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Child Labour

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Submitted By japjiv1992
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Bhuwan Ribhu, National Secretary of BBA said that “After exposure of GAP “Indian 'slave' children found making low-cost clothes destined for Gap” October 28, 2007, The Observer” still children were found working in the same area in zari industry this incident should not remain a media hype but now it is important to take action. These children were trafficked and were literally sold by middle man. GAP has shown the intent by international company should work against child labour and it is heartening to see that the Indian law enforcement is following suit. Such incidents show that holistic perspective is required in eliminating child labour form co-operations, civil society the government and law enforcement. We firmly believe that co-operates and the business houses should continue to work with India and cancellation of the orders is not a solution. Instead of cancelling the order the Business Houses should make sure that where ever their production is going on the manufacturing units shouldn’t employ children and also regularly monitor their contractors and sub-contractors to assure that they are not violating any labour law”.
Slave Kids Driving Economic Growth
“10-year-old unpaid workers who help clothing giants make billions.” “GAP slave kids is a gloomy reality of Indian Growing economy.” “Indian 'slave' children found making low-cost clothes destined for Gap” October 28, 2007, The Observer. These are some of the news headlines flashing across the world today. It is disheartening to just imagine that an embroidered top that you are buying for your child is made by another 10-year-old who whose life was trade into slavery for a mere Rs. 1000 ($ 25).
Western Brands and Designers have been looking for cheap labour in India but in the profit oriented business they forget to monitor that in glimmering, the future of thousands of children is diminishing. The question is now do we want this to continue?
Welcoming the move by GAP Inc. whose sweatshops in New Delhi was cited as involving child labour and their subsequent efforts to withdraw all products made by child labourers, Kailash Satyarthi, Chairperson, Global March Against Child Labour said, “We are glad that after so many years the situation has changed a little as the international brand like GAP have admitted that there is child labour involved in their supply chain, and we also appreciate their immediate response to this situation. But, we now need a stronger step towards this issue and initiate a monitoring network like Rugmark that ensures that the products are free from child labour.”
Bachpan Bachao Andolan- BBA (Save The Childhood Movement) has been targeting the embroidery industry for the 5 years, since its first raid in the sector on 3 September 2003 in Okhla, New Delhi from where 7 enslaved children were rescued and then rehabilitated. Prof. R. S. Chaurasia, Chairperson of BBA recalling that raid said. “It was one of the most difficult raid that we conducted in 2003, it was most dangerous one as no one was ready to believe that children were involved in zari industry. The lack of political will toward elimination of child labour is demoralizing for all the NGO’s and Civil Society who are working against child labour. He said that we have made complaints to various SDMs and labour minister to conduct raids in North West Delhi and South Delhi to conduct raids but our complaints are now just piece of paper for the officials. According to our investigations more than 1000 bonded child labourers would be rescued from these areas.” In support of his above statement he coded one incident that they made complaint to conduct a raid to the SDM, South Delhi on 10th July 2007 but till date they haven’t got permission to do so.
There are about 1 lakh child labourers in embroidery and zari sweatshops in Delhi and nearly the same numbers in Mumbai and elsewhere. Rough estimates show that there might be 5000-7000 embroidery units functioning in Delhi, with each unit employing around 25-30 children. Most of the children working in embroidery and zari workshops are trafficked from Bihar, Jharkhand and West Bengal. The children, who had been rescued through our raid and rescue operations, reported that they got as little as Rs. 20-30 a month and worked for more than 12-14 hours in small crowded rooms with poor lighting and ventilation. As a result many had eye problems/infections and skin allergies.
One of the solutions for this must be in partnerships and collaborations in evolving innovative mechanisms of ethical trade including monitoring and labelling of products. Corporations for long have been involved in the business of Corporate Social Responsibility by building schools, clinics, organising health camps, etc. While this kind of approach have been effective in providing services to the disadvantaged communities, the need of the hour is for the businesses to get their supply and manufacturing chains in order, moving beyond mere philanthropy to ethical trading practices. The consumers of the 21st century is more evolved and knowledgeable and needs to know that the product does not involve tiny hands, is not made from slaughtering a child’s future, by a child tattooed like a cow, so that his master can recognise him in the flock.
Time is long gone for the government to choose to deny the existence of child labour, trafficked and bonded labour in the country. Instead of becoming defensive about trade tariffs and sanctions, the concerned departments should act to active the law enforcement machinery and enforce the Bonded Labour Act, Child Labour Act, cooperate with NGOs and trade unions promoting victims’ assistance.
We are making a humble request to intervene in the matter of 75 bonded child labourers rescued yesterday from Zari units of Khanpur, New Delhi. The children were made to go through mental agony and harassment due to the insensitivity and bureaucracy from 12 noon to 10 pm. After rescue made by Labour Department and Police on request of Bachpan Bachao Andolan all the children were brought to police station. The statements of all the children were recorded by Police and officers of Labour Department and thereafter they were produced before the SDM, Hauz Khas area at 7 pm. After lot of queries these children were allowed to go to Mukti Ashram at about 10 pm in the night.
According to the order of the Sub Divisional Magistrate, these children are to be produced before him for further enquiry and investigation. It is 4 pm and no arrangement has been made to take them to his office by the Labour Department as directed by him. In ordinary course it will take about 1½ hours to reach from Mukti Ashram, which is located at a distance of about 45 kilometers from his office. It is sheer harassment and mockery of child rights on part of the SDM towards the rescued bonded children.
It is requested that SDM may be directed to record the statements of all the rescued children in Mukti Ashram during day time as soon as possible and to act as per provisions of Bonded Labour Abolition Act 1976.
It is also requested that the officials of Labour Department also be directed to act according to child labour law as well as concerned Police station be asked to identify and arrest the employers violating different provisions of law.

Politicians Must Drive 'Decent Work' in India's Garment Industry

India's garment sector risks lasting damage unless the government takes a clear lead in efforts to root out child slavery in the industry, the General Secretary of the International Textile, Garment and Leather Workers' Federation, the global union for textiles and clothing, Neil Kearney warned today.

Speaking on France's TV Channel 24, Mr. Kearney said it was extremely disappointing that when nearly all the players involved were actively working to solve the problems thrown up by the discovery of trafficked children in India's garments supply chain, some politicians were in denial mode - flailing around for scapegoats rather than joining in efforts to clean up the industry.

Said Mr. Kearney, "It is nonsense to talk about external sabotage and retaliatory measures against trading partners in the same week that police raids are resulting in the rescue of trafficked slave children and the courts are publicly deeming these as "bonded labour". Such talk appears out of touch with reality and further endangers the industry's reputation at a time when it desperately needs to show that it recognises the seriousness of the issue and is determined to tackle it head-on!

"Nobody wants to see India losing these orders and the jobs that go with them. Trade unions and others have pressed Gap Inc., the buyer involved, to stay with the offending supplier and jointly work to bring them into full compliance with Indian law and international labour standards. We are confident that they will do so and we welcome their commitment to work with the Indian authorities to support the rehabilitation of the children involved, getting them back into school while enabling their families to replace any lost income. Hopefully, in similar situations, all other buyers will make the same efforts and follow the same lead.

"Politicians must join this effort, indicate support for eliminating child labour by creating good quality education for all children and putting in place an efficient and effective labour and factory inspectorate to oversee workplace conditions. This would provide a major boost to the industry's international competitiveness by sending a clear message that India means business and is determined to grow its textile and garments exports on the back of decent work", concluded Mr. Kearney. - ends-

The International Textile, Garment and Leather Workers’ Federation is a global union federation bringing together 220 affiliated organisations in 110 countries with a combined membership of 10 million workers. For more information, contact: Neil Kearney (General Secretary) at 32/475932487 (mobile) or nkearney@itglwf.org ITGLWF Secretariat at tel: 32/02/511.26.06, fax: 32/02/511.09.04 or office@itglwf.org Visit our website at www.itglwf.org
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National Consumers League Press Release
For Release: October 30, 2007
Contact: Heather Horiuchi, heatherh@nclnet.org, 202-835-3323 or Carol McKay, carolm@nclnet.org, 724-799-5392
CONSUMER WATCHDOG GROUP COMMENDS RETAIL GIANT FOR PULLING PRODUCTS TAINTED BY CHILD LABOR, BUT CRITICIZES ‘GAP’ IN AUDITING SYSTEM
Washington, DC, October 30, 2007 -- Just weeks away from the beginning of the busy holiday shopping season, a major American retail clothing company, Gap Inc. has been found to have within its supply chain a vendor that was recently revealed to have utilized child slave labor in the course of production. The National Consumers League, the convener and co-chairing organization of the national Child Labor Coalition, issued the following statement in reaction to news that Gap Inc. has dropped a line of products that were discovered to have been made in sweatshop conditions by bonded child laborers – a form of slavery - in New Delhi. Children as young as 10 said they worked 16 hours a day for no pay, and the original report, which appeared in the British Observer newspaper as a result of that paper’s own investigation, described the factory as a “derelict industrial unit … smeared in filth, the corridors flowing with excrement from a flooded toilet.”
“This incident of child labor abuse underscores how important it is that companies vigilantly monitor their total supply chain – from company-owned manufacturing facilities, to contractors, to subcontractors,” said Darlene Adkins, Vice President for Public Policy at NCL and coordinator of the CLC. “This is especially critical when you are doing business in a part of the world where there's high incidence of child labor and bonded labor. NGOs believe the number of child laborers in India to be at 55 million and there are approximately ten million child bonded laborers. NCL calls upon companies contracting overseas to be vigilant in their oversight of labor conditions and encourages them to use third-party, independent monitoring.”
“The National Consumers League commends Gap Inc. for its response to reports revealing bonded child labor in the manufacturing of one of its product lines. It is imperative for a company with Gap’s clout and size to act as it did, destroying the tainted products in question, rather than allowing them to make their way to store shelves. It’s the expected moral path, but it’s also the legal one,” said Adkins. “According to federal law, the importation into the US of products made overseas by forced child labor is illegal.”
“What happens next is crucial, both for the children affected by these practices, and for Gap’s public relations crisis. There must be an appropriate response regarding the welfare of the children involved,” said Sally Greenberg, NCL Executive Director. “These young children must be immediately compensated for their work, despite the illegality of their employment, restored to their families, and a process of rehabilitation for these youngsters must begin. It is the responsibility of Gap, Inc. to work to prevent this from happening again and NCL urges them to work with credible, local nongovernmental organizations and trade unions.”
“When consumers learn that abuse of children is involved in the making of a product, they will steer clear of that product,” said Greenberg. “This should serve as a wakeup call for companies who are doing business overseas. American companies contracting with offshore vendors to manufacture their products are not beyond the watchful eyes of American consumers. These companies are responsible for what happens in their supply chain – whether its sweatshop or forced labor or product safety - and consumers will hold them accountable. Clearly, there were gaps in this retailer’s auditing system, and children are paying the price.”
About National Consumers League and Child Labor Coalition
The National Consumers League, founded in 1899, is America's pioneer consumer organization. Our mission is to protect and promote social and economic justice for consumers and workers in the United States and abroad. NCL convenes the Child Labor Coalition, a group of more than 30 organizations, representing consumers, labor unions, educators, human rights and labor rights groups, child advocacy groups, and religious and women’s groups. It was established in 1989, and is co-chaired by the National Consumers League and the American Federation of Teachers. Its mission is to protect working youth and to promote legislation, programs, and initiatives to end child labor exploitation in the United States and abroad. NTERNATIONAL TEXTILE, GARMENT AND LEATHER WORKERS’ FEDERATION29th October 2007
Time to Scratch beneath the Surface to Root out Child SlaveryGap Inc. took a global hammering at the start of the week as news emerged of child slavery in their Indian supply chain. But scores of other brands and garment retailers qualify for the same headlines by permitting sub-contracting in their sourcing in India and as many as twenty-five other countries, the global union representing garment workers claimed today.Neil Kearney, General Secretary of the International Textile, Garment and Leather Workers’ Federation (ITGLWF) said, “Whether sourcing in Delhi, Istanbul, Jakarta or a host of other low-cost locations, brands and retailers permitting uncontrolled sub-contracting are likely to be no better than Gap and probably much worse. At least Gap placed a contractual obligation on suppliers to abide by a set of labour standards including a ban on child labour in their own premises and in those of their sub-contractors. Many others don’t even properly control their direct suppliers let alone think about sub-contractors. “While many of the leading brands and retailers have adopted codes of conduct aimed at ensuring basic workers rights in their supply chains, these are usually only applied at direct supplier level and rarely at the myriad of sub-contractors and sub-sub-contractors which play an increasingly important role in the supply chain“Thus the very worst workplaces escape oversight or control allowing gross exploitation, including the use of trafficked children, to reign.“It is time for a general spring-clean of the global garment industry. Every brand and retailer should be working overtime this weekend mapping their supply chains and including every supplier and every sub-contractor followed by an urgent review of working conditions in every workplace in the chain. Nobody wants these jobs to leave India, Pakistan or Indonesia but workplaces not complying with national labour law and international labour standards must be forced to do so immediately or be dropped in favour of those providing decent work.“This must be a wake-up call for all brands and retailers. They must begin to use only a dedicated group of compliant suppliers with sub-contracting being permitted only in exceptional situations and only after the approval of the brand or retailer placing the order.“And while putting the brands and retailers on the spot let’s not overlook the responsibility of governments to enact and enforce legislation protecting workers’ rights generally and especially shielding children from the cruelty of exploitation.“Only a few days ago one Indian government minister was railing against trade unions and NGOs accusing them of damaging India by whistle-blowing on child labour and other workers’ rights abuses. He and his colleagues would be better placed listening to trade unions and others demanding action rather than attacking them.“The abuse of children in workplaces across India is a disgrace. Urgent action by the government is needed at the educational and labour levels. India must begin to provide access to good quality education for all children and it must develop a labour and factory inspectorate capable of eradicating child labour in every workplace.“While the government sits on its hands the Indian garment supply chain will continue to constitute a serious hazard to those who source from it”, concluded Mr. Kearney. | | | | | | | | | | | | |
On its Silver Jubilee celebrations on the 10th Nov 2006, The Delhi Legal Services Authority stood up for the cause of children, literally. For the first time in its history, the President of the country administered a pledge to the legal fraternity that none of them would employ a child under the age of 14 years and s/he would provide immediate assistance to any child engaged in child labour. The DLSA has pledged to provide free legal assistance to take up the cases of victims of child labour, also the first time that any legal body has taken up the issue of child labour so closely. This idea was the brain child of Bachpan Bachao Andolan (BBA) with whom DLSA would jointly organize legal training to law enforcement agencies. The event was jointly organized by DLSA and BBA. | | | Justice M.K.Sharma and Justice Virender Jain, in their welcome speech stated that for their auspicious silver jubilee celebrations, no theme could be more pertinent than children, the future citizens of India and the aid that DLSA could give to the victims of exploited child labourers. It was this idea that appealed to DLSA to work jointly with BBA in victim's legal assistance and in the training of law enforcement agencies. The Chief Justice of India appealed to the Judges, lawyers and students to take care of the millions of poor backward people of the country, so that the God will take care of the Nation. He said the purpose of organizing such functions is to motivate, sensitise and inspire all stake holders.

The Minister for law and Justice, Dr. H. R. Bhardwaj said translating the mandate of Article 14 of the Constitution is a Herculean task as there is huge disparity in the country. Legal Aid to the poor taken up by Delhi Legal Services Authority is a commendable step as it can help achieve equality of status and opportunities. Speaking of the role of the civil society and NGOs in particular, he commended DLSA's move to work with the civil society on the issue of child labour.
Former child labourers rescued by BBA and school children formed a human chain under the leadership of Chief Justice of India, Y.K.Sabharwal at India Gate. | | | | | | | | Kailash Satyarthi Column | | | Profile | | Archive | | | | -------------------------------------------------
Top of FormWrite to Mr. Satyarthi | Full Name: | | Email: | | Age: | | Country: | | Comments: | | Bottom of Form | | | "BBA estimates that at least 10 million children are victims of child servitude in each of these two sectors. Since domestic help is “invisible” slavery, the agony — including branding, beating, even rape — goes unheard and unnoticed.” | | | | |
Child labour: The government has a tough job ahead of itLet us begin with Ashraf. It would be inappropriate, rather unethical, not to remember this brave boy.

The Government of India’s notification to ban some shameful forms of child labour — like their employment as domestic workers and in dhabas, restaurants, motels, resorts, and in other recreational centres — is a great moral victory in the fight against these invisible forms of slavery.

Ashraf, who was working at the residence of a senior IAS officer, was burnt with a stove by his employer because he dared to drink the milk meant for the bureaucrat’s child.

We at the Bachpan Bachao Andolan (BBA), a civil society movement, took up Ashraf’s case with the National Human Rights Commission and, in 1999, a rule was passed prohibiting government servants from employing children as domestic helps.

Since then we have been trying to get the ban on use of children as domestic slaves extended.

The government notification has done just that, but we still have a long, long way to go.

The government does not have much data on domestic child labour or children working in the hospitality industry.

BBA estimates that at least 10 million children are victims of child servitude in each of these two sectors. Since domestic help is “invisible” slavery, the agony — including branding, beating, even rape — goes unheard and unnoticed.

The record on prosecutions since the enactment of the Child Labour Law 1986 makes for dismal reading: not a single offender has been punished as per the provision of the law, which calls for a prison term of two years.

Similarly, a path-breaking judgment by the Supreme Court in 1996 on abolishing child labour has been grossly violated.

Given these ground realities, the government has a tough job on its hands to create a meaningful mechanism. It has to show strong political will, substantiated with a well-trained enforcement system as well as prompt and effective rehabilitative and educational measures.

Civil society organisations, NGOs, village panchayats, teaching communities and residential welfare associations (in urban setups) should be brought on board and partnerships with government agencies should be crafted.

A sustained media campaign should be launched by the government to back up its efforts. Most importantly, the accountability of enforcement agencies must be fixed.

Labour officials, the police, and factory inspectors must be punished if child labour exists in their jurisdiction.

Poverty has often been considered the key reason for the perpetuation of child labour.

In fact, it is the other way round: child labour is the primary cause of poverty. It pushes children prematurely into the workforce, denying them the opportunity to acquire the education and skills needed to obtain decent employment and incomes as adults.

The employment of children weakens the bargaining power of adult workers in terms of securing the legally guaranteed minimum wage or decent working conditions.

While child labour has a negative impact on the economy, investment in basic education that is aimed at eliminating the practice brings many positive returns to a country’s overall economic development.

A recent report by International Labour Organisation has argued that initiatives to prevent and eliminate all forms of child labour by ensuring education for all have economic returns seven times higher than the investment.

The elimination of child labour is a prerequisite for any country that has social uplift and economic development on its agenda.

We must show the will to turn our words into action, and we can begin by taking the direct path to putting an end to child labour — by educating all of India’s children. | The majority of children deprived of their childhood, opportunities and future, live in different villages. Most of them are engaged in economic activities and denied schooling. Their emancipation is today's biggest challenge. The solution lies in changing the mindset, behavior and priorities of the village community. Bachpan Bachao Andolan (South Asian Coalition on Child Servitude) in India is working towards creating a child friendly society where the first and foremost step is child friendly village, BAL MITRA GRAM. | |
The BBA (SACCS) has been engaged in wiping out the blot of child servitude for more than two decades. Our efforts have led to the release of more than 60,000 children from the shackles of servitude. The uniqueness of the Bal Mitra Gram (BMG) initiative lies in active participation of the village children in creating a legitimate democratic space for themselves in panchayats, communities, schools and families. Secondly solving the deep rooted problem of child labour and creating a demand and value for good education as a village pride, igniting the mass consciousness and using the people's potential, power and local resources is another significant element for success and sustainability. BMG is the true translation of child rights at the grassroots level. | | | | | Children are future and if that future is not cared for, mankind's future is in question. My suggestions- 1- Implementing the rule of Compulsory Education till a child is 18, which means, the state must pick up the tab for educating every individual untill they are graduates. Presently, compulsory education system, means that the education is free, the children do not have to pay any fees for being educated, but the children who are availing this facility are from poor backgrounds and though they can afford to come to school, their uniforms, books, textbooks, food are not free or not entirely free. This defeats the concept of Compulsory Education. It is trying to grow a tree without roots. The government must ensure that the note books, text books, uniforms etc must be provided and a morning snack, and midday meal must be provided. This will encourage even poor families to send the children to be educated. 2. Child Labour - One of the main reasons for existence of child labour is poverty. Poverty is a existing concept even in advanced countries. But the poverty line in India covers a larger % of the population. Government must formulate plans to lift the poor by providing realistic opportunities for growth. Many poor people do not receive the minimum wage, the government must ensure this. Government in India can create more work and monitor it directly instead of passing it to private contractors.This will ensure a fair dispersal of income to poor. Even recruitment for government jobs, defence forces, must earmark a certain quota for poor people. If this income level increases then the need to send the child out to work will not be necessary 3- The most potent reason for a child to give up education and take up labour is disinterest in education. In our country (as in many other countries including advanced countries) the education system needs a revamp. The focus of education for a child till he or she is 15 is very focussed in giving book information. despite including other practical skills, the lack of realisitic skill based education disinterests many children. They dread the concept of studying for 9 months and trying to take and exam at the end of it and pass it. with the child not understanding the seriousness of having to learn, remember, and take exams many children fail. This failure leads to disinterest, due to the stigma attached to kids that fail. The education system must formulate a scheme, where knowledge and skills are equally provided. The teachers must be able to identify the child's interests and track their interests and start to operate a interest based education to children. This need not be a change in the present system of education, all it needs is an early start of skill based education. For example, if a child is identified to be good at mechanical aspects, the skills classes that schools teach must exploit this talent in the children. At present, the entire class is taught one or two skills which is not the right way forward. A more personalised approach will help students stay on in education system rather than fall out. 4- You have sought only 3 points, but I guess I have one more suggestion. I am sure we can go one step further for those kids........ In simple words, bring tougher laws to deal with people indulging in Child Labour. Jailing and fine will ensure children and left in classrooms Keep up your good work Nandita!! Top experts' rating: (7 ratings) Public rating: (click on stars to rate) | * * 1 * 2 * 3 * 4 * 5 | (0 ratings) | | Thank this advisor | | | Response from: swapna nair,
Registered Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.Dear Maam, THREE PRACTICAL WAYS TO ERADICATE CHILD LABOUR1. CHILD LABOUR The first step in arriving at a solution is to first recognize the causes of this dilemma: these include poverty, burdens on the family to pay off standing debts, the general Indian attitude toward child labor, the irrelevant and often inaccessible education system, and the inefficiency of protective legislation for working children. In the post-reform years the problem has assumed extra importance due to the likely inclusion of the social clause in the WTO agreement. Although it is a fact that child labour in India is concentrated in a few pockets and regions, the issue acquires significance in view of the recent reports that India share of the total world percentage of child labour is amongst the highest. 2. Causes The causes of the high incidence of Child Labour in India are discussed in brief. It will be seen that the causes discussed also provide the remedy to the issue at large. (a) Illiteracy, Population and under equipped for Modern Industries 75- 80% of the population is rural based, whose sustenance is agriculture and small scale and cottage industries. Major percentage is illiterate or semi literate. The illiteracy level of India’s one billion populations is 40%. 36% of this population is unemployed. This category is unable to find jobs in modern industries. Main traditional crafts manufacturing has almost collapsed due to lack of demand in international market has further aggravated unemployment crisis. (b) Family Debt Often family debts are passed on to the next generation forcing young children into bonded labor. This leads to a vicious cycle of debts, repayment defaults, debt again and then pledge their own children in to labour for life. © General Attitude The general Indian attitude toward child labor presents yet another factor in the continuance of this social problem. This attitude comprises a feeling of indifference and helplessness towards the problem of child labour . (d) Lack of Accountability Laws and legislations are in place, however they are not implemented due to the oft repeated pretexts of social disparity, huge size of the country, and political pressures.3. Three Practical ways to eradicate Child labour Infact there are more than three measures that can be taken to eradicate child labour, which are:- (a) Education Impart 100% literacy to eradicate 100% child labour. A case in point is the comparison between Kerala and Andhra Pradesh. Kerala has the highest rate of school going children and conversely the lowest/negligible No of children engaged in child labour. Andhra Pradesh, in contrast, is a case study in reverse order. (b) Social Security In Org/Unorganised Sector Create infrastructure and shift industries and manpower intensive units out of the metro cities to the rural areas. This will restrict the flow of employment related migration and the consequent implications that lead to child labour. Have more SEZs. © Strict Implementation of Legislations and increased people awareness For all the laws and legislations to really come in to force, it is the people who have to give the final push. If people were to take a conscious and deliberate decision to boycott goods involving child labour, drastic changes will be forced onto the environment. (d) Contribution of Religious and community leaders Religious leaders are very helpful; taking religious leaders into confidence would definitely contribute to partial success. ----swapnachild labour.doc (24.576k)Top experts' rating: (10 ratings) Public rating: (click on stars to rate) | * * 1 * 2 * 3 * 4 * 5 | (0 ratings) | | | | Response from: DS Mathur,
Council Member on Ammas.com
Source: This information comes from my own knowledge.You have emphasised on individual effort to help stop the practice of child labour. At the individual level following steps may help in the right direction: 1.The main issue is poverty. A child is sent to work because he helps the family to meet the day to day expenditure through whatever little he earns.We can start free vocational classes at a time when most of the working children are free. These classes should not be very long and should teach the child basic lingusitic skills and such other skills that after a while he would be in a position to start earning on his own. Most of us are good at one such skill or the other. These days computer data entry work is widespread.Once a child is good enought to start reading and writing, he can be grromed into this skill. We must not insist that he gave up his current job for admission into such a course. This would be counter productive as the family would not allow that. But with his current job if he can be imparted these skills perhaps the family would also cooperate. 2.It is very easy to start funding the expenses of a child in a family but such charity does not work in the long run.We have to ensure that we are able to provide an equally good alternative to the family in place of the job that the child holds.Many children attend schools in the hope that they would get a full meal there. Unfortunately the lower government functionaries siphon off the food stuff into the black market and the children are deprived of the benefit of these supplies. The attendance in schools fall off. In many states committees of non officials are formed to oversee this activity. We can take a leading role in such committees. 3. There are very many government schemes for the welfare of poor families. These families are eithe rnot aware of these schemes, or they are unable to get benefit of them due to their limitations. We can play a leading role in getting such benefits to them on express condition that the benefits are being ensured to balance the loss of wages that the child used to earn. He should now attend school instead of toiling at petty jobs.Top experts' rating: (8 ratings) Public rating: (click on stars to rate) | * * 1 * 2 * 3 * 4 * 5 | (0 ratings) | | | Thank this advisor | | | Response from: HIMANSHU MOHAN,
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Source: This information comes from my own knowledge. Dear Nandita, Namaste. Keep up the good work for good cause. However One must remember that GOoD can not exist without GOD. Three steps at individual level that come to my mind are- 1. Boycott such items of luxury which are known to employ child labour, as also those items hazardous to human helth in general and children in particular. Examples are Hand-woven Carpets, Bidi/Cigarrette industry, fireworks etc. 2. Support needy children to the extent possible from our individual or collective resources, because indiscriminate boycott of child labour results sometimes in acute poverty and loss of avenues to children of the deprived families, who manage somehow to survive by all members of fmily working, due to loss of breadwinner of the family or other such reasons. All political cmpaign against child labour overlooks this spect of the problem, that by employing child labour, in some cases, one may be ctually trying to help them finncially. It may be act of benevolnce and kindness rather than oppression. It is suggested that we must support them (children) financially either unconditionally, or their employment can be of such nature that they are not required to exhort and toil physically but their job helps them in their education also. Such jobs where they are required to read and write, maybe reading newspaper to an elderly person, writing letters and applications or teaching tiny-tots ABC, 123 etc. could be among such jobs. 3. Helipng children attain education upto the level of 8th standard and possibly beyond is most vital link of this exrcise. Fallout from schools only augments labour at scooter/bike/auto repair shops and dishwashers at roadside restaurants and dhabas. Dhabas-owners particularly misuse and abuse children in ways more than one. So we must help children in getting education, as also rescue them from such dhabas. Another angle of this aspect is related to rising population oupled with illiteracy, so that parents kind of "sell" their children to dhaba owners where they get two square meals and the parents collect salary in cash, thus making children alternative source of income. So my focus would be "Education with stress on population control". Education can play a vital role in curbing all evils, let alone child labour and education of girl child can do wonders since one aware woman can make one family as well as her progeny aware and educated. Thus the third step we can take is -accepting the load of education of children, at least one child other than our own, from the needy, with specific leaning towards the girl child". This list need not be full, final or exhaustive, but the idea is that a beginning must be made by each one of us, not waiting for the government or some other body to come and take the lead. I have therefore suggested what I have already seen my father and mother doing throughout their life and what I have also therefore learnt and implemented in my limited individual capacity. On the ending note, let me explain my opening remark. Worship to the GOD is achieved through such deeds that are intended towards helping the needy, not by simply reciting some chants or visiting shrines and temples/mosques/churches. If we believe that such Acts of helping the needy are actually Worship of GOD, ways and means shall be available with paths opening up by the grace of GOD almighty. God Bless You Nandita, and may grant you strength always for every good cause you undertake. Mohan, H. Top experts' rating: (9 ratings) Public rating: (click on stars to rate) | * * 1 * 2 * 3 * 4 * 5 | (0 ratings) | | | | | Response from: mini nathan,
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Initiatives towards Elimination of Child Labour – Action Plan and Present Strategy
The problem of child labour continues to pose a challenge before the nation. Government has been taking various pro-active measures to tackle this problem. However, considering the magnitude and extent of the problem and that it is essentially a socio-economic problem inextricably linked to poverty and illiteracy, it requires concerted efforts from all sections of the society to make a dent in the problem.
Way back in 1979, Government formed the first committee called Gurupadswamy Committee to study the issue of child labour and to suggest measures to tackle it. The Committee examined the problem in detail and made some far-reaching recommendations. It observed that as long as poverty continued, it would be difficult to totally eliminate child labour and hence, any attempt to abolish it through legal recourse would not be a practical proposition. The Committee felt that in the circumstances, the only alternative left was to ban child labour in hazardous areas and to regulate and ameliorate the conditions of work in other areas. It recommended that a multiple policy approach was required in dealing with the problems of working children.
Based on the recommendations of Gurupadaswamy Committee, the Child Labour (Prohibition & Regulation) Act was enacted in 1986. The Act prohibits employment of children in certain specified hazardous occupations and processes and regulates the working conditions in others. The list of hazardous occupations and processes is progressively being expanded on the recommendation of Child Labour Technical Advisory Committee constituted under the Act.
In consonance with the above approach, a National Policy on Child Labour was formulated in 1987. The Policy seeks to adopt a gradual & sequential approach with a focus on rehabilitation of children working in hazardous occupations & processes in the first instance. The Action Plan outlined in the Policy for tackling this problem is as follows: * Legislative Action Plan for strict enforcement of Child Labour Act and other labour laws to ensure that children are not employed in hazardous employments, and that the working conditions of children working in non-hazardous areas are regulated in accordance with the provisions of the Child Labour Act. It also entails further identification of additional occupations and processes, which are detrimental to the health and safety of the children. * Focusing of General Developmental Programmes for Benefiting Child Labour - As poverty is the root cause of child labour, the action plan emphasizes the need to cover these children and their families also under various poverty alleviation and employment generation schemes of the Government. * Project Based Plan of Action envisages starting of projects in areas of high concentration of child labour. Pursuant to this, in 1988, the National Child Labour Project (NCLP) Scheme was launched in 9 districts of high child labour endemicity in the country. The Scheme envisages running of special schools for child labour withdrawn from work. In the special schools, these children are provided formal/non-formal education along with vocational training, a stipend of Rs.100 per month, supplementary nutrition and regular health check ups so as to prepare them to join regular mainstream schools. Under the Scheme, funds are given to the District Collectors for running special schools for child labour. Most of these schools are run by the NGOs in the district.
Government has accordingly been taking proactive steps to tackle this problem through strict enforcement of legislative provisions along with simultaneous rehabilitative measures. State Governments, which are the appropriate implementing authorities, have been conducting regular inspections and raids to detect cases of violations. Since poverty is the root cause of this problem, and enforcement alone cannot help solve it, Government has been laying a lot of emphasis on the rehabilitation of these children and on improving the economic conditions of their families.
The coverage of the NCLP Scheme has increased from 12 districts in 1988 to 100 districts in the 9th Plan to 250 districts during the 10th Plan.
Strategy for the elimination of child labour under the 10th Plan An evaluation of the Scheme was carried out by independent agencies in coordination with V. V. Giri National Labour Institute in 2001. Based on the recommendations of the evaluation and experience of implementing the scheme since 1988, the strategy for implementing the scheme during the 10th Plan was devised. It aimed at greater convergence with the other developmental schemes and bringing qualitative changes in the Scheme. Some of the salient points of the 10th Plan Strategy are as follows: * Focused and reinforced action to eliminate child labour in the hazardous occupations by the end of the Plan period. * Expansion of National Child Labour Projects to additional 150 districts. * Linking the child labour elimination efforts with the Scheme of Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan of Ministry of Human Resource Development to ensure that children in the age group of 5-8 years get directly admitted to regular schools and that the older working children are mainstreamed to the formal education system through special schools functioning under the NCLP Scheme. * Convergence with other Schemes of the Departments of Education, Rural Development, Health and Women and Child Development for the ultimate attainment of the objective in a time bound manner.
The Government and the Ministry of Labour & Employment in particular, are rather serious in their efforts to fight and succeed in this direction. The number of districts covered under the NCLP Scheme has been increased from 100 to 250, as mentioned above in this note. In addition, 21 districts have been covered under INDUS, a similar Scheme for rehabilitation of child labour in cooperation with US Department of Labour. Implementation of this Project was recently reviewed during the visit of Mr. Steven Law, Deputy Secretary of State, from the USA. For the Districts not covered under these two Schemes, Government is also providing funds directly to the NGOs under the Ministry’s Grants-in-aid Scheme for running Special Schools for rehabilitation of child labour, thereby providing for a greater role and cooperation of the civil society in combating this menace.
Elimination of child labour is the single largest programme in this Ministry’s activities. Apart from a major increase in the number of districts covered under the scheme, the priority of the Government in this direction is evident in the quantum jump in budgetary allocation during the 10th Plan. Government has allocated Rs. 602 crores for the Scheme during the 10th Plan, as against an expenditure of Rs. 178 crores in the 9th Plan. The resources set aside for combating this evil in the Ministry is around 50 per cent of its total annual budget.
The implementation of NCLP and INDUS Schemes is being closely monitored through periodical reports, frequent visits and meetings with the District and State Government officials. The Government’s commitment to achieve tangible results in this direction in a time bound manner is also evident from the fact that in the recent Regional Level Conferences of District Collectors held in Hyderabad, Pune, Mussoorie and Kolkata district-wise review of the Scheme was conducted at the level of Secretary. These Conferences provided an excellent opportunity to have one-to-one interaction with the Collectors, who play a pivotal role in the implementation of these Schemes in the District. Besides, these Conferences also helped in a big way in early operationalisation of Scheme in the newly selected 150 districts. The Government is committed to eliminate child labour in all its forms and is moving in this direction in a targeted manner. The multipronged strategy being followed by the Government to achieve this objective also found its echo during the recent discussions held in the Parliament on the Private Member’s Bill tabled by Shri Iqbal Ahmed Saradgi. It was unanimously recognized therein that the problem of child labour, being inextricably linked with poverty and illiteracy, cannot be solved by legislation alone, and that a holistic, multipronged and concerted effort to tackle this problem will bring in the desired results.…...

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