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African Study

In: English and Literature

Submitted By dominate
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In the Conniff, Part I Preface, the author basically summary the book which is about African diaspora in the Americas. It includes African Americans’ individuality and personality. It “fills the continents from north to south and at all points in between”. Moreover, the book also include about global history and as well as the multicultural in classroom. In order to do so, many people contributed to finish the book, there are over fifteen main scholars and many reviewers who combine their ideas together to create the book. All of that said, the book is a combination of many people ideas, experience and surveys. Therefore it is a reliable book to read and study. Last but not lease, the author does not forget to explain to the reader more about the language term in the book to avoid misunderstanding between the author and reader. After reading the preface of the book, I feel that this should be a good book to read to understand more about African American culture and there living style. It should provide me a better view on African Americans’ individuality and personality. Furthermore, the preface mentions about the relations between Africa, Europe, and African American. That should be an interesting topic that I am looking forward to study about. I want to know more about African American normal life, their advantage and disadvantage when they live in America through the racism between black and white. That is the reason why the history of the civil rights interested me. After attend the second class, I know that there will be a lot more interesting topics than which are mentioned in the preface to be covered in this semester such as history of African American, African Diaspora, Jewish Diaspora, blood lines. Therefore, I am looking forward to attend more classes and discover more interesting information in this topic.…...

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