 645 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Fredrick Douglas

...14-5 Frederick Douglass, Independence Day Speech (1852) The most important African American leader of his time, Fredrick Douglass had a profound impact on American notions of slavery. Born in slavery, Douglass escaped at the age of 20 and began writing and speaking against slavery. His volumes of autobiography including “Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglass, an American Slave” (1845) were among the greatest of the slave narratives and are now considered classic examples of American autobiography. As a speaker, newspaper editor and writer, Douglass’ influence was great. He knew and aided John Brown in his efforts, welcomed the Civil War and until his death in 1895, spoke against Jim Crow laws and lynching. This famous speech is a masterful example of Douglass’ use of irony in illuminating the hypocrisy of the celebration of Independence day. Fellow citizens above your national, tumultuous joy, I hear the mournful wail of millions! whose chains, heave and grievous yesterday, are, today, rendered more intolerable by the jubilee shouts that reach them. If I do forget, it I do not faithfully remember those bleeding children of sorrow this day, “may my right hand forger her cunning, and may ny tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth”! To forget them, to pass lightly over their wrongs, and to chime in with the popular theme would be treason most scandalous and shocking, and would make me a reproach before God and the world. My subject, them, fellow citizens, is......

Words: 1612 - Pages: 7

Free Essay

Compare and Contrast

...Tuesday/Thursday 10:30-11:45 Compare and Contrast The two pieces of art I've chosen to compare, contrast, and analyze are Woman at the Height of her Beauty, by Kitagawa Utamaro and Mother and Child, by Mary Cassatt. Both pieces are reflective of different societies of the time period in which they were created, and both pieces have a background and deeper meaning that goes beyond what meets the viewers eye. However, the aesthetic appeal varies greatly between the two pieces, as do the ideas they correspond to. Woman at the Height of her Beauty, which was made out of color woodblock print, depicts an Asian woman. The artist used linear movements and minimal decoration to create the woman's form, and in doing so created a simplified yet elegant depiction. Though she is portrayed simply and plainly, her hair pieces and clothing are more elaborate, which draws the viewer's eye to her clothes and accessories rather than the woman. This technique of using vague individual features allows the artist to portray women as a group, rather than an individual woman. The woman's facial expression and the position of her body, namely her hands, which she appears to be stretching, give the impression that she is preparing to do tedious and important tasks. If one were to compare these aspects with the title of the piece, one could come to the conclusion that the artist sees women who work hard and are the most successful to be of the most beauty. This reflects the societal views of......

Words: 751 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

Compare and Contrast

...Comparison and Contrast essay about gender. Most children grow up and develop their own personalities. In this essay, I will indicate the similarities and differences I have found within two toddlers and their characteristics. Taylor a 3-year-old girl and Savien a 2-year-old boy about to turn three. Savien and Taylor are wonderful kids that love to play all the time. Taylor is a quiet, shy, active, happy, organize, and an attentive type of child. She likes to observe people before she plays or talks to them. She likes to sit in the corner while watching TV and she doesn’t speak much. If you don’t ask her if she is hungry she won’t tell you because she is a very introverted child. Furthermore, she likes dolls, and she plays with them carefully. She also likes to play cars with Savien but she always put them back where they belong after she plays with them, unlike Savien. She is a very active child but likes to play quietly unlike Savien who plays loudly. Taylor is a happy child and a good friend of Savien. Savien is a very destructive, aggressive, active, nosy, happy, messy, and talkative child. He plays with his toys recklessly. Every time he plays with his toys they get damaged or lost. He doesn’t care about them but he likes to play with them. He is a very messy child that plays and leaves his toys everywhere. He likes to play in a more aggressive manner than Taylor, punching and fighting more so. He at times plays rough with Taylor and does not understand that he......

Words: 425 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

David Walker

...David Walker's Appeal opens with an impassioned examination of the Black condition in America driving slow and painstakingly towards a radical crescendo at the close of the fourth article. Upon first glance, the Appeal seems to exhibit one the earliest written examples of the classical Negro sermon invoking the tools of emotional petition, scriptural analogy and historical scrutiny in outlining the core narrative. Through further revisions to the text, Walker was able to expand upon the original thesis to form the ideological framework of Black liberation theology, social theory and nationalist discourse with consideration towards both freedmen and enslaved Blacks. The Preamble of Walker's Appeal provides an intriguing context for the rise and influence of Black liberation theology where the theological construct exists as the last bastion of "free" intellectual inquiry available to those held in slavery. Walker mines the potentiality of biblical scripture in order to establish his case for the abolition of slavery through moral suasion, Pan-African struggle and armed resistance when necessary. For sewing these seeds of discord, Walker would find himself revered amongst enslaved Blacks and radical abolitionists, reviled amongst whites and slaveowners, held afar by moderate whites and Blacks alike who considered his approach too extreme and later murdered near his shop only a year from the publication of the manuscript. Walker divided his appeal into four distinct areas......

Words: 547 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Compare and Contrast

...Strategies for Persuasion Using Compare and Contrast The two essays that I’ve chosen were “I Want a Wife” by Judy Brady” and my other one was “Sister Flowers” by Maya Angelou. I’ve reread the both of these essays twice just to get the feel of these two essays. In the essay of “I Want a Wife” I looked for the key elements that the Authors had used in this essay. In that essay the author’s purpose was that to show women of how the males treat females in a wrong manner. This is something that maybe all women had been gone through some point in time in their lives, but this is going on in today’s world, it is a relatable subject. It is quoted by Judy Brady that she said in her essay that she wanted all females to think in her message (“those women were being underappreciated, and that she is fed up with it)”. When telling this essay the sound of her tone was I would think that she was angry, but hearing how she had write this essay it seems as if she was calm. My other essay “Sister Flowers” is totally different different from my other essay. In this essay Maya Angelou is an American author, a poet with a remarkable voice telling her stories. When you listen to Maya Angelou tell a story, it almost feels like you’re right there with her, this is a good description essay, and a narrative essay. The purpose of this essay is of revelation; it is quoted that to (reveal the catalyst of her own literary experience, a muse who is a social and racial template for goodness). In the both...

Words: 377 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Fredrick Douglas

...of knowledge and people should acknowledge that. Frederick Douglas describes his struggle and desire to read and write as a slave, which his primary source of freedom, independence, and knowledge, in Learning to Read and Write. Frederick Douglas was aware that he was not only a slave in reality but also a slave in the mind.He had the disadvantage of being forbidden to learn.Frederick Douglass wanted to learn how to read and write in order to be free not only from slavery but from the enslavement of lacking knowledge. He referred to this lack of knowledge as darkness in the his text. He was so eager to learn how to read and write that he would try to make friends with white boys, which during that time it would of been thought to be impossible. His new friends quickly transformed into his teachers, meeting him at different times to teach him the essentials to learn how to read and write. Fredrick Douglas had this desire to read and write because he knew that they were the keys to his freedom and independence and knowledge. Those who opposed his efforts in reading and writing were slaveowners or anti-abolitionists. Anti-abolitionist had this belief, that if slaves were excluded from learning they would except their lives as slaves and would be less likely to aspire to free. Taking their ability to learn would make slaves vulnerable, dependent, and forced to believe that they can never have a voice of their own. Fredrick Douglass had confidence that the basic skills of reading......

Words: 495 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Compare and Contrast

...Compare and Contrast His/110CA-U.S. History to 1865 02/11/2014 Charles Slater Compare and Contrast In 1607, 104 men survived a journey which would bring them to the American coast. They sailed into the Chesapeake Bay and up a river which they would later name the James. ("America History", 2007). There where many things that were revealed that caused the failure of some colonies and the success of others. From disease to greed and all the other ups and downs that molded America today. Major differences between the British colonies and the French colonies where the greed and the way the two colonies performed actions that made them fruitful in all the endeavors they were making their goals. Take for intense when the British first came over their goals weren’t clearly set out and endorsed by companies that did not well equip the people they sent over very well, which made it so colonist were very unprepared and met catastrophe. The goals that the British companies had set where small colonies, based for trade and they wanted fur and other agricultural items. The British had little to no regard for the Indians land and saw it as property that could be bought and sold, The British also believed that the land was their God given right and it was their job to use the land. They did trade with the Indians but didn’t see the major uses for the local understanding. The French on the other had came over and set a major problem for the British. The French colonist...

Words: 431 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Fredrick Douglas

...Jason Dean Dr. Thomas Lyons English 3360 September 1, 2011 Fredrick Douglass Journal In his autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglass, an American Slave, Douglass invites his audience to view slavery from the inside out. The obvious irony is that the vast majority of his audience, initially, was of the same race as the villains depicted inside his book. Douglass used his experiences both as a spectator and participant in slavery to highlight and challenge the hypocrisies in society he found that were born, bred and sanctioned by the institution of slavery; one in particular was the interpretation and uses of Christianity by slave owners as means of empowering slavery instead of empowering the slaves. From the implied validation of slavery via the Curse of Ham to the deplorable acts inflicted on slaves by men viewed reverently as men of God within their communities, Christianity, a religion embedded with the teaching on the tentacles of peace, miracles and love served largely as a banner of confusion to a group of people whose need of those tentacles stood second to none. The curse of Ham is a biblical reference to the Book of Genesis 9:20-27 where the story is told of Ham having a curse placed upon his son after Ham’s father Noah, after Ham saw his father nude. Black Africans were viewed by many as descendants of Ham, which in the minds of some white Christians at the time validated slavery. Douglass disarms the Ham argument early in the book when...

Words: 551 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Compare and Contrast

...Amanda Church Compare and contrast draft Professor Elizabeth Parks English 121 May 19, 2014 I. Introduction- The Narrative, “This Old House: The Heart is a Lonely Menagerie” leaves more to the readers imagination than the Descriptive essay, “Once More to the Lake”. II. First Difference: Specific word usage and paragraphs A. The narrative has dialogue and uses action to get the reader’s attention. The paragraphs can be short even one word, depending on if the writer is showing a conversation between two or more people. For example in the Narrative, “This Old House: The Heart is a Lonely Menagerie”, David has multiple conversations with people throughout the essay giving you an idea of what is actually taking place and helping to put you into the situation. B. Descriptive essays normally have longer paragraphs which include a lot of detail. These types of essays also require carefully chosen words so that the reader can visualize what the writer is intending to say. For example in “Once More to the Lake” He makes it a point to tell you every detail you could possibly imagine about the lake. III. Second Difference: The Structure of the essay A. A narrative should have a plot, setting and characters. It should also cover all important events. In the Narrative the plot is about how David wants the little things in life to be of importance and not have to worry about all the hub bub of showing off your belongings. He wants to relax and lead a simple......

Words: 1090 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Compare and Contrast

...Compare and Contrast ENGL 102-C04: Composition and Literature Spring C 2015 APA Thesis Statement and Outline “The Most Dangerous Game” and “The Child by Tiger” are two short stories that are different in some ways as well as they have some aspects in common, both characters portray good and evil personalities. The twists in these stories will make one’s imagination run wild and they have the ability to entertain the mind. I. Introduction: The Most Dangerous Game and The Child by Tiger both character had a portrayed good and evil. II. The Most Dangerous Game short story by Richard Connell A. Major plot was to hunt human. B. To outsmart everyone he hunted. C. Thought he could control his destiny. III. The Child by Tiger short story by Thomas Wolfe A. Major plot no one is perfect B. How one can be easily misled by not knowing God for yourself? C. See both sides of good and evil. IV. Exodus 20:13, “Thou shalt not kill”. V. Conclusion Introduction “The Most Dangerous Game” by Richard Connell and “The Child by Tiger” by Thomas Wolfe were meant for two different audiences, the saved and sinner. By the end of both stories one will quickly realize that both characters had killer instincts. Both stories fall in a fiction novel category.......

Words: 1312 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Compare and Contrast

...John Nicolet June 5, 2015 Compare and Contrast 1. Compare and contrast the Magna Carta to the U.S. Constitution. A.The 6th amendment of the Constitution reads "In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjpy the right to be confronted with the witness against him." Also it was in the Magna Carta that "No freeman shall be taken or imprsioned or exiled or in any waydestroyrd except by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land. B. In Paragraph 29 of the Magna Carta it reads as follows, "No freeman is to be taken or imprisoned or disseised of his free tenement or of his liberties or free customs, or outlawed or exiled or in any way ruined, nor will we go against such a man or send against him save by lawful judgement of his peers or by the law of the land. To no-one will we sell or deny of delay right or justice. It reads the same in Amendment 6 that " In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial..wherein the crime shall have been committed." 2. Compare and contrast the English bill of rights of 1689 and the U.S. Constitution. A.The Bill creates separation of powers, limits the powers of the king and queen, enhances the democratic election and bolsters freedom of speech as well in the Constitution it talks about the seperation of power of each branch of the government. For example in Article 3 Section 2 talks about the Judical branches power and powers that the Supreme......

Words: 701 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

Compare and Contrast

...Compare and Contrast Calla Erickson HUM\176 12-16-11 Lavon Axia College The breaking news that I found on all three web sites were, the Penn State scandal Although this story disgusts me, it is the only one I could find on all three web sites. After reviewing this information I have found that the stories on Msnbc.com and Foxnews. com are very similar. Cnn.com has a slightly different approach to “spreading the word” I also noticed that with Cnn the story is a little different than on Msnbc and Fox. It seems like Cnn might have heard different information than Msnbc and Fox as it is stated differently on all web sites. Cnn seems like a very good web site to go to if you want good reliable information. I appreciate how they tell the story how it is, and they do not seem to be biased with their information. I also like how they tell the whole story instead of jumping into the middle of what has allegedly happened. I like how Cnn uses their approach to the breaking news stories, they do not seem like they are taking sides with anyone although im sure no one would be taking sides with the person in question. Msnbc seems to tell the story well too. I think they tried to get the story out sooner rather than taking their time to make sure they have all of the information they need. I like how Msnbc does not seem bias. They tell the information the way it is supposed to be told, by not......

Words: 443 - Pages: 2