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Cat's Cradle

In: English and Literature

Submitted By TheInvisibleBob
Words 537
Pages 3
Kurt Vonnegut's satirical novel targets three main ideas. The targets include Tyrannical Governments, Human Stupidity, and Religion. The way he targets each of the topic is incorporated all over Cat's Cradle, from Bokononism to the creation of Ice-Nine to "Papa" Monzano's dictatorship. He would exaggerate on the topic so much that would depict it as the truth when really it was the opposite.
Throughout the history of San Lorenzo, Tyranny was the governing body of choice. Although so many countries had claimed San Lorenzo, they were all loosely held as each country or government cared little to none about who conquers San Lorenzo next. The reason for this was because the people of San Lorenzo were so lazy and cared little toward the governing body making it resistible to acquire. Even the land of which San Lorenzo sat on was unwanted. “Papa” Monzano was a character satirizing Papa Doc, whom was the Haitian Dictator. He made fun of the island and their people saying that the people all had no interest in what went on with the government just like the Haitian people when Papa Doc initiated a Brain Drain.
Vonnegut’s next target is Human Stupidity. Felix Hoenikker showed no signs of caring for what people thought or did. Even when his children would fight he would simply look at them and return back to what he was doing. The reason why Felix is a sign of Human Stupidity is because of how little he cared for when he created Ice-Nine knowing how dangerous it was. This is probably true as well when he helped “create” the atom bomb. His children as well are signs of Human Stupidity because of how they used Ice-Nine to gain a somewhat normal life. Angela gave her husband Ice-Nine in order for him to marry her, which in turn was in the United States hands. Newt was insecure and felt normal while with Zinka, thus him lowering his guard and in return Ice-Nine being stolen and…...

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